Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 25

Thread: Fuel transfer options while at sea?

  1. #1

    Default Fuel transfer options while at sea?

    We usually carry a couple of 30 gallon drums on the back deck for extended running a couple of times a year. Right now we've been using a small hand crank pump to transfer gas from the drums to the main boat tank, it is messy and a PIA.

    Anyone have any other tried/true options? (other than plumbing them in direct to the fuel system)

    Thanks.

  2. #2
    Member Ronster's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Valdez
    Posts
    684

    Default

    For long trips I carry two 15 gallon polys. I use one of the shake it siphon tubes and it works pretty well. Ive thought about plumbing in another tank direct to the main cell but that it a lot of work and extra $ that can be spent in other places.

  3. #3
    Member Ak Bird Brain's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Sterling, AK
    Posts
    359

    Default

    I use 15 gallon drums so their easier to handle. If you look at the center of the bung plugs they should have 3/4 inch threads, I just drill a 1/2 inch hole through the cap without damaging those threads. Screw in a brass 3/4 inch NPT to garden hose adapter with a shut off valve. When I need to refuel I just attach a short section of hose and slowly tip the drum to let it gravity feed into my tank. It helps if you have 1 person to hold the hose into the tank so it doesn't pop out, especially when you get to the bottom of the drum and hold it upside down to shake the last bit out. When its raining I run it through a water block funnel before it goes into the tank. When I'm not transferring fuel I keep the hose coiled up and connected to itself so nothing dribbles out and a cap on the drum valve so water doesn't get in. Total cost is about $10 per drum (each drum gets its own set up so I don't have to remember a bung wrench) beats the heck out of burnt out shoulders from hand pumping all afternoon.
    Give a man a fish and you feed him for a day,
    Teach a man to fish and he'll also learn to drink, lie, and avoid the honey do list.

  4. #4
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Tennessee
    Posts
    3,568

    Default

    I bought a 12 volt electrical fuel pump rated for gasoline off Ebay a couple of years ago for about $150. Spliced in a long extension cord and added a set of alligator clips. The outlet nozzle is either 7/8 or 1 inch and it will empty a 55 gallon drum in about 6-7 minutes tops. We use it on both the Thunderjet and Sea Sport and never had an issue with it.

  5. #5

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Ronster View Post
    For long trips I carry two 15 gallon polys. I use one of the shake it siphon tubes and it works pretty well. Ive thought about plumbing in another tank direct to the main cell but that it a lot of work and extra $ that can be spent in other places.
    Same for me. 15-gallon poly and siphon tube.

  6. #6
    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    5,594

    Default

    I have two inputs to my racor filter, both with valves. The extra tanks have q/c fittings, so I just hook them up to the portable tank line, and run it til it's dry. When I've used up the portable tanks, I switch the valves so that I'm running on the main tank. It takes less time to switch tanks than to desribe it, no mess, no fuss. The extra cost is pretty minimal.

    One of these



    One of these



    and then whatever you need to add to your fuel jug to draw fuel out of it.
    Those that are successful in Alaska are those who are flexible, and allow the reality of life in Alaska to shape their dreams, vs. trying to force their dreams on the reality of Alaska.

    If you have a tenuous grasp of reality, Alaska is not for you.

  7. #7
    Member Sobie2's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Juneau
    Posts
    1,039

    Default

    This question is especially relevant... look at the user's name!

    If you can have the 30 gal tanks higher than the boat's fuel tank, the Shake It Siphon Tubes as noted by Ronster are the way to go. Very clean, easy, fast, and simple.

    Sobie2

  8. #8
    Member Dan in Alaska's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    854

    Default

    We've always used 15-gal portable tanks and the shaker-siphons, but I like your idea of the quick disconnects, Paul. I still don't like storing the "empty" fuel jugs on the boat, so Chris and I are going to pull up the floor this spring and see about installing a second tank. The boat manufacturer says there is room for another 40-50gal tank under the floor, and we plan to plumb some sort of valve system so we can draw off the tanks separately. We'll probably hit you up for ideas this spring, when installation time gets here.

  9. #9
    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    5,594

    Default

    One thing I learned the second season with the boat is you want valves on both fuel lines. The first season I just had a valve on the main tank and figured the q/c on the second line would do the trick. But at some point the o-ring in the q/c cracked, and the engine was able to suck in just enough air through the crack to loose prime. Kinda disconcerting to be cruising along and then loose power. Doubling over the fuel line and keeping it kinked with vice grips did the trick until installing the second valve and a new q/c.

    I've been debating putting a second 20 gal tank in my boat, but it seems most of trips I can handle with the current tank and only occasionally do I need to carry additional fuel. I also hate the empty tanks on deck.
    Those that are successful in Alaska are those who are flexible, and allow the reality of life in Alaska to shape their dreams, vs. trying to force their dreams on the reality of Alaska.

    If you have a tenuous grasp of reality, Alaska is not for you.

  10. #10
    Member alaskabliss's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Wasilla
    Posts
    1,419

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by skydiver View Post
    Same for me. 15-gallon poly and siphon tube.
    This is the best for me also with the Thunderjet. I empty them as soon as I can to keep CG's lower in the waves and stash them on the beach for the return trip home. I write down total fuel used from the Flow Scan totalizer and how much I put in the tanks. Helps keep your fuel managment in order and not wondering how much you actually have left in the tank as the weather picks up!

  11. #11
    Member alaskabliss's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Wasilla
    Posts
    1,419

    Default

    Here is another spin on this. How do you guys transfer fuel from your boat to another if you have in floor tanks? I ran into this problem a few years ago and we had the guy I was helping shut his masters off and pull the fuel sending unit out and use a bulb pump. Took forever but it worked. I have been meaning to buy a auto fuel pump with hoses on each end to transfer fuel from boat to boat if ever needed.

  12. #12
    Member Blue Thunder's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    North of Anchor Pt
    Posts
    682

    Default

    alaskabliss can you tell me about the Flow Scan that you have on your TJ. I have been thinking about putting one on my TJ. What motor do you have, how much trouble was it to install, how accurate is it and how hard was it to calibrate. Thanks and not meaning to steal this thread.
    Retirement Plan - Having Fun and Still Learning

  13. #13
    Member alaskabliss's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Wasilla
    Posts
    1,419

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Blue Thunder View Post
    alaskabliss can you tell me about the Flow Scan that you have on your TJ. I have been thinking about putting one on my TJ. What motor do you have, how much trouble was it to install, how accurate is it and how hard was it to calibrate. Thanks and not meaning to steal this thread.
    I can't remember the model number and the boat is covered but it replaces the tach ad has flow rate and totalizer. I have found it very accurate but I always plan to be back with atleast 1.5 hours of fuel remaining. Calibrating it was easy. Just took a couple short trips to get it dialed in. The install was pretty easy. I had to have a fuel line made up at Jakovich but it was pretty affordable. I highly recommend it and if you want this spring you can come over and look at the install. I am running the Kodiak MPI 350. I cruise at about 3400 rpm and get around 8 gallons an hour, and throttle to the lock and it flows more than I can afford, 20 gph. This tool has allowed me to stay out longer or go farther with knowing what I burn and what I have left. You already know the fuel guage doesn't do much when you get below half!

  14. #14
    Member Blue Thunder's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    North of Anchor Pt
    Posts
    682

    Default

    alaskabliss thanks for the info. Couple more questions. Is your Kodiak, carb or injected? Which fuel line did you need to get made? I have the MP 383 stroker and know I need the Flow Scan the has the 2 sensors, one for the main fuel line and one for the return. Can you PM me with your email as I would very much like to see your set up in the spring. Thanks Dan
    Retirement Plan - Having Fun and Still Learning

  15. #15

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Snowwolfe View Post
    I bought a 12 volt electrical fuel pump rated for gasoline off Ebay a couple of years ago for about $150. Spliced in a long extension cord and added a set of alligator clips. The outlet nozzle is either 7/8 or 1 inch and it will empty a 55 gallon drum in about 6-7 minutes tops. We use it on both the Thunderjet and Sea Sport and never had an issue with it.
    hmmmmm!.......snowwolf, in my case i think this will work quite well!!....i have 2 -80 gallon fish lockers in the floor, one of which i will fill with large, portable gas tanks, then if needed, use the 12 v pump to gas up the main,,,,even have a nice spot for the pump when not in use!!... i too am tired of those 5 gallon tanks!!!..........great thread, thanks guys,,,,will look into Paul h's idea also!!.....larry

    29' Wooldridge Pilot House, Twin 200 Hp Etecs! "...Pez Gordo..."
    18' Wooldridge Sport with 200 hp sport jet. "...Little Pez..."

  16. #16

    Default

    Thanks for the replys fellas....I like the 12v pump idea, but like Pauls method as well. Going to have to mess around a little this winter and figure something out before Spring Fling.

    Though with the new repower on the boat, we may not need to worry about fueling up the Kimber Dawn, and can carry smaller cans for the Wiskey River....

  17. #17
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Tennessee
    Posts
    3,568

    Default

    Running off barrels is a great idea, did it myself on two different Koyukuk trips. Easier if you have outboards as most of the newer efi inboards have a return line going back into the tank. Not a big issue but you need to make sure the main tank can hold the entire barrel you are running off or else it will fill up the tank and pump the excess out of the overflow.

    If you are going on a long river trip the 12 volt pumps are very handy reguardless if you are running off the barrels or refueling using the pump. Reason being you can easily empty the fuel barrels on the boat into empty one's on the beach so you do not have to run with a heavy load once you reach camp. And when you can empty a 55 gallon drum within 5-6 minutes it makes the process pretty painless.

    I also use the same pump in my truck on long trips like to the lower 48 and back. Last two trips down I carried about 75 gallons of diesel in 15 gallon poly barrels in the bed of the truck and could quickly fill up my truck with cheap fuel.

  18. #18
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage and Seward
    Posts
    506

    Default

    I used to carry a couple of 15 gallon polys on longer trips but learned from that experience that one of the first things to look at when buying a boat was fuel capacity (engines and drive come first). Some of the cheaper boats really short you on fuel capacity to lower the price.

  19. #19

    Default

    I added a electric fuel pump from NAPA to my boat works as a transfer pump and spare if engines fuel pump goes out, rigged the whole system up with a Honda fuel line fittings so I can use main tank, spare tank or Honda tank and transfer between them all or use one.
    Be a shame to have a problem and not beable to use a tank because of fitting problem or not pump.

  20. #20
    Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Bush, AK
    Posts
    164

    Default

    Is anyone using the 15 gallon drums from the car wash off craigslist? I just got 2 and one had some nasty pink wax left in it. I thinks its clean now but Im not sure I trust that all the wax is out. This is for hauling av gas in my plane not for my boat.
    I do have 2 others that I use in the boat. Shaker siphon tube is what I use for those.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •