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Thread: Calling Success Rates

  1. #1

    Default Calling Success Rates

    Anybody want to share how many stands on average it takes you to call in a critter?
    "Everything that lives and moves will be food for you. Just as I gave you the green plants, I now give you everything."

  2. #2

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    I've never sat down and calculated, but I'd venture a safe bet would be 1 critter called in for every 20 stands. That doesn't mean that every critter gets shot at or killed, just seen. I'd guess that this number will vary greatly across the state. It sounds like guys out on the western part of the state have lots of reds and see quite a few of them.

  3. #3

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    That's encouraging. I've made about 8-10 without anything but Raven's and Magpies. Going out again tomorrow to try. I give each stand about 45 minutes. I think I read that you only do about 15 minutes per stand? Last year I called in a coyote after about 30 minutes on the stand, so I feel I need to stay longer.
    "Everything that lives and moves will be food for you. Just as I gave you the green plants, I now give you everything."

  4. #4
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    depends on a lot of things.Population of critters-weather-the right setup-(particulary for coyotes)1in every 10 good stands is a good guess-I,m here in Penna. and grey fox hunting was great until distemper hit em a few years back-when populations were high we could hammer em-best long night(dark to daybreak) called in 14 and got 9--3 at one stand-all grey fox.I,ve only called in and taken a few coyotes and each one took 30 -45 minutes.They don,t seem to be in a hurry.Good luck

  5. #5
    Member MNViking's Avatar
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    I called in a coyote today and he was there in about 10 mins. I went ahead and screwed up the shot so there is now a very smart yote on the Kenai peninsula.

    When I hunted up north we called in a lynx about every 4 sets, today was the first time I called something in within a hundred or so miles of Anchorage. There are a lot of variables.
    Finally, Brad Childress is GONE!

  6. #6

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    I'm a 15 minute stand person and then I pack and get moving to the next stand. If I get into a heavy lynx area like I did earlier this season, I was about 1 lynx per 5 stands with a double on one stand, which was a first for me.

  7. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by snowcamoman View Post
    I'm a 15 minute stand person and then I pack and get moving to the next stand. If I get into a heavy lynx area like I did earlier this season, I was about 1 lynx per 5 stands with a double on one stand, which was a first for me.
    What area of the state are you in? I'm taking the boys out to play tomorrow on the Kenai.

    "Everything that lives and moves will be food for you. Just as I gave you the green plants, I now give you everything."

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    This season it's somewhere around 90% or so...maybe better? Honestly I can't remember the last set I called without getting a fox in.

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    Member Smokey's Avatar
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    Glad to see this thread, I bought a FoxPro Spitfire a cpl weeks ago and so far made 3 sets - ea at least an hour. Second set I got 2 coyotes to call back, I gave it about 30 min and walked back to truck - when I got there I heard them barking from where I had been set up! Fun to do but a bit frustrating as well.
    When asked what state I live in I say "The State of Confusion", better known as IL....

  10. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by Orelk6x6 View Post
    This season it's somewhere around 90% or so...maybe better? Honestly I can't remember the last set I called without getting a fox in.

    Must be nice. There are little to no fox in my area. Lynx, coyotes, and wolves.
    "Everything that lives and moves will be food for you. Just as I gave you the green plants, I now give you everything."

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    Where are you guys at? I'm in the planning a move to elsewhere in the state, and unfortunately according to my wife, it's going to have to be on the road system somewhere. Likely on the Kenai Peninsula. Can I expect multiple calling sets with nothing to show for it over there? Are the numbers of predators that low, or is the hunting pressure THAT high? I think the predator hunting will be one of the things I miss the most about it out here.

  12. #12
    Member MNViking's Avatar
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    Yes you can expect multiple weekends of calling with nothing to show for it if you hit a bad streak.

    First let me say I'm not a biologist, but my impression of Alaska is as follows. The land has a low carrying capacity for animals. There just isn't that much to eat outside spruce needles, berries in season, and willow buds/bark for the birds and hares. Due to this, there is a relatively low predator population. That, along with the fact that road system area's are heavily trapped makes for some slow predator hunting.
    Finally, Brad Childress is GONE!

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    Quote Originally Posted by MNViking View Post
    First let me say I'm not a biologist, but my impression of Alaska is as follows. The land has a low carrying capacity for animals. There just isn't that much to eat outside spruce needles, berries in season, and willow buds/bark for the birds and hares. Due to this, there is a relatively low predator population. That, along with the fact that road system area's are heavily trapped makes for some slow predator hunting.
    Crazy. I've had virtually the exact opposite experience.

  14. #14

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    So, what part of southwest alaska are you calling in? There are generally pretty educated critters along the road system, at least in south central. I've had many calling experience with little animal activity.

    What setups are you using in southwest ak that work so well? E-caller? Decoy? Ect?

  15. #15

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    I think the predator numbers has a lot to do with food sources available and amount of pressure from trapping/hunting put on the animals. If you live in a fairly remote area with lots of food for predators, then they are likely to be found in and around those areas. If you live in the interior where there are lots of areas like black spruce forests with minimal amount of food (snowshoes, voles...etc), then the predators simply will not be there. They might travel through those areas, but chances are they're not going to be in sufficient numbers to consistently call them. River bottoms and willow thickets with varying spruce and openings will give predators what they need to live, roam and eat. Of course you have wolverine and wolves which run larger areas in search of bigger game or higher elevations, but they still are less likely to be living in "dead" zones as I like to call them. I think the predator density is fairly low for the most part of the state. Combine that with difficult access due to lack of roads and minimal trails and it's just tough to get to easily callable critters that aren't being trapped or already called to. Those are just my quick thoughts on many of the areas that I call and what I've seen. Areas I used to call, I drive past and won't waste my time with simply because I know that chances are slim that I'll call anything.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Orelk6x6 View Post
    Crazy. I've had virtually the exact opposite experience.
    Well I imagine there is a lot less pressure in SW compared to SC.

    When it comes to carrying capacity, AK just doesn't hold a lot of animals compared to the L48. Just briefly, F&G says there are about 950K caribou, and 200K moose living on 375M acres of land which is one large game animal every 326 acres. In the lower 48 people start complaining when whitetail populations fall under 4 or 5 deer PER ACRE. Most of SC is one of the dead zones that snowcamoman talks about.
    Finally, Brad Childress is GONE!

  17. #17

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    I keep getting coytes to respond to howling but won't come out in the open. Even tried a decoy with scent at night. They'll circle around in the trees and howl up a storm. I guess I'm gonna set up IN the trees next time and set the FoxPro out in the open like usual. This is on the Kenai.
    "Everything that lives and moves will be food for you. Just as I gave you the green plants, I now give you everything."

  18. #18
    Member MNViking's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MNViking View Post
    Well I imagine there is a lot less pressure in SW compared to SC.

    When it comes to carrying capacity, AK just doesn't hold a lot of animals compared to the L48. Just briefly, F&G says there are about 950K caribou, and 200K moose living on 375M acres of land which is one large game animal every 326 acres. In the lower 48 people start complaining when whitetail populations fall under 4 or 5 deer PER ACRE. Most of SC is one of the dead zones that snowcamoman talks about.
    let me correct one stat here, the 4 or 5 deer per acre refers to acre in WI of "deer range" which excludes water and urban areas.
    Finally, Brad Childress is GONE!

  19. #19
    Member MNViking's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by blackfoot View Post
    I keep getting coytes to respond to howling but won't come out in the open. Even tried a decoy with scent at night. They'll circle around in the trees and howl up a storm. I guess I'm gonna set up IN the trees next time and set the FoxPro out in the open like usual. This is on the Kenai.
    That sounds like a good plan. Every predator I've shot in AK has been with a shotgun at close range in close cover.
    Finally, Brad Childress is GONE!

  20. #20

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    Are u using coyote sounds or just distress call maybe a challenge howl will help

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