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Thread: Moose Hunt

  1. #1
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    Default Moose Hunt

    What river would be your river of choice for a moose hunt?

    The Tonzona in unit 19D

    Or

    The King Salmon in unit 17B

  2. #2
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    Default

    I thought this is the reason for this forum.

    Alaska Float Hunting Forum

    (4 Viewing)
    This forum is for the discussion of all things related to float hunting in Alaska; area selection, equipment, river navigation, hunting tactics, etc.



    Am I wrong? Please let me know.

  3. #3
    Moderator kingfisherktn's Avatar
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    Default

    You are not wrong, sadly we're all pretty secretive on found areas but hopefully someone who knows these rivers can offer you some advice.

    Good luck.


    Quote Originally Posted by jetfun View Post
    I thought this is the reason for this forum.

    Alaska Float Hunting Forum

    (4 Viewing)
    This forum is for the discussion of all things related to float hunting in Alaska; area selection, equipment, river navigation, hunting tactics, etc.



    Am I wrong? Please let me know.

  4. #4
    webmaster Michael Strahan's Avatar
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    Apr 1999
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    Anchorage, Alaska
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    5,767

    Default

    Jet,

    You are the best person to answer this question. But in order to do so, you have to do your research first. I received your email, where you mentioned that you purchased my float hunting book some time ago (thanks, by the way!). The book is a good start, because it paints the whole planning picture for you. I have outlined the hunt planning process on our Hunt Planning Pages here on Outdoors Directory. I would have a look at those pages. While you are there, note the menu on the left side of the page, which outlines other related steps in the process, including the use of a hunt planner, a timeline, choosing a location, links to management reports, recommended book and print resources, sources of information, and a special section on the use of color infrared images for hunt planning. In addition to that information, you also need to know how to hunt the river, and how to hunt the particular species of interest. Our site contains pages on every big-game species, including how to hunt them and general background information of use to you in the planning process. It's all linked off of our main Hunting Page, in the left-hand menu. I should mention that our species information is a work in progress, and we are looking for writers who want to help with this area. If anyone out there is interested in giving us a hand, drop me a line via PM or email, and let's talk!

    In a nutshell, your research should cover two kinds of data, which includes (but is not limited to) at least the following information:

    NON-PERISHABLE DATA
    • GMU
    • Mileage
    • Gradient
    • Whitewater Rating
    • Known hazards
    • Recommended experience level
    • General description of river
    • Terrain and vegetation
    • Available species
    • Closest commercial services (air charter, boat rental, camp rental, etc.)
    • Recommended boats

    PERISHABLE DATA
    • Bull / cow ratios
    • Overall health of game population
    • Density / sq mi of game animals
    • Water levels
    • Guide activity
    • Hunting pressure
    • Success rates / harvest data
    • Migration patterns

    The non-perishable data is included in all fifty river descriptions in the book, and directions on where to obtain the perishable data are included in the hunt planning chapter. When you have gathered all that information together, you are in a position to decide which river to focus on.

    The intent of my hunt planning service is to coach people through this process, providing them with the tools and direction so they are gathering the information and developing relationships with the right commercial operators. This information helps them plan their next hunt and the one after that, and so on.

    It involves MUCH more than simply coming up with a river to float. In fact, if that's all I did, I would do you a disservice by creating the impression that all you have to do is show up on the right river, and it will all work out. That is far from the case.

    In summary, most "where to go" questions in our forums are met with stalling or silence. This is because most successful Alaska hunters have put a lot of time and effort in to researching "their" areas, and are understandably reluctant to give that away. So on the surface your question sounds simple, but it really is not. The decision of which river to float, especially considering the expense and time involved in putting together an Alaska expedition hunt, is the end product of a lot of work.

    Sorry for the length of this, but you deserve a good overview of this process. Best of luck as you plan this hunt. For most of us, the planning is the best part!

    Take care,

    -Mike
    LOST CREEK COMPANY: Specializing in Alaska hunt consultation and planning for do-it-yourself hunts, fully outfitted hunts, and guided hunts.
    CLICK HERE to send me a private message.
    Web Address: http://alaskaoutdoorssupersite.com/hunt-planner/
    Mob: 1 (907) 229-4501
    "Dream big, and dare to fail." -Norman Vaughan
    "I have climbed my mountain, but I must still live my life." - Tenzig Norgay

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