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Thread: Kenai Sockeye rig

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    Default Kenai Sockeye rig

    Over the last two years I have noticed a different sockeye rig coming to my river from folks that are on the road system. I am assuming (I know what that means) it has spawned from the kenai and it is a corker just in front of the snelled hook with a piece of yarn. I think I know what the thought process is here but can anyone explain this rig to me?


    George

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    Member TYNMON's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by George Riddle View Post
    Over the last two years I have noticed a different sockeye rig coming to my river from folks that are on the road system. I am assuming (I know what that means) it has spawned from the kenai and it is a corker just in front of the snelled hook with a piece of yarn. I think I know what the thought process is here but can anyone explain this rig to me?


    George
    What I have noticed is a three way swivel with duolock snap to a weight, then 30" to 40" leader and a snelled hook (preferably 2X-4X long) and tie the yarn under the snell. The yarn not only get caught in the fish's teeth it add "lift" to give the hook a streamer presentation to get into the "zone" to catch reds as they swim by.

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    I fished out of Swiftwater one day last July during the huge run of reds that came in. I ended up fishing on one the elevated platforms near the boat launch with some guys from Washington. They were using a 3-way with the weighted end using lead hollow core and about a 4-5ft leader off the other side fishing a pretty small snelled hook. Toss a real small corkie on above the hook and some yarn on the snelled portion of the hook. Tossed out maybe 25 yards into some swirling current and a slow retrieve had this group of maybe 8 guys catching fish constantly for about 3 hours.

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    Anybody care to share a picture of this rig? sounds like it would work well enough. I have had better luck using smaller size hooks but many people seem to prefer the largest legal hook for the water. Would be interested to see one of these rigs though.

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    The only thing really large hooks gets you is snagged fish. Down size your hook and play with leader length and weight. Leader length and proper weighting are the absolute keys to sockeye fishing in my opinion. I've caught just as many or more fish using size 6 and 8 octopus hooks as I used to with the standard russian river hooks.
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    I used a smaller hook with better success this year. I was using a 5 and decided to play around and went down to a 3. I also played with leader length and it greatly varies with water you are fishing in but I found right at about 5-7 ft was the sweet spot for me. I tried the weight hanging off the swivel but it seems to get snagged a lot. A few small split shot seemed to be much more friendly and if they get hung up they come right off. Also the less weight on the end of the line the better when your talking about sockeye. I must have cast several hundred times in a day and with a lot of weight your arm can get pretty tired.
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    This setup is usually used for side drifting steelhead. It is also used for drifting kings, it is more popular in the Pac. NW of the lower 48. The idea is that the yarn looks like seeping eggs and the corky is used for smooth drift and attractor. My guess is that they were using this because it frees them up from big snags if they get the hook caught on the bottom. If you look up okie drifter it is comparable to that without the yarn. If they were casting it out farther it is easy to see that they would obviously need a long leeder and a fairly boyant corky to keep the hook in the slot where sockeye would be moving through.

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    for sockeye what you present them doesnt really matter,how you set up gear does.I use a tiny bead above my hook and a small piece of white yarn,too much yarn and it hangs up on the hook barb and makes it harder to hook them,the yarn is for the troopers,the bead is for the fish.When you flip the bead keeps you line straighter as it enters the water thus giving a better chance for the line enter fishes mouth.Too big of hook does for me cause more snags then its worth as it does not flow through thier mouth nicely.Leader size is critical too small and you not getting line in front of a lot of fish.too big and it may be too difficult to set the hook,its kind of a personal thing.The drop weight on the three way does seem to help sometimes as it keeps the main line off the bottom a it which in turn keeps the line straighter and I use split shot so if it snags I usually dont lose all my gear just a weight or two..I do sometimes use a corkie vs a bead but for kings but not sockeye.too big of either one and it will cause the hook to bounce out of the mouth vs hooking.
    I have seen many different ways over the last 25 orso years and this way has always worked well for me..with that said I have not seen that setup in the OP post and would be courious to see it..

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    Quote Originally Posted by TYNMON View Post
    What I have noticed is a three way swivel with duolock snap to a weight, then 30" to 40" leader and a snelled hook (preferably 2X-4X long) and tie the yarn under the snell. The yarn not only get caught in the fish's teeth it add "lift" to give the hook a streamer presentation to get into the "zone" to catch reds as they swim by.
    I wouldn't put much stock in the notion that yarn gets caught in the fish's teeth, thereby increasing the catch rate. You will be better served to make sure you have a sharp hook and the proper drift versus enough yarn to get tangled in the fish's teeth.

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    I use a bead first on the main line, (to protect the front of the lead),then hollow core lead, about 3" long 1/4" round, then a swivel, then the leader, about 5 to 7 feet, I tie an egg loop on my hook, and before finishing the knot I lay some yarn into the top of the hook, that way it cannot get to the sharp part of the hook, this keeps the line right on the bottom, I seem to be successful so it works for me.

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    [QUOTE=George Riddle;1067009]Over the last two years I have noticed a different sockeye rig coming to my river from folks that are on the road system. I am assuming (I know what that means) it has spawned from the kenai and it is a corker just in front of the snelled hook with a piece of yarn. I think I know what the thought process is here but can anyone explain this rig to me?

    This is not used for the Kenai. This was developed by my good friend Flip Wilson. It was designed for Wolverine Creek, where the water is stagnate. Because of the cork the fly floats (floating fly) then a small split shot is placed at the depth of the fish. The fish get caught in the line and slide down to the hook. It works great in the right conditions. I hope this helps. Bear Paw Outdoors

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