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Thread: possibly someone may know how to accurately acomplish this task in shooters forum

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    Default possibly someone may know how to accurately acomplish this task in shooters forum

    Is there anyone in this shooters forum that has acurately lapped the receiver and bolt lugs on Winchester model 70 ?
    Would be greatfull if you could explain the procedure and how it is acomplished.
    Asked this same question in gunsmiths section. Only received several replies that yes it was possible, with no clear explanation on how it was done.
    Was sure someone must have mastered this technique while working on their model 70.
    Greatful for your help.

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    Supporting Member Amigo Will's Avatar
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    You use a fine lapping compound and work the bolt open and close. Big problem is if you do to much you can't put it back. Try lamp blacking your locking lugs and see what is hitting,machinest blue also works.Then stone the area with a very fine stone and try again.If you get to were all the color comes off you went to far.
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    Member AKDoug's Avatar
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    Will has hit it on the head. I will add that I've lapped a push feed model 70 and a Rem 700 and saw zero improvement in accuracy.

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    Moderator stid2677's Avatar
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    I agree with Doug. If you are having accuracy issues there are many other things that have far more effect on accuracy than lug contact.

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    Member gunbugs's Avatar
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    If you want to do a correct job, you should remove the barrel and use a fixture to put pressure rearward on the bolt body. Also, that way you can see how much engagement you have acheived at the receiver, not just the bolt lugs. A set of headspace gauges will be handy so you can keep track of how much material has been removed. Also, with the barrel off, you can completely clean the lapping compound from the recesses in the receiver. Once the bolt is disassembled and the barrel is off the reciever, then successively finer grits of lapping compound are used while lifting and lowering the bolt handle with the bolt in the receiver, but without engaging the cam surfaces that extract the cartridge. This may take 30 minutes, or it may take hours, depending on the original condition of the surfaces, and the amount of contact desired. It is possible to lap the lugs and receiver far enough to create excess headspace, requiring the barrel to be set back a turn and rechambered. I've also seen receivers and bolts ruined by overzealous lapping and polishing to the point the cam surfaces were damaged beyond seviceability. Generally, I don't recommend lapping lugs on average hunting rifles as the results are not noticeable on paper. If you are building a benchrest rifle, then by all means make this part of the build. If you are installing a new barrel, then lapping the lugs can be part of the job, as you will be setting headspace on the new barrel anyway. Stoning the surfaces by hand outside of the receiver is not recommended, as it is not conducive to precisely mated surfaces, and it is difficult to control the amount of material removed equally between the lugs, plus it does not polish the receiver surfaces.
    "A strong body makes the mind strong. As to the species of exercises, I advise the gun. While this gives moderate exercise to the body, it gives boldness, enterprise, and independence to the mind."

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    Quote Originally Posted by AKDoug View Post
    Will has hit it on the head. I will add that I've lapped a push feed model 70 and a Rem 700 and saw zero improvement in accuracy.
    In a stock rifle with a sloppy chamber I doubt that you would have.
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    Thank you all for your help.
    Don't believe that it would make a big difference in accuracy as much as it would make a smoother action.
    Im trying to squeeze every improvement i can out of all of my model 70's. I have a model 70 super express that will shoot flys.
    The receiver and bolt lugs in it have better than 85% contact, and action is as smoothe as silk.
    So i figured that if i did the same thing with the rest of my 70's they would shoot the same.
    Perhaps they are meant to be the way they are. I just wish that Winchester had fitted all bolts to one standard.
    But seems sometime they take an action and try a bolt till one fits good enough, and then pack it in a box for sales.

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    Gunbugs has given you the correct information about how to do it. What does the rear of the locking lugs currently show for contact? I have seen rifles where only one of the two lugs were making contact; that is a very bad situation. When rebarreling a rifle, I always go for 85+% contact. It will also help your brass last longer. We can only guess how much of an improvement lapping the lugs will make with your rifle. It is very easy to do but you will need to pull the barrel using a barrel vise and use a jig. Good luck. J.

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    Gunbugs
    Could you tell me what prices would be for removing rifle barrel and then putting barel back on when i have lugs touched up.
    Or better yet what price would be for removing barrel and polishing lugs for smoother and better contact.
    Thanks for your help..
    Furbearer

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    Member gunbugs's Avatar
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    Pm me through the forum or give me a call at 687-8500. I try not to use the forum for advertising. Thanks!
    "A strong body makes the mind strong. As to the species of exercises, I advise the gun. While this gives moderate exercise to the body, it gives boldness, enterprise, and independence to the mind."

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    Member 1Cor15:19's Avatar
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    Not an advertisement, but from personal experience I can attest that gunbugs work is excellent and his communication is absolutely top notch.

    BTW Doug, my STW is in the mail.
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    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
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    If you want to smooth out an action, then having the bolt rails and raceway polished is really what you are after.
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