Results 1 to 10 of 10

Thread: fire brick

  1. #1
    Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Interior AK
    Posts
    49

    Default fire brick

    I am building a wood stove do I need to line it wih fire brick. I am not sure if that works all that great anyway.
    Opinions please

  2. #2
    Supporting Member iofthetaiga's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Tanana Valley AK
    Posts
    7,217

    Default

    Depends on your design, thickness of your steel, and how long you want the stove to last. Fire brick insulates and protects the steel from the hottest part of the fire, preventing the steel from burning through.
    ...he who knows nothing is nearer to truth than he whose mind is filled with falsehoods & errors. ~Thomas Jefferson
    I would rather have a mind opened by wonder than one closed by belief. ~Gerry Spence
    The last thing Alaska needs is another bigot. ~member Catch It
    #Resist

  3. #3

    Default

    What kind of wood stove are you building? Why wouldn't you want to line it?
    Fire brick protects your stove, makes it last longer, and adds thermal mass.
    Why are you "not sure if that works all that great"? What are your doubts?
    Inspiration is simply the momentary cessation of stupidity.

  4. #4
    Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    fishhook, ak
    Posts
    1,124

    Default

    and the ceramics radiate a bunch of heat back to the burning wood, resulting in a hotter, cleaner burn.

    and it's insulating properties are especially helpful on the inside of the door to reduce/eliminate warping.

  5. #5
    New member
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Lackawanna, New York
    Posts
    3

    Default

    375, They have been in a stove i made 25+ years. It saves the metal on the stove and the bricks hold a little heat after the fire goes out.

  6. #6
    Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Interior AK
    Posts
    49

    Default

    I removed the bricks in my BK classic on the sides and back, years ago and I have had no warping. I did this to put more wood in the stove for a longer burn time. The stove I am building is kind of like a barrel stove but I am using a barrel that looks like a whiskey keg. It is about 24 inches across and 45 inches long and about 1/8 inch thick. I know people that use barrel stoves made from mil spec type barrels and they have lasted more than 10 years. I guess more room in the stove is more room for wood.

    Thanks for your comments

  7. #7
    Member pacific-23's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Sitka, Ak
    Posts
    306

    Default

    I guess if you have an unlimited "more wood" then you don't need the added efficiency right?

  8. #8
    Member pacific23's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Whitesboro, Texas
    Posts
    534

    Default

    I know of people that don use bricks but they build big enough stoves to hold plenty of wood and they never clean all the ash out , the ash insulates the bottom of the stove so it doesn't burn out and of course the stoves are built out of 1/4" or thicker plate.

  9. #9
    Member JOAT's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Soldotna, ALASKA since '78
    Posts
    3,720

    Default

    Fire brick is good. Don't burn without it.
    Winter is Coming...

    Go GeocacheAlaska!

  10. #10
    Sponsor ADfields's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Missing Palmer AK in Phonix AZ.
    Posts
    6,416

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by pacific23 View Post
    I know of people that don use bricks but they build big enough stoves to hold plenty of wood and they never clean all the ash out , the ash insulates the bottom of the stove so it doesn't burn out and of course the stoves are built out of 1/4" or thicker plate.
    Mine is a 24” pipe ½” wall 30” deep with Ό” ends. I put 2” of sand in the bottom of it level with the inlet that comes in low and in front like a blow torch. There are NO fire brick in there, it’s air tight and I can kill a roaring fire dead, or burn it so hot the whole thing glows red, or anything in between. My efficiency comes from good air control, most of the time you can touch the flu pipe because the heat is not being wasted up the stack like the brick lined ones. Built this in 1981 for my cabin in Prescott Arizona and used it hard ever since, sole heat source there for 19 years then primary source here since 2000 with zero sign of burn through yet . . . more then one way to skin a cat.
    Andy
    On the web= C-lazy-F.co
    Email= Andy@C-lazy-F.co
    Call/Text 602-315-2406
    Phoenix Arizona

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •