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Thread: Hornady now offers 358 Winchester Brass

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    Member mainer_in_ak's Avatar
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    Default Hornady now offers 358 Winchester Brass

    On top of the new ballistic tip boat tail 358 bullets I posted about a few days ago, it appears we have some new brass too. Never had an issue with Winchester brass, but I do like seeing more available components for one of my all time favorite cartridges. Although it really doesn't matter because you could have any brass you want by running ANY 308 Winchester brass through the 358 sizer die.......but some folks like to see that "358 WIN" headstamp.

    http://www.hornady.com/store/358-WIN-Unprimed-Cases/

    There is now three types of 358 Brass:

    http://www.grafs.com/retail/catalog/...ategoryId/822?

  2. #2

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    Good news, and thanks for posting. Yeah, it's easy to make, but there's some value in avoiding the case prep involved. Speaking as a 40-year fan of the 358 Winnie, it's good to develop the habit of buying and hording components as you find them. Sooner or later they dry up, and it takes around 10 years for another "revival" of the caliber by the magazine pimps.

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    You guys have me thinking again. I have a Rem 660 in 243 and I was almost to the point of making a decision to have it rebarreled to .338 Fed...now I'm back to the .358 Win as a possibility. The short barrel in .338 Fed may not give it any advantage over the .358 win and either will shoot far enough for most anything under 250 yds. I guess it is a coin flip.
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    If I can weigh in, I've never liked the spectrum of 338 bullets suitable for mid-size and small cases. You have to pick and choose carefully because most are intended for the higher vel of a 338wm. On the other hand, I'm yet to find a single 358 bullet that I felt was too tough for the 358 winnie. YMMV, of course.

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    You are right Brownbear. I was actually thinking of using a Barnes 185 gr TSX in the .338 Fed and I think they are supposed to expand down to 1800 which will allow them to work pretty well. But, I'm not really sure you gain anything over the .358 with a 200 gr TSX except a little slicker bullet but again under 250 yrds there isn't much difference on elk or moose and they won't know which hit them.

    Any experience with the Barnes TSX in .338 or ,358 out there??
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    Member mainer_in_ak's Avatar
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    I once tried the 220 grain triple shock as a handload. I couldn't even fit a starting load (as per the barnes manual) of IMR 4895 because the bullets were so darn long. I called them on the phone and they told me to use a "spiral drop funnel" to fit more powder, and I told them about not even being able to fit the starting load. The cartridges would grow in length every time I cycled them through my BLR because the powder was so heavily compressed. I had even used a lee factory crimp die, but the bands in the bullet took away surface area that keeps good neck tension. Anything above a 200 grain x type bullet, I don't think they belong in a 358 Winchester.

    One of the best bullets for the 358 velocity is the 250 grain Speer Hot Cor. There isn't a bear on the face of this planet that I wouldn't aim that bullet at. The very dense Alliant MR 2000 powder is the next powder I will try with the Speer Hot Cor. It has a burn characteristic/rate as Reloader 15 but is ball type power instead of stick/extruded.....so you can fit a lot more with less pressure. Even with a very long 200 grain nosler partition in the 308 winchester, I was able to fit an astonishing 47 grains of powder! I have yet to shoot this load over a chronograph. No pressure signs either, and I used up all the case capacity.....it might even be slightly compressed. I had sticky extraction with federal blue box.....but certainly not with my max handloads. The primers didn't flatten until around 45.5 grains of powder.

  7. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by mainer_in_ak View Post
    One of the best bullets for the 358 velocity is the 250 grain Speer Hot Cor. There isn't a bear on the face of this planet that I wouldn't aim that bullet at.
    Amen to that. I'm yet to recover one from any species of game. Popped a moose at 75 yards in the left shoulder, angled toward me. Exited through the front of the right ham after going more or less full length, leaving a golf ball exit hole. Probably the closest I'll ever come to recovering one.

    Keep us posted on that MR 2000. I've had my radar tuned for a better powder for the 250, and sounds like you're nipping at its heels.

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    Member GD Yankee's Avatar
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    Woo hoo! Thanks for the intel!

    Dave

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    Member Float Pilot's Avatar
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    I would love to have a short action light-weight, controlled feed, stainless in 358 Win.
    Maybe a rebarreled Kimber Montana. If I could get one that works.
    Floatplane,Tailwheel and Firearms Instructor- Dragonfly Aero
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    Member mainer_in_ak's Avatar
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    Yes pilot,

    I have plans on a lightweight 358 too. I will be doing a sheep hunt with it. 200 grain accubond or 200 grain tipped triple shock, drop the scope and 270 grain round nose and open sights for the hike out. Using the 358 winchester and the 9.3x62 mauser exclusively almost a decade, I can only conclude that the 358 winchester is like a "lightweight 9.3x62". It has a similar effect on game, only a much lighter package for hiking. I did shoot a box of 310 grain doubletap roundnose (when they were avail.), but the recoil was too much in a 6.5 lb. rifle. I couldn't get on target fast enough. Try pushing a bullet that size out of a 338 Federal!

    6.5lbs is plenty light enough when combined with a lightweight straight tube scope. Some might want lighter, but the recoil is quite bold in a 358. I can't hold a scoped 5.5lb. rifle very well in the offhand postion, too much tremors and not enough forward weight. At 6.5 lbs, it settles much better. The extra pound is worth it.

    Maybe Ak Lance can tell us what it feels like to shoot a 200 grain in his 308 Win Montana........


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    Member Float Pilot's Avatar
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    The 358 Winchester is what the 338 Federal wants to be when it grows up.
    Floatplane,Tailwheel and Firearms Instructor- Dragonfly Aero
    Experimental Hand-Loader, NRA Life Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Float Pilot View Post
    The 358 Winchester is what the 338 Federal wants to be when it grows up.
    Maybe....but my Tikka is a 338 Fed and it likes it that way.....I don't think the critters care.
    Somewhere along the way I have lost the ability to act politically correct. If you should find it, please feel free to keep it.

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