Results 1 to 20 of 20

Thread: Lingcod fishing

  1. #1

    Default Lingcod fishing

    Any advice on where the best place to catch lings is? a place where you can keep a few using a charter?

  2. #2
    Member Hunt&FishAK's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Valley trash
    Posts
    2,316

    Default

    you need a boat...homer, PWS (whittier/valdez/cordova) ,seward, all those ports have a wide selection of charters to choose from, with most offering up combo trips.....check regs and book early....lings open july 1st in most waters....(i believe? correct me guys if im wrong)......limit is 2? pretty sure.... and there are size restrictions....start calling around for pricing and booking......good luck



    Release Lake Trout

  3. #3
    webmaster Michael Strahan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 1999
    Location
    Anchorage, Alaska
    Posts
    5,765

    Default

    You might start with a look at our Ling Cod Fishing page. They are found all the way from Southeast out past Kodiak and onto the Alaska Peninsula. You'll want to check the regs for seasons and bag limits. If I remember correctly, season out of Seward opens July 1?

    As to "keeping a few", I believe the limit in PWS is one per day. I can't speak for the rest of the area. We've had good luck out of Seward with Saltwater Safari and with Crackerjack Charters. I also went with Happy Hooker out of Kodiak last summer and had a great time with lings, rockfish, and halibut. I've heard really good things about Jumping Salmon Lodge in Chenega Bay, and Kodiak Combos out of Old Harbor, Kodiak. There are of course many others out there; these are just some of the ones I know. The owners of some of these companies are members on this site.

    Hope it helps!

    -Mike
    LOST CREEK COMPANY: Specializing in Alaska hunt consultation and planning for do-it-yourself hunts, fully outfitted hunts, and guided hunts.
    CLICK HERE to send me a private message.
    Web Address: http://alaskaoutdoorssupersite.com/hunt-planner/
    Mob: 1 (907) 229-4501
    "Dream big, and dare to fail." -Norman Vaughan
    "I have climbed my mountain, but I must still live my life." - Tenzig Norgay

  4. #4
    Member Col. F Rodder's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Washington
    Posts
    295

    Default

    Depends on who you are going with and the boundary in PWS you can keep 2. I know some of the charters are trying to protect the resource and will only left you keep one like mentioned before. PWS size is 36", in Kodiak there was not a size restriction.
    I'm fishing with Mike Manns this year out of Homer which does a Grand Slam (2 Lings, 2 Halibut & 5 bass) Little pricey @$370 but understand he will put you on big fish. I'm with you would rather have my Ling over Halibut anyday.
    In Seward fished with ProFish n Sea, Kodiak with Runnamucker.

  5. #5
    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    5,594

    Default

    Where the regs get tricky are going out of Seward. You can't fish for lingcod in Resserection Bay. You can fish for them outside of the Bay. If you are in North Gulf Coast waters, which also includes K-bay aka Homer based charters, you are allowed to keep 1 lingcod over 35". If you're charter out of Seward heads into Prince William Sound waters, aka Montague Island, then you are allowed 2 per day over 35". Both seasons run July 1 to Dec 31. There are also differences in rockfish limits between the gulf and the sound. And, if you have a lingcod on board caught outside of R bay, then nobody on board can do any fishing for any species once the boat re-enters the bay.

    http://www.adfg.alaska.gov/index.cfm...s.sc_sportfish
    Those that are successful in Alaska are those who are flexible, and allow the reality of life in Alaska to shape their dreams, vs. trying to force their dreams on the reality of Alaska.

    If you have a tenuous grasp of reality, Alaska is not for you.

  6. #6
    Member thewhop2000's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Wasilla
    Posts
    2,366

    Default

    Nohing like keeping the regs easy to understand, Right? I call my lawyer everytime I get a strike on my rod, just in case.
    If a dipnetter dips a fish and there is no one around to see/hear it, Did he really dip?

  7. #7
    Premium Member Wyo2AK's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Spenard
    Posts
    1,232

    Default

    I've experienced great lingcod fishing out of Seward and Homer. Expect a long run (up to 3 hours or more) in either case to get into good fishing. That definitely limits the amount of time you get to spend with a rod in hand for a one-day trip.

    However, lingcod fishing is pretty much the best thing going! Plus you also have the potential to catch rockfish and halibut while ling fishing.
    Pursue happiness with diligence.

  8. #8
    webmaster Michael Strahan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 1999
    Location
    Anchorage, Alaska
    Posts
    5,765

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Wyo2AK View Post
    I've experienced great lingcod fishing out of Seward and Homer. Expect a long run (up to 3 hours or more) in either case to get into good fishing. That definitely limits the amount of time you get to spend with a rod in hand for a one-day trip.

    However, lingcod fishing is pretty much the best thing going! Plus you also have the potential to catch rockfish and halibut while ling fishing.
    Nice thing about Kodiak is that you're fishing a half-hour out of the harbor! That means that if my buddy heads to Seward at the same time I leave my home on my way to the Anchorage airport, I will be fishing long before he wets a line.

    Mike
    LOST CREEK COMPANY: Specializing in Alaska hunt consultation and planning for do-it-yourself hunts, fully outfitted hunts, and guided hunts.
    CLICK HERE to send me a private message.
    Web Address: http://alaskaoutdoorssupersite.com/hunt-planner/
    Mob: 1 (907) 229-4501
    "Dream big, and dare to fail." -Norman Vaughan
    "I have climbed my mountain, but I must still live my life." - Tenzig Norgay

  9. #9

    Default

    Thanks for the good info. Fished last year out of Homer--or I should say we left Homer and fished out of a camp near Elizabeth Island. Got to Gore once for incredibly fast Ling fishing, but weather kept us away the other 4 days. So, am looking for an alternative where we can fish for 5 days and catch Ling and "buts". We do not wish to deplete the resource and 2 or 3 nice lings for the trip is fine. Had fished Sitka, but got tired of throwing Lings back at every halibut stop.

    Suggestions on a good charter in Kodiak. We actually fished in sight of Kodiak Island last year (near the Barren Islands sp?) and didn't really catch many keeper Lings. Maybe it is better on the other side of the island.

  10. #10
    Charterboat Operator
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Homer Alaska
    Posts
    714

    Default

    Just keep heading west man! it gets better and better!

  11. #11
    Member IceKing02's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Eagle River
    Posts
    552

    Default

    Wahoo,

    Go call Kristen at Saltwater Excursions. She knows where the lings are hiding...and that's a fact! I could show you pictures but I wouldn't want to see grown men cry!

    IceKing02

  12. #12
    Member redleader's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Lake Granby, Co. / Homer AK
    Posts
    555

    Default

    The guides that target and kill lings are self destructive and have already destroyed most of the closer in areas ruining it for everyone, they keep having to go farther and farther out as they wipe them out, it's not uncommon to need to travel 50+ miles to find them. catch and release on lings or sticking to a one fish limit makes sense. Supporting the guides that practice wiping them out doesn't.

  13. #13
    webmaster Michael Strahan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 1999
    Location
    Anchorage, Alaska
    Posts
    5,765

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by redleader View Post
    The guides that target and kill lings are self destructive and have already destroyed most of the closer in areas ruining it for everyone, they keep having to go farther and farther out as they wipe them out, it's not uncommon to need to travel 50+ miles to find them. catch and release on lings or sticking to a one fish limit makes sense. Supporting the guides that practice wiping them out doesn't.
    I see lings as a valid sport fish and see nothing wrong with targeting them. They grow relatively quickly, and they don't live much past 14 or so. So theyre not like yelloweye, which live well past 50 years. I do agree that we have to be wise about over-harvest, though, and perhaps that's what you're talking about.

    Mike
    LOST CREEK COMPANY: Specializing in Alaska hunt consultation and planning for do-it-yourself hunts, fully outfitted hunts, and guided hunts.
    CLICK HERE to send me a private message.
    Web Address: http://alaskaoutdoorssupersite.com/hunt-planner/
    Mob: 1 (907) 229-4501
    "Dream big, and dare to fail." -Norman Vaughan
    "I have climbed my mountain, but I must still live my life." - Tenzig Norgay

  14. #14
    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    5,594

    Default

    I'm not saying that the lings can't be affected by heavy pressure from charters, but I have caught respectable lings without heading way, way out. In fact my best day catching lings was out of Seward not much past the mouth of the bay. It wasn't a trip for lings we were after halibut as it was mid May. Well, all I could manage to do was catch and release lings, at least 1/2 dozen. And they weren't holding to the type of terrain one usually fishes for them. Of course the biggest one was taken at 350', lots of fun pulling up a big fish from the depths then letting them go.
    Those that are successful in Alaska are those who are flexible, and allow the reality of life in Alaska to shape their dreams, vs. trying to force their dreams on the reality of Alaska.

    If you have a tenuous grasp of reality, Alaska is not for you.

  15. #15
    Member Alaska Gray's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage, Alaska, United States
    Posts
    4,925

    Default

    Lings are my favorite fish to fish for. They are pretty easy to catch once you know what to look for. Onc found you can have a field day catch them. We love to use light gear and even a fly rod. When I go out. I try to hit one area and then leave that area alone for a few weeks. I have over 30 spots for lings.... Best eatting fish there is......
    Charters will go out far for them. Regs are pretty simple until you get to Seawrd. Just know the boundries and limits...
    Living the Alaskan Dream
    Gary Keller
    Anchorage, AK

  16. #16
    Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    KP
    Posts
    115

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Wyo2AK View Post
    I've experienced great lingcod fishing out of Seward and Homer. Expect a long run (up to 3 hours or more) in either case to get into good fishing. That definitely limits the amount of time you get to spend with a rod in hand for a one-day trip.

    However, lingcod fishing is pretty much the best thing going! Plus you also have the potential to catch rockfish and halibut while ling fishing.
    Ling fishing is getting more popular every year. So pressure is growing, Kodiak also has smaller tides so it's easier to fish

  17. #17
    Member homerdave's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    homer, alaska
    Posts
    3,922

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Michael Strahan View Post
    I see lings as a valid sport fish and see nothing wrong with targeting them. They grow relatively quickly, and they don't live much past 14 or so. So theyre not like yelloweye, which live well past 50 years. I do agree that we have to be wise about over-harvest, though, and perhaps that's what you're talking about.

    Mike
    though ling do not live nearly as long as yellow-eye and shortraker rockfish ( over 100 years in some cases, commonly over 75) they do live significantly longer than 14 years. 20 is a number often cited in for upper age limit, though Milton Love says over 35. as with halibut, the females are larger, and live longer, with about 1/2 reaching sexual maturity at 4 years of age, but not until 10 yrs is it 100%. the larger older females spawn earlier (giving their offspring a longer growing season) and lay more eggs, over 400,000, than the smaller younger females.
    Like huge halibut, every time you take a really big ling you are killing off the best spawners.
    Lingcod are extremely sensitive to overfishing and the adults tend to have very strong site fidelity. transported lingcod have been known to return to the site of capture from nearly 10 miles away in less than 24 hrs.
    Tagged lingcod are consistently recaptured in the same areas.
    The entire west coast lingcod fishery is a shadow of it's past self, we don't need to look far or far back to see what overfishing can do to lings.
    They are also pretty high in mercury content, and should not be fed to children, pregnant women or women who may become pregnant.
    Alaska Board of Game 2015 tour... "Kicking the can down the road"
    http://www.alaskabackcountryhunters.org/

  18. #18
    webmaster Michael Strahan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 1999
    Location
    Anchorage, Alaska
    Posts
    5,765

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by homerdave View Post
    though ling do not live nearly as long as yellow-eye and shortraker rockfish ( over 100 years in some cases, commonly over 75) they do live significantly longer than 14 years. 20 is a number often cited in for upper age limit, though Milton Love says over 35. as with halibut, the females are larger, and live longer, with about 1/2 reaching sexual maturity at 4 years of age, but not until 10 yrs is it 100%. the larger older females spawn earlier (giving their offspring a longer growing season) and lay more eggs, over 400,000, than the smaller younger females.
    Like huge halibut, every time you take a really big ling you are killing off the best spawners.
    Lingcod are extremely sensitive to overfishing and the adults tend to have very strong site fidelity. transported lingcod have been known to return to the site of capture from nearly 10 miles away in less than 24 hrs.
    Tagged lingcod are consistently recaptured in the same areas.
    The entire west coast lingcod fishery is a shadow of it's past self, we don't need to look far or far back to see what overfishing can do to lings.
    They are also pretty high in mercury content, and should not be fed to children, pregnant women or women who may become pregnant.
    Thanks, Dave! I stand corrected. My info said 14 years; what is your source? Not doubting you, just wanting to understand it better. Also I didn't know about the mercury issue. I wonder if that's less prevalent in Alaska, or do you know?

    As a side note, I am looking for some good ling pics for the site if anyone has something we can use?

    -Mike
    LOST CREEK COMPANY: Specializing in Alaska hunt consultation and planning for do-it-yourself hunts, fully outfitted hunts, and guided hunts.
    CLICK HERE to send me a private message.
    Web Address: http://alaskaoutdoorssupersite.com/hunt-planner/
    Mob: 1 (907) 229-4501
    "Dream big, and dare to fail." -Norman Vaughan
    "I have climbed my mountain, but I must still live my life." - Tenzig Norgay

  19. #19
    Member homerdave's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    homer, alaska
    Posts
    3,922

    Default

    Mike my go-to books for in depth info are both by Milton Love, "Certainly More Than You Want to Know About The Fishes of The Pacific Coast", and "Rockfishes of The North Pacific". His writing style is really fun, and his books are really accessable. Ray
    Troll illustrated the rockfish book.
    I also use google with pretty specific search terms, "lingcod age" and "lingcod reproduction" both led me to some papers on the 'net.
    "Pacific Fishes of Canada" by Hart is also a valuable reference.
    As to the mercury info, it is alaska specific, i will attach it here. I have posted this several times so i am sure it is searchable on the forum. It should be a sticky.
    Attached Files Attached Files
    Alaska Board of Game 2015 tour... "Kicking the can down the road"
    http://www.alaskabackcountryhunters.org/

  20. #20

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Michael Strahan View Post
    Thanks, Dave! I stand corrected. My info said 14 years; what is your source? Not doubting you, just wanting to understand it better. Also I didn't know about the mercury issue. I wonder if that's less prevalent in Alaska, or do you know?

    As a side note, I am looking for some good ling pics for the site if anyone has something we can use?

    -Mike
    Hi Mike---I don't know if you're interested in this but I have a video of lings chasing jacks on my website (muttleycrewfishing.com) in the "Underwater Videos" section. You're welcome to use them if you'd like to.
    Year round saltwater fishing adventures in Homer, AK.
    http://muttleycrewfishing.com

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •