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Thread: Military and draw tags

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    Member Roger's Avatar
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    Default Military and draw tags

    Was reading on another forum was not sure if it is true or not and I could care less I was just curious. I'm not wanting to start a hate thread or anything just for my own information. But can someone in the military just just moved up in the past 3-5 months here put in for resident tags ?
    PEOPLE SAY I HAVE A.D.D I DON'T UNDERSTA.....OH LOOK A MOOSE !!!

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    Member Jason in Anchorage's Avatar
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    I was stationed there from 2003-2007...then, the rules stated you had to be living in the state for 1 year before you gained residency hunting status. You did get half priced tags during that first year.
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    Moderator Daveinthebush's Avatar
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    Correct you have to be physically in the state 1 full year, 365 days. The military can though, hunt on military lands. Another thing, if you do buy a non-resident tag for something, say a moose. If you do not take a moose you can still use that tag for a lessor dollar value tag, say a black bear.

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  4. #4

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    Quote Originally Posted by Roger View Post
    Was reading on another forum was not sure if it is true or not and I could care less I was just curious. I'm not wanting to start a hate thread or anything just for my own information. But can someone in the military just just moved up in the past 3-5 months here put in for resident tags ?
    No. I believe the do get "resident" prices for a hunting license and, as Roger said, 1/2 price (off non-res prices) tags. They still have the same residency requirements everyone else has when it comes to applying for or hunting "resident" permits or hunts.

  5. #5
    Member Roger's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by anchskier View Post
    They still have the same residency requirements everyone else has when it comes to applying for or hunting "resident" permits or hunts.
    That's my answer then.Thanks was just wondering
    PEOPLE SAY I HAVE A.D.D I DON'T UNDERSTA.....OH LOOK A MOOSE !!!

  6. #6
    Member broncoformudv's Avatar
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    Like everyone else said Roger you us military have to be a resident just like everyone else.

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    Member bushrat's Avatar
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    May as well post the full skinny:
    http://www.adfg.alaska.gov/index.cfm?adfg=huntlicense.military
    Military Licenses

    Q: Can Military personnel who have established Alaska residency and are then involuntarily transferred to a military assignment in another state lose their Alaska residency? What if they obtain a "resident" hunting or fishing license in the other state that is specially provided to members of the military?
    A: Military personnel who are transferred to Alaska can obtain "resident" hunting and fishing licenses two ways:

    1. Per AS 16.05.940(26)(A), a person can qualify by maintaining their domicile in the state for the preceding 12 consecutive months, and not claiming residency or obtaining benefits of residency in another state, territory or country. This type of residency is indefinite and may be permanent if the qualifications continue to be met.
    2. Per AS 16.05.940(26)(C), a member of the military service or United States Coast Guard and their dependents may purchase a "resident" license after being stationed in Alaska for 12 consecutive months without any intent to make Alaska their domicile, and in spite of their claiming domicile in another state. This type of residency is temporary and expires immediately upon a transfer to another state.

    Once residency is established, it can be maintained even if the person is absent from the state, as long as certain conditions are met. Per AS 16.05.415:

    1. (a) In AS 16.05.330 - 16.05.430, a person is a resident if the person
      1. (1) is physically present in the state with the intent to remain in the state indefinitely and to make a home in the state;
      2. (2) has maintained the person's domicile in the state for the 12 consecutive months immediately preceding the application for a license;
      3. (3) is not claiming residency in another state, territory, or country; and
      4. (4) is not obtaining benefits under a claim of residency in another state, territory, or country

    2. (b) A person who establishes residency in the state under (a) of this section remains a resident during an absence from the state unless during the absence the person
      1. (1) establishes or claims residency in another state, territory, or country; or
      2. (2) performs an act, or is absent under circumstances, that is inconsistent with the intent required under (a) of this section.

    Military personnel who have attained residency while stationed in Alaska and are then subsequently involuntarily transferred to another state, may continue to purchase an Alaskan resident sport license. However while stationed elsewhere, they cannot do anything to negate their residency in Alaska while stationed in another state. For example they need to: retain Alaska as Home of Residence with the military, keep their Alaska driver's license (if legally possible), Alaska voters registration card, Alaska vehicle registration, etc.
    Some states allow military personnel to purchase resident sport licenses based solely on their military status without meeting the residency conditions of nonmilitary persons. The purchase of such a license in many states will not negate the Alaskan residency status of military personnel stationed there.
    The State of Alaska Attorney General's office has looked at each state’s residency requirements and has determined that the following states ARE NOT approved to purchase that state’s resident license and still qualify for a resident license in Alaska: Alabama, Iowa, Louisiana, Minnesota (for moose and elk), New York, Oklahoma, Utah, Washington, and West Virginia. For all other states, the military resident must not have done anything else to negate their Alaskan residency (see above information).
    Please Note: If a state changes their military resident requirement, the above states may no longer qualify or may now qualify for a State of Alaska resident license. The information on this site for various states may not be current. Please review the military license requirements each year for the state where you are currently stationed to ensure they have not changed.
    If a military person living outside Alaska who has met Alaska’s residency definition above plans a fishing/hunting trip to Alaska and wants to purchase a resident Alaska sport license, they must:

    • meet the conditions above if they purchased a resident license in their new state based on their military status, and
    • be in one of the state's the Attorney General’s office has approved.

    If you have any questions, please contact ADF&G Licensing.



  8. #8
    Member broncoformudv's Avatar
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    Great post Mark that clears up a lot of questions that are posted up on here throughout the year.

    A MOD should make that a sticky!

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by anchskier View Post
    No. I believe the do get "resident" prices for a hunting license and, as Roger said, 1/2 price (off non-res prices) tags. They still have the same residency requirements everyone else has when it comes to applying for or hunting "resident" permits or hunts.
    Nonresident military hunting license is $25.00 which is, of course the same price as a resident license. Tags use to be half price but now are the same price as a resident pays. It changed 2 years ago. Guide requirements are still effective and as others have posted, cannot apply for a resident tag.

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