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Thread: Anchoring pop up shelters

  1. #1

    Default Anchoring pop up shelters

    What have you guys come up with that's easier than those screw in anchors that come with the shelters? Mostly I get lazy and don't bother using anything which can get real comical when the winds pop up at of know where towards evening. I was thinking of making something you can drop in a shallow drilled hole but haven't settled on anything yet.
    "If your not the lead dog.... the view never changes"

  2. #2
    Member Hayduke's Avatar
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    I bring a cordless drill and pop pilot holes. Makes the screws much easier!

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    Member DRIFTER_016's Avatar
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    Or spend the money on some ice climbing screws and leave the drill at home.
    Ice climbing screws are very easy to put in by hand unlike those things that come with the shelters.
    They are a little spendy but you can purchase knock offs for anchoring shelters at less than 1/2 the cost of mountaineering ones.
    I wouldn't use them for climbing iced up waterfalls though.

    http://ultimateiceanchor.com

  4. #4

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    I'm sure they are worth it. At that price they would have to be. Just let me catch my breath a little and I'll look at them again.
    "If your not the lead dog.... the view never changes"

  5. #5
    Member gutleap's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by alaskanassasin View Post
    What have you guys come up with that's easier than those screw in anchors that come with the shelters?
    I like those screw in anchors that come with the Eskimo huts. If you put a little downward pressure on them with one hand while turning with the other hand, they go in very easy. They are even easier to remove.

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    Member AKnook's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by gutleap View Post
    I like those screw in anchors that come with the Eskimo huts. If you put a little downward pressure on them with one hand while turning with the other hand, they go in very easy. They are even easier to remove.
    I agree. They are so easy to screw in and screw out. I have never had a problem with them.

  7. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by AKnook View Post
    I agree. They are so easy to screw in and screw out. I have never had a problem with them.
    I agree also. it was surprisingly easy.

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    Member sayak's Avatar
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    No complaints re: the Eskimo ice screws, though ease of penetration does vary with the type of ice.

  9. #9

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    Ok let me rephrase it... Anyone who doesn't LOVE their screw in anchors have a better idea? It wasn't a vote for or against people..
    "If your not the lead dog.... the view never changes"

  10. #10
    Member Hayduke's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by alaskanassasin View Post
    have a better idea?
    Give me all your gear and it won't be a headache any longer!

  11. #11
    Member JediMasterSalmonSlayer's Avatar
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    rough crowd in here...haha
    http://www.myfishingpictures.com/watermark.php?file=133776
    Jedi Salmon Powers Activated!
    www.alaskansalmonslayers.com


  12. #12
    Member JOAT's Avatar
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    There is no better idea than the new style Eskimo ice screws and the existing shelter hardware. They cut in like a hot knife through butter and take only a few seconds to place each one.

    One thing I did to my Eskimo shelter is to place a brass grommet on the center of the outer flap on the vent holes above the windows. I place the shelter with one vent upwind to make sure there is a cross flow ventilation. Anyway, I have about 6-7 feet of bright orange parachute cord run off that grommet to a sliding tent-style guy adjuster. Place one ice screw on each side of the shelter a few feet out from the midpoint and then attach these guylines and it holds everything down pretty well. The reason for adding the grommet at this location is that it holds that vent flap open into the wind. I noticed that they don't naturally stay open very well and if you put one upwind, the wind pushes it closed and you get no ventilation.

    If you get heavy winds, you can add 2 more screws to the upwind corners of the shelter, or all 4 corners if you were so inclined. Of course Eskimo has the tabs for doing that on the inside, so it's really simple to keep fishing with one hand and add an ice screw or 2 from the inside with the other hand as the situation dictates.

    I can't imagine anything could be any easier.
    Winter is Coming...

    Go GeocacheAlaska!

  13. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by JOAT View Post
    There is no better idea than the new style Eskimo ice screws and the existing shelter hardware. They cut in like a hot knife through butter and take only a few seconds to place each one.

    One thing I did to my Eskimo shelter is to place a brass grommet on the center of the outer flap on the vent holes above the windows. I place the shelter with one vent upwind to make sure there is a cross flow ventilation. Anyway, I have about 6-7 feet of bright orange parachute cord run off that grommet to a sliding tent-style guy adjuster. Place one ice screw on each side of the shelter a few feet out from the midpoint and then attach these guylines and it holds everything down pretty well. The reason for adding the grommet at this location is that it holds that vent flap open into the wind. I noticed that they don't naturally stay open very well and if you put one upwind, the wind pushes it closed and you get no ventilation.

    If you get heavy winds, you can add 2 more screws to the upwind corners of the shelter, or all 4 corners if you were so inclined. Of course Eskimo has the tabs for doing that on the inside, so it's really simple to keep fishing with one hand and add an ice screw or 2 from the inside with the other hand as the situation dictates.

    I can't imagine anything could be any easier.
    Anyway you can post pics?

  14. #14
    Member JOAT's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by poarch0 View Post
    Anyway you can post pics?
    Yeah, I actually thought about taking some pics of the setup last week when I had it setup inside drying out after my last trip. Got distracted with other clean up chores and forgot about it when I folded her back up and stowed it in the bag. On my next outing, I'll try to remember to grab a couple pictures and post them.
    Winter is Coming...

    Go GeocacheAlaska!

  15. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by JOAT View Post
    Yeah, I actually thought about taking some pics of the setup last week when I had it setup inside drying out after my last trip. Got distracted with other clean up chores and forgot about it when I folded her back up and stowed it in the bag. On my next outing, I'll try to remember to grab a couple pictures and post them.
    thx i packed snow around mine but that takes a lot of time

  16. #16

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    A few good ideas but I was thinking of building an anchor I could just drop in a hole I dug with the auger since it was already out and running. I would just drill 4 more holes 3 or so inches deep (so as not to be a hazard for stepping into) about where your ice screws would go, then use something I've made that would catch the edge but was easy in easy out. I have a couple ideas but thought I'd see if anyone had already come up with something. If I get something to work that wouldn't come loose if the line goes slack I'll let everyone know.
    "If your not the lead dog.... the view never changes"

  17. #17

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    Quote Originally Posted by Hayduke View Post
    Give me all your gear and it won't be a headache any longer!
    It isn't a headache now, I just like to move around more than most so I'm looking for something faster and easier.
    "If your not the lead dog.... the view never changes"

  18. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by Hayduke View Post
    I bring a cordless drill and pop pilot holes. Makes the screws much easier!
    Yeah that works good and you can buy an adapter for the drill as well, but I'm trying to get away from having to bring the drill all the time.
    "If your not the lead dog.... the view never changes"

  19. #19
    Member JOAT's Avatar
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    Your plight does make sense in trying to work out something with a hole you punch with the power auger. I actually do bring my 18v lithium Makita out with me, but then I use a standard auger with a 1/2" drill chuck adapter. Talk about packing light; that drill will push a hand auger through the ice in a hurry. A bit slower than a gas powered auger, but it still works great. It gets rough towards late season and I might have to swap batteries to punch beyond 2 feet of ice. I always carry 3 batteries, JIC.

    That said, I originally thought I should bring a 1/4" bit to punch starter holes for those ice screws. But I've found it takes 3 times longer to swap drill bits and punch a pilot hole vs just grabbing the screw and putting it in. Like I said, those new Eskimo screws are aggressive little buggers.

    I'd think that just a quick spin with your auger's center point until the blades first contact the ice would be more than enough pilot hole for the ice screws.

    Anyway, a thought I was just having about your idea... what if you just bring some lengths of cheap 100% cotton twine. You get your fishing holes plugged and then make a couple dimples about an inch or two deep. Take a chunk of cotton twine and drop a couple feet of it into the water to saturate it. Then place the dripping wet end into your anchor hole in a wad in the bottom. Step on it to kinda smash it into the ice and let it freeze. I bet it would be frozen solid within a couple minutes under most conditions. Then you setup your tent and tie the free end of the string to the shelter's exterior eye bolts. When it's time to go, just cut the lines at the edge of the hole. The frozen bit you leave behind is going to rot away next summer.

    You'd have to experiment with this a bit to see how much hole vs water would be needed to make a solid enough anchor, assuming it would even work at all. Just brainstorming here, so it might have no merit whatsoever. Hard tellin'; not knowin'.

    Winter is Coming...

    Go GeocacheAlaska!

  20. #20
    Member gutleap's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by alaskanassasin View Post
    A few good ideas but I was thinking of building an anchor I could just drop in a hole I dug with the auger since it was already out and running.
    Perhaps these might work. They are called ice angel anchors. You can buy them online for about $11. They have teeth that bite into the side of the hole as you pull up. If you are handy at fabrication, you could also make them real easy out of some aluminum stock.


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