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Thread: Question for all you "Off the Grid-ers)

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    Default Question for all you "Off the Grid-ers)

    How many of you that have left the luxuries of commercial power, left the luxury of gun powder? Traditional archery and how many of you non-townies have ventured there?

    Just being flippant with the titles but really interested in the core of the questions.

    George

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    Member alaska4ever's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by George Riddle View Post
    How many of you that have left the luxuries of commercial power, left the luxury of gun powder? Traditional archery and how many of you non-townies have ventured there?

    Just being flippant with the titles but really interested in the core of the questions.

    George
    George, I think you are about to wake a sleeping giant, LOL. This sounds like a thread that will go downhill real quick. LOL
    JOHN

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    I don't live off the grid, yet. Having said that, I believe the reasons for living a simple life off the grid are more for personal satisfaction and longing for quiet, simple living. You don't see clusters of houses that are off the grid.

    Non-gridders are more or less loners. Being a loner does not mean you don't appreciate modern conveniences...like gun powder. Probably more gridders using bows than non-gridders. If the gridder doesn't get a critter, there's always Freddies. The non-gridder misses and it's stone soup.

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    Quote Originally Posted by 257wby View Post
    I don't live off the grid, yet. Having said that, I believe the reasons for living a simple life off the grid are more for personal satisfaction and longing for quiet, simple living. You don't see clusters of houses that are off the grid.

    Non-gridders are more or less loners. Being a loner does not mean you don't appreciate modern conveniences...like gun powder. Probably more gridders using bows than non-gridders. If the gridder doesn't get a critter, there's always Freddies. The non-gridder misses and it's stone soup.
    Thumbs up.
    JOHN

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    John, I dont see why this thread should get devisive or derisive....

    I live off the grid. I dont live remote or have to eat porkies or any of that. Heck I could live IN town and live off the grid. Just shut off the power and put in a woodstove, lol. Every morning, I leave my non grid home, get in my gas sipping commuter and drive to where the JOBS are. Yes, I am a conformist, lol. But my wife and my kids eat and are afforded a good life. Sure we could chop our firewood with kitchen knifes and scrape bear fat for our stone lamps, but we dont need to...

    I agree 100 percent with 257 to say that most "traditional" bowhunters or muzzleloaders are townies with the time and luxury to indulge in a "hobby". Folks who live out and beyond, and rely on what they can provide for themselves, typically use the cheapest most effective method available, right Stranger???

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    Quote Originally Posted by dkwarthog View Post
    John, I dont see why this thread should get devisive or derisive....

    I live off the grid. I dont live remote or have to eat porkies or any of that. Heck I could live IN town and live off the grid. Just shut off the power and put in a woodstove, lol. Every morning, I leave my non grid home, get in my gas sipping commuter and drive to where the JOBS are. Yes, I am a conformist, lol. But my wife and my kids eat and are afforded a good life. Sure we could chop our firewood with kitchen knifes and scrape bear fat for our stone lamps, but we dont need to...

    I agree 100 percent with 257 to say that most "traditional" bowhunters or muzzleloaders are townies with the time and luxury to indulge in a "hobby". Folks who live out and beyond, and rely on what they can provide for themselves, typically use the cheapest most effective method available, right Stranger???
    Just thinking about the term, "townies". Led to alot of negative posts in ice fishing. Hope I don't start something, sorry George. My lips are zipped.
    JOHN

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    Ahh. I missed that thread.

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    Though my situation is not the same as most off the grid-ers. I enjoy Archery, and have bow hunted and fished many times back in ND. Yet unless I had no ammo or needed more stealth, it is hard to give up a gun for most game. So I guess my answer would be I keep a gun and use it only when I need it and would use Traditional Archery. Worst come to worst you could always go with a few light throwing javelins and a long sturdy spear

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    Quote Originally Posted by dkwarthog View Post
    Ahh. I missed that thread.
    Check out figure 8
    JOHN

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    Thanks John, I'll check it out.

    Quote Originally Posted by lamontge View Post
    Though my situation is not the same as most off the grid-ers. I enjoy Archery, and have bow hunted and fished many times back in ND. Yet unless I had no ammo or needed more stealth, it is hard to give up a gun for most game. So I guess my answer would be I keep a gun and use it only when I need it and would use Traditional Archery. Worst come to worst you could always go with a few light throwing javelins and a long sturdy spear
    I like to bowhunt, I also like to just shoot my bow in the backyard. But it has wheels and whatnot, so its still not "traditional"...I guess. Where I grew up in Northern Michigan, a guy could put venison on the table consistently and relatively easily with bow, in Alaska the opportunities can be fewer and farther between. When I "seriously" need to put some meat in the freezer, I grab the 338 or the 22wm... :P

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    Quote Originally Posted by alaska4ever View Post
    Check out figure 8
    ****, I did it again, my lips are sewn this time.
    JOHN

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    Quote Originally Posted by alaska4ever View Post
    ****, I did it again, my lips are sewn this time.
    Dont worry John, it deosnt count when you are talking about Road Huggers!

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    There would be something odd about a stick and stringer living off the grid and being on the internet.

    I'm sure there are a few do it all the hard way types left, but I don't think they'd have any spare time to be suring the net
    Those that are successful in Alaska are those who are flexible, and allow the reality of life in Alaska to shape their dreams, vs. trying to force their dreams on the reality of Alaska.

    If you have a tenuous grasp of reality, Alaska is not for you.

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