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Thread: avalanche beacon's

  1. #1
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    Default avalanche beacon's

    Hey I was wondering if anyone had any info on avalanche beacon's, what you guys are using, the ups and downs to the one you have. I know a little about the Spot & Delorme person locators but I'm looking into more specifically the Avalanche Beacon's. If anyone could help me out it would be much appreciated.

  2. #2
    Member franklinfleagle's Avatar
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    well you want easy to use and a trusted name brand, personally i use SOS avalanche beacons, there are better easier to use ones now though, the important part is that you practice with them and put fresh lithium batteries in them at the begining of each season and maybe change em out once or twice if ya use it a lot, if i were to go buy a new beacon right now without a doubt it would be the tracker 2 the backcountry access- tracker 2 is the hottest thing in the mountains right now for avalanche beacons, it has arrows and 3 atennas to help you locate them super fast, the easier the better when ur in panic mode ya know, the important part though is whichever you chose practice with it and be prepared to use it and most importantly try to use your brain to stay out of the worse conditions and hazardous areas, evaluating snow pack and listening to the avalanche forecasters if they are in your area is your main defense, beacons are necessary tool anyone should carry in the backcountry but they definitely should be intended for worse case scenario and if possible avoid that situation good luck

  3. #3
    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by franklinfleagle View Post
    the important part though is whichever you chose practice with it and be prepared to use it and most importantly try to use your brain to stay out of the worse conditions and hazardous areas, evaluating snow pack and listening to the avalanche forecasters if they are in your area is your main defense, beacons are necessary tool anyone should carry in the backcountry but they definitely should be intended for worse case scenario and if possible avoid that situation good luck
    The other most important thing is to make sure your backcountry partner practices with their beacon as well. It won't do you much good if you're buried and your buddy doesn't know how to do a search. Practice, practice, practice...then in a bad situation you'll be able to move quickly instead of having to think through the process. For what it's worth, there is a practice area at Alyeska with buried beacon signals.

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    Member EagleRiverDee's Avatar
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    We have 3 Pieps DSP's in our family. When we bought them a year ago, the two best units out there appeared to be the Ortovox S1 and the Pieps DSP. The Pieps appeared to have a slight edge, and after taking refresher avy training this year my avy instructor confirmed that the Pieps handles cold weather better than the Ortovox S1 and has the longest range of any of the beacons on the market right now. It's also very easy to use. But you DO need to practice. Having a buddy buried is not the time to try and figure out how to use your beacon. Whatever you get, make sure you get a recent make with the triple antennae that transmits on 457kHz. A good online source is www.snowbigdeal.com . You might also go over to REI and look at them in person, see which one you like best. And make sure your buddies practice as well. The Alaska Avalanche School runs schools all season long - taking a good awareness workshop and a rescue workshop is well worth it. There's also a beacon field at Alyeska that you can practice at.
    "If snowmachiners would adopt the habits of riding one at a time and not parking at the base of avalanche prone slopes, the number of fatalities would likely be whittled by at least a third, if not by half." ~ Jill Fredston, in the book Snowstruck, In The Grip Of Avalanches.

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