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Thread: Youth Muzzleloader - Advice

  1. #1
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    Default Youth Muzzleloader - Advice

    My eldest boy (10) is now saving for a muzzleloader. He is an accomplished shot and hunter and normally hunts with a hot loaded 357 Marlin 1894 or 870 20Ga. The new extended youth ML season (Kodiak Road System) has got him very interested, especially seeing the vast amount of deer over the last month or so on the roads.
    I have never used a ML, have plenty of friends who can help out though.
    I would just like any advice for a youth gun. I have been looking at the Traditions youth models, their special offers on their website often have them for around $200. Any thoughts?

    http://www.traditionsfirearms.com/pr...04ded1b7b6b563

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    Dad got me and my brother a conneticut arms 45 caliber muzzleloader, its a 209 primer deal which I don't much care for except that its pretty stinking accurate. don't know how much it was but I think it was somewhere around 200 and its a good gun.
    Eccleasties 8:11 Because the sentence against an evil deed is not executed quickly, There for the hearts of the sons of men among them are given fully to do evil.

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    he got it for me when I was 6 and it was a little big but it works well now, I'd look into knight rifles.
    Eccleasties 8:11 Because the sentence against an evil deed is not executed quickly, There for the hearts of the sons of men among them are given fully to do evil.

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    I dunno much about what's out there, so can't recommend anything.

    Other, than to go with a Traditional ML, and learn some HISTORY.

    Rather, than just how to take advantage of a Special Season. There's nuthin interesting, or special about a Single Shot rifle.

    If someone offered me an In-line, I wouldn't take it.

    Smitty of the North
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    Has it ever occurred to you, that Nothing ever occurs to God? Adrien Rodgers.
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  5. #5

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    Look at the TC Impact. It is lightweight, has a removeable one inch spacer in the stock and best of all is made in the USA. Cost about $250.

  6. #6

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    In the interest of getting him hunting, an inline is probably fine. But I kinda agree with Smitty. It would be really nice to get him into something more historical.

    Speaking from the practical standpoint, I've got a rack full of muzzleloaders including some inlines. My granddaughter has free run of the lot, and her hands-down favorite is my 50 cal Pedersoli Frontier Carbine. It LOOKS COOL to her, yet is light and handy even for a small person. It's as accurate as a snakebite with a wide range of charges, so she loads it way down for her own plinking, yet I can load some pretty snorty loads for deer for similar accuracy. At 6 pounds it's plenty light for a small person, too. I didn't dig deeper at the Traditions site to see how much that one weighs, but I'm betting that any of the inlines including youth models are lots heavier.

    They Frontier Carbine is not cheap new, but I picked mine up used in perfect shape for three bills. You can probably find other conventional guns like the CVA Bobcat on the used sites for a bill or so, but it's going to take some searching.

  7. #7

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    Thompson Center Impact is 6.5 lbs. Just got my wife (5' 2") one.

  8. #8

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    That's good to know. With the shorter barrel, it's likely to be easy for a small person to hold and shoot, compared to a longer barrel with the butt simply sawed off.

  9. #9
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    Thanks guys. I assumed that a TC would be out of his price range, but the Impact at around $250 looks very interesting. Although I see the points about traditional vs in-line, the main reason is to take advantage of the season and get him and I into ML, once we have that then maybe follow a bit more on the traditional side.

  10. #10

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    Whichever your son selects, He's going to be happiest for practice and head-shooting snowshoe hares at least, shooting patched round balls with loose powder. Doing so is cheap, and with the right load combo, accurate as a snake bite up through charges of 60 grains at least. Those will delight him while being cheap to shoot and easier on the shoulder. Sabots and pellets will be pretty limiting though, as well as expensive. They're certainly worthy for deer, but will cost so much that he'll be reluctant to shoot as much as he should for practice.

    I think I've pieced together who you are. If I'm right we gillnetted together one day on the boat with Jesse.

    Drop me a PM, and we can talk about getting together for startup help for both of you with the new gun. I have molds and everything for casting round balls and all-lead conicals that don't require sabots, so with the addition of free or cheap lead he can shoot for very little money. The 30 grain charges I use for snowshoe hare translates into 230 shots from a can of powder, so he can do lots of shooting before taking it on a hunt.

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    Don't forget to enroll in the ADFG Muzzleloader Education course. This course is mandatory if you want to hunt MZ specific hunts in Alaska like the kodiak road system hunt you mentioned. Also since you both are new to the sport, this course is an excellent way to gain knowledge and information on how to be safe and successful while hunting with your Muzzleloader.

    The new 2012 ADFG Muzzleloader schedule is out on the web at: huntereducation.alaska.gov

  12. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by Capt. K View Post
    ...this course is an excellent way to gain knowledge and information on how to be safe and successful while hunting with your Muzzleloader.
    And how! I'd recommend it for anyone with a muzzleloader, whether or not they plan to use it in the special hunts. Good stuff, and well presented.

  13. #13
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    I have been looking to buy a starter gun (black powder ) for a 11 yr old neighbor kid that cannot afford one and a cpl more I have looked at are:
    CVA Wolf Compact 22"BBL retails $213.00
    Traditions BuckStalker Youth retails at $199.00
    I have not handled these yet but they are in the size and price range. This youth is pretty small framed...
    The TC Impact is also on my look at list...
    When asked what state I live in I say "The State of Confusion", better known as IL....

  14. #14

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    Inline or traditional, I'd sure start youngsters (and adults for that matter) with about 30 grains of loose 3f powder, round balls and lubed patches. They're really cheap to shoot and accurate as can be even from inlines. Doesn't matter whether it's real black, Pyrodex P or Triple Seven 3f. That load is virtually recoiless, yet gives a good bang and smoke. In every gun I've ever shot it's accurate as a snakebite and perfect for busting snowshoe rabbit heads out to around 50 yards. Using 30 grain charges translates into around 230 shots from a single can of powder.

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