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Thread: Is there a way to split rifle brass cleanly???

  1. #1
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    Default Is there a way to split rifle brass cleanly???

    After much fidling with the precision mic's, i have decided that spliting the necks of a few cases is a better system.
    Problem is i cannot seem to get a clean set of splits in the neck and shoulder area.
    could someone explain the best way to properly get 3-4 straight cuts down the neckand into the shoulders of rifle brass.
    I do not have a dremil set up to cut these..
    Thanks for the help.
    Furbearer

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    Member AKDoug's Avatar
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    I have only cut brass completely in half for educational purposes. I used a bandsaw to do it. I'm having trouble imagining what you are trying to do, but the only way I can think of making slits in a neck would be to use a dremel. I imagine there is some type of jewelers saw out there that could do it.

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    What Doug said. The bras is small, easy to cut, thin; it wants to grab at a saw. You can do it but use a really light pressure.
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    Quote Originally Posted by AKDoug View Post
    I'm having trouble imagining what you are trying to do...
    I believe it was recommended to him in another thread that making a depth gauge in this manner could be a good method of measuring his distance to the lands, as an alternative to a commercial gauge, which is true. Personally though, I'll stick with the Hornady Lock n Load gauge for simplicity, accuracy, and ease of use.

    As for cutting a case neck, my first choice would be a jewelers saw (and if I had owned one, I might not have purchased my Hornady gauge...).
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    Default Xacto Razor saw

    The Exacto razor saws are a MUST for the reloading bench and handy a lot of other places. They have a very thin blade with a backing and are the best thing going for sectioning brass and triming brass with a trim die. They come in various widths and teeth per inch. I got mine at the hobby shop in Benson behind REI; I think they moved recently.

    I used on a while back to cut off a screw with a stripped head in a set of scope rings. It was thin enough to fit in the gap and cut the screw off without damaging anything.

    I don't recommend many things but the Razor saws are without equal.
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    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
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    The key to cutting any thin material cleanlly is to use a very fine tooth saw blade.

    But as others have said, other than for curiosity, cutting a case typcially doesn't have any benefit for doing diagnostics on your brass or your chamber.
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    Razor saw it is...
    Now i just need to find one in local fairbanks..
    Thanks for the help.
    furbearer

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    I tried a hacksaw to section some brass this summer...the effort and result was pretty pathetic! then a week later I did a tile job for a buddy and used a wet diamond circular table saw with a solid (not slotted) blade to cut the tile pieces...That got me thinking of when I once worked in a tubbing factory and used dry diamond circular bladed saws to section brass tubing for testing and to scrap out longer brass tubes that did'nt pass testing...Well sure enough used the saw wet to keep brass cool as I was feeding it by hand!...wow wee what a difference, completely split a 375 H&H case from neck to base, quickly, easily, smoothly, straight, very little burr!

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    Moderator LuJon's Avatar
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    A fiber laser gets my vote! Sure the razor saw might save you a few (hundred) thousand but let's face it that little person on Austin powers didn't get famous for humping a razor saw!

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    Quote Originally Posted by LuJon View Post
    A fiber laser gets my vote! Sure the razor saw might save you a few (hundred) thousand but let's face it that little person on Austin powers didn't get famous for humping a razor saw!
    Thatís what Iím talkin bout, and turn it up to 11 too maybe we can melt that sucker in a flash!
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    I have used a Foredom to split cases and it works well but if you don't have a Dremel ,Foredom or other tiny disc cutter your probably going to have to try one of the tiny saws. I would recommend making only 2 slices down the neck as more can make the bullet looser than you want.

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    Member broncoformudv's Avatar
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    If you are just trying to find your bullet seating depth take a triangular file and make a cut down the case neck only about halfway. This gives enough tension to keep the bullet in the case yet still allow it seat in the case neck after hitting the lands.

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    This method is one of the oldest "tricks" in reloading. Everything has been used from side snipes to end mills.

    In My opinion the best way today- If you have any battery powered hand drill... go to Fred's or Wally and get a diamond cut-off wheel for the dremil tool (should be about $10) and just chuck it up in your drill. A vise is nice for holding the case, but not 100% necessary, pliers will work.
    For the slots in your case- I like to cut twice--- which makes four slots. Go slow, and makes sure you deburr inside and out before use. And also roll the neck area over the edge of something to increase Neck Tension.
    I also like to use a sharpie to colour the enter projectile before using. You will get nice clean marks for seating depth, and should get a nice ring for throat depth.

    Remember to have fun, and be safe.

    Chris

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