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Thread: Shallow Or Deep, What Do You Prefer?

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    Member 700sps's Avatar
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    Default Shallow Or Deep, What Do You Prefer?

    The title says it all really,I'm just trying to get some tips on where i should fish.

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    Premium Member kasilofchrisn's Avatar
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    What are you fishing for ?
    Rainbows and Kokanees = less than 15 foot of water. Have tried 20'+ and never had any luck in the deeper stuff. My fishing buddies have also tried deeper spots with very little success.
    I have had good luck with Pike at these shallow depths as well.
    "The closer I get to nature the farther I am from idiots"

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    Well, shallow or deep is a good question. Shallow or deep could also be considered a relative term. When you say shallow, how shallow are you talking, and what species are you targeting?

    To answer this question, you need to have a basic understanding of lake ecology. A lake in the winter time is similar to a lake in the summer only in reverse. The lake temperature is stratified, meaning that it has specific zones that are each characterized by different temperatures, different oxygen and carbon dioxide levels, and different vegetation and food types available.

    The upper layer of most lakes (0-20 ft approx.) has the most sunlight (which equates to more photosynthesis occurring with plants) and therefore usually has more oxygen. The upper layer in the winter is colder (about 1 Celsius) than the bottom (4 Celsius). This also means more oxygen because colder water means more oxygen than warm water. Since the upper layer usually has more oxygen, it is generally more productive and has more plant life and food in the form of baitfish, worms, and insects. So for most species of fish (rainbows, landlocked salmon etc.), you should concentrate your efforts closer to the shoreline. However, some species are better suited to live in oxygen poor areas like Lake Trout and Arctic Char. These species are found in water a little deeper (say 20-40+ ft).

    The bottom of a lake is generally pretty stagnant in the summer and winter because there is almost no sunlight, very little oxygen, high carbon dioxide, and low pH levels (acidic) from the dissolved carbon dioxide forming carbonic acid.

    In the spring and fall, because both the bottom and top of a lake is equal in temperature (about 4 Celsius), the lake mixes from the action of wind turning the water over, hence the name spring and fall turnover. This rejuvenates the water and adds oxygen to the lake and releases carbon dioxide. This is why spring and fall are both very productive times to fish a lake.

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    Member 700sps's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by kasilofchrisn View Post
    What are you fishing for ?
    Rainbows and Kokanees = less than 15 foot of water. Have tried 20'+ and never had any luck in the deeper stuff. My fishing buddies have also tried deeper spots with very little success.
    I have had good luck with Pike at these shallow depths as well.
    well the lake that i usually fish on is stocked with rainbows,char,and chinook.there are pike in therr,but not very many.

  5. #5
    Member 700sps's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bushwhack Jack View Post
    Well, shallow or deep is a good question. Shallow or deep could also be considered a relative term. When you say shallow, how shallow are you talking, and what species are you targeting?

    To answer this question, you need to have a basic understanding of lake ecology. A lake in the winter time is similar to a lake in the summer only in reverse. The lake temperature is stratified, meaning that it has specific zones that are each characterized by different temperatures, different oxygen and carbon dioxide levels, and different vegetation and food types available.

    The upper layer of most lakes (0-20 ft approx.) has the most sunlight (which equates to more photosynthesis occurring with plants) and therefore usually has more oxygen. The upper layer in the winter is colder (about 1 Celsius) than the bottom (4 Celsius). This also means more oxygen because colder water means more oxygen than warm water. Since the upper layer usually has more oxygen, it is generally more productive and has more plant life and food in the form of baitfish, worms, and insects. So for most species of fish (rainbows, landlocked salmon etc.), you should concentrate your efforts closer to the shoreline. However, some species are better suited to live in oxygen poor areas like Lake Trout and Arctic Char. These species are found in water a little deeper (say 20-40+ ft).

    The bottom of a lake is generally pretty stagnant in the summer and winter because there is almost no sunlight, very little oxygen, high carbon dioxide, and low pH levels (acidic) from the dissolved carbon dioxide forming carbonic acid.

    In the spring and fall, because both the bottom and top of a lake is equal in temperature (about 4 Celsius), the lake mixes from the action of wind turning the water over, hence the name spring and fall turnover. This rejuvenates the water and adds oxygen to the lake and releases carbon dioxide. This is why spring and fall are both very productive times to fish a lake.
    wow that is an extremely "hi-tech" answer.the lake that i fish at is no deeper than 30 ft,but the majority of it is in the 15-20 ft range.i have fished as shallow as 7 ft , but almost all of my bites this year are within 3-5 ft. from the ice.do you think it would be best to fish shallow?

  6. #6
    Member AKnook's Avatar
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    I like to fish in shallow water. 5-8ft of water usually. I have also had the best luck at these depths for both rainbows and char. The biggest char I have caught was caught in about 4 feet of water. And for large rainbows, I have caught them in about 8 feet of water. Not only has it been very productive fishing the shallows you can also see bottom sometimes. You can see the fish smash bait or your jig which is always exciting.

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