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Thread: Interior sheeting for cabins

  1. #1
    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
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    Default Interior sheeting for cabins

    I know there have been excellent threads on insulation and vapor barriers for remote cabins. One subject I don't recall having been adressed is what are people using for interior sheething. I've been sketching ideas for a small 12X16 stud wall cabin (not sure if I'll go 2X4 or 2X6) with fiberglass bat insulation. But what to cover it with on the inside?

    It seems like sheetrock would be too heavy and fragile to pull on a snowmachine trail, but I'm I off base with that assumption?

    I don't see the fire protection benefit of rock on a small say 12X16 single room cabin. If you can't out before the fire has caused structural failure, well, you just aren't getting out.
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    Member Laker Taker's Avatar
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    I would definitely use 2x6 for your exterior walls.
    I used 3/8" rough sawn plywood with pine batten strips for our interior wall finishes.P1000427.jpg

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    Supporting Member Amigo Will's Avatar
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    I used 1x4" and 1x6" or what ever fit.You can NOT have to much wood inside for sticking nails,screws and hooks as you always need a place to hang on more thing or shelf
    Now left only to be a turd in the forrest and the circle will be complete.Use me as I have used you

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    My cabin is framed in 2x4. My heating capacity exceeds what the space needs as is so there's little benefit in improving the insulation.

    My original interior wall finish was cheap prefinished 4x8 paneling. It worked great for nearly 20 years. Wifey and I wanted to brighten it up so I ripped the cheap stuff down and used 1x6 T&G pine and finished it with a water based acrylic semi-gloss varnish. We like it. Other 1x6 benefits? Easy to transport, easy to handle, and easy to cut with a standard chop saw. Borrow a finish nailer (DeWalt battery nailers work great) and get after it.

    My concern with drywall was the interior moisture changes as the cabin is used intermittently during the winter. I wouldn't expect taped joints to last and I wouldn't be happy with that.

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    Member AKDoug's Avatar
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    I think that Mr. Pid has hit it all in his post.

    1x6 TNG can be a bit expensive, but it looks great and is easy to handle. You are looking at roughly $2.00/ sq ft for quality material you don't have to pick through. You could save money by going through the stock at the box stores if you have the time.

    7/16 OSB...?? I have several customers that have used it. Painted, it doesn't look half bad. Cheap at $.45/ sqft. ACX plywood looks even better at twice the price, but still half the price of 1x6TNG.

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    Really it depends what you want to look at, how smooth and tidy looking you want your walls and what you want the walls to accomplish. there are several types of trailer-type thin paneling that Pid mentioned, I don't care for their looks, and there is the functionality factor that Will mentions about hanging things, though keeping track of where your studs are is pretty simple. It hangs quickly if you want a quick finished wall surface it's your best bet, if you can live with looking at it. I'd rather look at plywood myself. you get used to the seams pretty quickly, and you can strip them with boards to make it look like board and batten if you want, or paint it.

    Sheet rock is code standard not for the residents but for the fire department so they can know if it's safe to enter a burning structure. And it is used because it's quick to make a smoothed finished wall, and easy to repair damages and paint so wives can change their mind on what color they want to look at every 2 weeks and keep the yuppie paint companies in the black. Sheet rock is a mold magnet. Avoid it.

    Board and batten was the previous standard, works well but requires a lot of wood. If you want to play with a chainsaw mill, it's not too hard to get set up and churn out boards that will work if you have access to some timber. for a place that's only a few hundred square feet it wouldn't take too long and you'd learn something, but I'm guessing you will go a different route.

    If you're committed to a stick frame structure, and I am thinking you probably have money to spend (versus time), go for the T&G, it's a quick install and looks nice. I recommend keeping the stain very light, or just natural tone with a high quality polyurethane or varathane finish. Dry Creek near delta churns out nice local spruce T&G that is a lot better than the imported pine stuff.


    Or haul 3 sided logs in and get all in one. A structure of that size the logs would be easy to haul in and build with.

    6" logs = 2x4, 8" = 2x6. plus you get thermal mass and ventilation. Hard to improve on simple wood structures.

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    Member cdubbin's Avatar
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    I used 3/8" CDX for exterior and interior panelling; at about $10 bucks a sheet, the price was right, and it looks great trimmed out and painted. Makes a very rigid and lightweight structure.
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    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
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    Thanks for the input, the 1X6 t&g sounds like a nice way to go. I'm just trying to ball park idea of what I'm looking at in regards to numbers of loads to haul in, and labor to put it all together.

    As to the mention of a chainsaw mill, one of the reasons I picked up my Husky 181 was with the thought that the powerhead would be able to run a sawmill. Depending on the trees on the lot, as well as what I could feasibly haul in, milling on site is certainly an option and something I'd be looking at doing to one degree or another.

    For some reason log cabins have never appealed to me, but post and beam does. So milling some logs on site to make 8" or 12" beams might just do the trick.
    Those that are successful in Alaska are those who are flexible, and allow the reality of life in Alaska to shape their dreams, vs. trying to force their dreams on the reality of Alaska.

    If you have a tenuous grasp of reality, Alaska is not for you.

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    I used 1x6 tongue and grove cedar, nice and light, smells great too. But you have to be careful, it breaks easily, I had it shipped up from Oregon, and trucked to the site. Oh yea, my friend owns the saw mill.

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    I used 1/4" AC plywood with a clear water base finish. Used 1X4 for trim.
    Tim

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    I used 7/16 OSB. I used the dull side, since mud didn't stick too well to the shiny side. I made sure to use a high hiding primer before mudding, since otherwise the OSB holds A LOT of mud. Afterwords, with texture, you cannot tell the difference from sheetrock.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Akheloce View Post
    I used 7/16 OSB. I used the dull side, since mud didn't stick too well to the shiny side. I made sure to use a high hiding primer before mudding, since otherwise the OSB holds A LOT of mud. Afterwords, with texture, you cannot tell the difference from sheetrock.
    I'm curious, does the place you did this in freeze and thaw or is it heated all winter? did you use paper tape? how many years have the seams held for?

    I've heard of mudding plywood, but curious how the seams would hold up to freeze/thaw. Also, you might want to keep the mud from freezing when hauling it in (at least I assume it wouldn't bond as well if it froze, maybe a drywall guy can confirm or deny).

    Also, did you let the plywood cure before mudding or was it fairly green? curious if the shrinkage would be an issue.



    lots of folks seem to like the plywood. If you keep your eyes open, you can eventually find a bundle of 1/2" cdx that has a pretty darn nice c side, sometimes looks as nice as a-c, and of course the price is right, far cheaper than any thickness of ac. a bit heavier to haul than the thinner stuff but not a big deal if you're hauling on the ground, and screws will hold very well for shelves and such.

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    Member Akheloce's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by andweav View Post
    I'm curious, does the place you did this in freeze and thaw or is it heated all winter? did you use paper tape? how many years have the seams held for?

    I've heard of mudding plywood, but curious how the seams would hold up to freeze/thaw. Also, you might want to keep the mud from freezing when hauling it in (at least I assume it wouldn't bond as well if it froze, maybe a drywall guy can confirm or deny).

    Also, did you let the plywood cure before mudding or was it fairly green? curious if the shrinkage would be an issue.



    lots of folks seem to like the plywood. If you keep your eyes open, you can eventually find a bundle of 1/2" cdx that has a pretty darn nice c side, sometimes looks as nice as a-c, and of course the price is right, far cheaper than any thickness of ac. a bit heavier to haul than the thinner stuff but not a big deal if you're hauling on the ground, and screws will hold very well for shelves and such.

    In My case, I used the blue mesh tape because I had a few rolls of it. It is a cabin which is not occupied all year... t gets -35-+90 swings in temp. I used OSB, which i consider cured, rather than green plywood. I also hauled my mud in as I needed it. If the mud froze on the trip out, I discarded it. Most of the mud I actually used was brought out in summer.

    So far, 4 years of blue mesh tape, and intermittant use, it still looks good.

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    I know of several weekend cabins with sheetrock walls. They seem to be holding up fine with no mold issues or excessive cracking. A good foundation is key to preventing cracks. You can haul sheetrock just fine with the right sled and if you pick your conditions (cold).

    Our 12x16 cabin has 1/4" 4' x 8' beadboard sheets, which I put a tung oil varnish on. It was a real eye opener when I threw the scraps in the burn pit. I don't think that wood would have burned any faster if it was soaked in gasoline! Since then, I'm real anal about fire in the cabin and figure if it does catch, the best we can do is run out the door with what we are wearing. We're fortunate in that we have a nearby cabin we could go to if that were to happen. It is something to think about though.

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    Member Queen of Kings's Avatar
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    I have sheet rock on the first portion of my cabin and as all cabins move, I do get cracks in some joints. fix them and they crack again. ON the addition I am going with 3/8 AC plywood and 1/2 x 2 batting on the joints and ever 16" to mee the studs for looks. My original ceiling was1 x 6 pine and that works great. cost Sheet rock, is cheep, AC pyly wood about 1/2 again as much and pin is twice as much.
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    at sbs they have brushed cedar in 4x8 sheets it is great looking finish wood and cost about the same as cedar 1x6 but goes way faster it is in several lodges if you go to www.northwoodslodge.com there new game room is covered in it... it looks great.

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    .net not .com sorry

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    Default Cabin Walls

    Used pine T&G from Lowes for the downstairs. And Birch T&G from Prophet Milling in Wasilla. Neither floor is done but happy with the way they are coming out. Not light though as I over built and there is 7/16s OSB behind the T&G.
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