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Thread: 55 gal fuel rack on cabin

  1. #1
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    Default 55 gal fuel rack on cabin

    I am looking into a drum rack that is solely attached to the side of the building. I will have to build it out of wood or iron but looking for ideas before I need to get it started. Anyone have photos of thiers? Please no free standing or ground mounted rack, Thakns you.

    George

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    Member AK Ray's Avatar
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    No photos, but my friends in Fairbanks made two 90-60-30 triangles out of 4x4. He was practicing timber framing and all the joints were mortise and tenon on angles. The two frames were mounted to the side of the garage using four 1/2 inch lag bolts in each frame into the framing of the garage.

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    Thank AK Ray, I might look at somthing similar with Angle Iron.

    George

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    How many brums are you wanting to hang on a single wall?
    How high is the wall?
    What is the wall made of? logs or 2x4 on 16" or 24" center
    How high does the outlet need to be above the ground?
    Is the inlet going to be on the top and the outlet on the bottom?
    Do the barrows need to be at an angle say 30* or can they be vertical?
    If made out of angle can part of it be welded in section?

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    I have a single drum now on 4x4s but the bottom is rotten. I can weld all the pieces once I get them on site. The bottom of the drum laid horizonal is about 6' off the ground and will be angled slightly toward the outlet. I will be attaching to a 2x4 studded wall, don't remember the on center but think it to be 24". If needs be I can lag 2x4's as attachment supports.

    Thanks for the interest.

    George

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    You never said if you wanted the drum parallel to the cabin or sticking out. If you want it next to the cabin you could make the frame that sit under the drum out of 1 Ĺ x 1 Ĺ angle. It would only be 26x 34 depending on the design and the supports (legs) could be a single leg or a triangle bolted on.

    All the cutting, drilling, and painting could be done in town and save the welding for out there.

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    Member Rock_skipper's Avatar
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    George the way I would engenier this project is to add a couple of 4x4s, 6x6s or whatever your wall thickness is, then add some horizonal supports on the wall, one low one high on the inside and the outside each. Add 45 degree angled 4x4s with the right hardware Two from the bottom up, and two from top down to the outside of your stand. Install it all with through bolts. I believe you can by the hardware from SBS. My 2 cents.

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    I just used 4 2x6's, making an X pattern, tied together with a short lateral brace, and two longitudinal braces. It sits next to the shed, unattached. Sprayed it with some siding stain, and it's been just fine for 4 years.... cost about $20.

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    Thanks for the input guys. The barrel would be parallel with the building. Here is a simple drawing from ideas from this thread.

    What do you think?

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    Member dkwarthog's Avatar
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    Probably dont need the cross piece at the bottom against the wall, but I would add an X brace between the two angled legs especially if you live where the ground shakes on occasion. Also something attached to the top of the frame to keep the barrel from rolling would be a good idea.

    Just a couple of random thoughts...

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    That simmer to what I came up with except in my design I have 3 legs and the bar next to the cabin is 50 inch because you donít know if you have 16 or 24 inch centers on your studs. The weakest point of the design is bolting into the cabin studs. If you add 2x4 to the cabin you still have the same problem if you donít do I right.

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    George , The only thing that I would add would be metal straps going from the outside top of the rack up over the barrel bolted to the wall .That would give you a little more support for the rack and also holding the barrel in place in case of a shaker. Spenard Builders and others sell a fairly heavy a galvinzed in rolls that is used as a brace under the sheeting as a diagonal brace for walls. And then you would have the extra for other projects. Good Luck

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    Seriously, I could build a rack that would easily support 350# using some scrap plywood and a couple of 2x4s. Make a barrel cradle and support it with some 2x4 kickers. If you're worried that the kickers won't stay solid with nails have the ends butt to ledger boards top and bottom. You could easily support lots more weight than one drum will provide. In the design that George illustrates the load is primarily vertical. Holding it to the building is easy. I have a 4KW generator platform built like it, but with scrap ply and 2x4s, and it's held up for 20 years, and that's with lots of vibration.

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    Member dkwarthog's Avatar
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    Although Mr PID is 100% right, I will add that I've seen a 55 gal drum of diesel feeding a genset that was supported by a wood frame adjacent to the generator shed. When the support frame caught on fire and burned for a little while, the frame collapsed, the barrell fell to the ground and rolled away and stopped very near to the man's cabin. It was on fire at the time. Short story long, the barrel exploded, I'm talking about a fireball and flying shrapnel. As the fuel heated up and expanded, it couldnt vent fast enough and kept building pressure until it blew.

    Anyhow, I'd be leery about storing fuel on a wooden frame unless it was logs or something with enough mass to stay stable for a long time while on fire. Granted, the chance that it catches fire is low, but I've seen in happen and it left an indelible mark on my memory...FWIW

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    Thanks folks,

    Longer top cross piece to add attachability to the building is a great tip as well as cabling around the barrel to distribute the weight and keep it on the rack is another. While I was going put something to keep the barrel from rolling off I think I will use the cable thing as I will and do have that available.

    Pib, it is on a wook frame now, the big issue is the island floads and rots any untreated wood at the ground level. That is why I am engineering something like what I drew and asked for input.

    Thanks again for all in the input guys, it is always nice to get personal experience for bush engineering.

    George

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