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Thread: Weatherby Rebarrel Question

  1. #1
    Member Whitetail1der's Avatar
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    Default Weatherby Rebarrel Question

    Looking for advice/guidance on getting a weatherby I have rebarrelled. I purchased some years ago a .300 WTBY MAG, MK V Super Big Game Hunter. I've been trying to get it to shoot 180 grn bullets since purchasing it and it's all over the target. Factory and re-loads doesn't matter. I'm convinced it's got to do with the thin barrel so I'd like to get it rebarrelled with a heavier barrel. What are your thoughts on the situation and who in Anchor town or the Kenia Pen. does reputable work?

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    Member Alaskacajun's Avatar
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    I wonder if your stock is too tight/loose or something like that?! If I bought a Weatherby that wouldn't group around MOA I would have brought it back and had them go over it!

    It's a piece of junk, cut your loses and give it to me... I'll dispose of it for you at no charge!

    - Clint

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    Your comment about the barrel weight might be accurate. Weatherby used to freebore their barrels .5" or so to keep from causing excessive pressure. I would bet your barrel is freebored and that is causing the inaccuracy. You should be able to see the free bore between the chamber and the rifling. Is so, you might be able to have a gun smith set the barrel back and re chamber. Or a new barrel. Good luck. J.

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    Member Alaskacajun's Avatar
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    I'm pretty sure all of the Magnum Wty's are "freebore"... I realize with some $300/400 rifle's you need to get the bullet as close to the lands as possible for increased accuracy. But the Wty's are fired at the factory for accuracy/function before they ship out. If it doesn't shoot around MOA they don't ship it, they guarantee their accuracy. They even provide the target with the rifle. So, if I bought one and paid anywhere from $1000 to $2000 and it didn't shoot around MOA I would bring it back to Weatherby and Make Them Fix It...........

    Whitetail1der, how good is your scope mounted, do you have a good quality scope/scope mounts? Have you tried letting someone else shoot the rifle?(My Dad's shoots really good when I shoot it ) I just have a hard time believing that Wty allowed a "Lemon" to leave their factory, but I guess anything's possible! Mine shoots 165 gr's, 180 gr's, and 200 gr's like a dream. I can put 3 - 200 gr's nearly in the same hole. This has been my experience with other Wty's that I've shot....

    - Clint

  5. #5

    Default OK

    Check the crown and see if it is concentric. It may be a crown problem. The scope mounts may be inadaquate for the recoil of this rifle, also try another scope on this rifle. Check the torque on the action screws. If after all options have been exhausted then consider sending it to the factory with a letter expressing your concerns (regardless of age). All else having failed then consider a rebarrel.
    " Americans will never need the 2nd Amendment, until the government tries to take it away."

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    Member whateveri8's Avatar
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    Default Rebarreling a WBY $$$$

    I've been down this road before with the same model and caliber you mention. My research for getting a new barrel and getting the work done was going to exceed the cost of replacing the rifle.

    I choose the sold it and got a new one that works great path. I replaced it with a stainless steel/synthetic stock option for an all weather condition package. Since Weatherby rifles went to Wal-Mart stocked items, they just don't carry the same tradition as the kraut and US made rifles.
    the 300wby cartridge is a great round that pushes a 30 cal bullet FAST and flat.
    300wby is chambered in other great actions like the CZ 550, Remington 700 and ruger M77

    On the other hand,

    I have found that stock rifles are going up in price and quality is not rising at the same speed. It is now actually dollar for dollar better to have a custom built rifle made for you.

    Choose your action, barrel, stock and add the trigger of your choice. Then get a good gunsmith to screw your parts together for the best accuracy by truing your receiver, lapping bolt lugs, and other fitting that factory mass produced rifles often do not have going for them.

    Wild West Guns in Anchorage does good work but he's spendy (and worth it)
    Google search " Weatherby rifle gunsmith " and you will find 'smiths that specialize in wby rifles. After all, If your Mark V is Deutsche or American Southgate WBY it's got value to it.
    Newer Japanese WBY's I would not advise dropping big $$ on re-barreling.

    hope this helps
    God, Guns and Guts is what made America Great

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    If you would like to sell your "broken" wby I would be interested, and I have a very hard time believing your sporter weight barrel is causing poor accuracy. My mark V 270 wby. is 30+ yrs of age and drives tacks with its sporter weight factory barrel-with free bore and all. Try the tips others have given you and then ask weatherby for any hints and then send it in.

    CZ

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    Member Whitetail1der's Avatar
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    Unhappy

    Weatherby's not going to touch this rifle. Why? I bought it through a private FFL Dealer and not from a Weatherby dealer. Since ownership I've altered the stock in attempting to figure this gun out and make it a shooter. I'll explain; I first got the gun and mounted a Leupold LPS Scope with Leupold Double Dove Tail Mounts and Rings. Put factory ammo down range with disappointing results (180 grn, avg 4+" groupings @100yds ). I tried reloading and worked many various brands (Speer/Hornady/Barnes) of bullets (180 grn again and some 200 grns) and powders through it with the same results. Ok I'm frustrated and not sure what to do so I do a little light reading to get more educated on the problem at hand...boy do I learn allot! I lighten the trigger pull (via factory instructions) and the gun goes off much smoother so I've eliminate trigger pull from the equation but my grouping still sucks. I check the action screws and they are factory tight all the way, now that's eliminated too. This gun has the forward stock pressure point built into it, so I remove it knowning I can rebuild it if need be. I go and shoot with a fully floated barrel and the grouping sucks yet again, but not any worse than before. Now I'm really frustrated so I put the gun back in the safe and 8 months later dig it out and decide to bed the action. Well all I really do is bed the recoil lug well, because there's so much slop in the pocket, but I can't bed the rear action tang because of the aluminum bedding in the stock. Ok, so I reassemble the gun (nice bed job by the way!), take it to the range and 180's still group large (2 inches @ 100yds) 50% better than it had been but not good enough. I decide to down grade a bit and shoot 130 grn reloads through it and low and behold, I now am grouping sub-MOA. What the heck is going on? Do I now own a finicky rifle that's only going to shoot light loads?

    To answer the scope question, I've put two Leupolds on the gun with the same results. (one was the LPS and another one was a VX-III) I've used both scopes on some of my other rifles and they are tack drivers so it's not the scope or mounts. I have to wonder if the barrel is so light and whips so violently with resonance that its pointing differently everytime I pull the trigger?

    I also like to think my bench shooting technics are not at fault either. I shoot a .338 Win Mag, 35 Whelen, .300 Win Mag, .30-06 Springfield with great accuracy. BTY, this model gun is identical to the Ultra Lightweight MK-V on Weatherbys website. I got this gun for a goat hunt in 04 because of it's light weight. I also intend to use it for sheep too.

    I'm on the verge of bedding the entire barrel out to the end of the stock to see if that will do anything but man does that seem excessive.

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    Don't be afraid to bed the whole barrel; often times light barrels shoot best with full contact. If it does not shoot then, get a new barrel. Good luck. J.

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    Member Alaskacajun's Avatar
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    Wow, That really sux..........

    - cLINT

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    Quote Originally Posted by whateveri8 View Post
    I've been down this road before with the same model and caliber you mention. My research for getting a new barrel and getting the work done was going to exceed the cost of replacing the rifle.
    Whateveri8:
    I'm curious as to why a Weatherby would be more expensive to rebarrel than any other rifle. I had a barrel replaced, blueprinted, glass bedded, etc., and it didn't exceed the cost of the rifle, which wasn't nearly as expensive as a Weatherby.
    Smitty of the North

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    Is the barrel free floated? If so you might try puting a piece of sand paper about 3/4 the way out the stock, to put pressure on the barrel. Just remember to put the sand paper toward the wood. Put the barreled action back in the stock and torque the screws. Go shoot it. First make sure the sandpaper is putting pressure on the barrel. If not add 2 pieces or enough that it touches the barrel. Then go shoot. If it doesn't help and another piece. This is not a big piece of sand paper 1/2" square will work. If this works then glass bed that spot. This will probably fix the problem. Very cheap fix. Hope this helps.

  13. #13
    Member Whitetail1der's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by barko View Post
    Is the barrel free floated? If so you might try puting a piece of sand paper about 3/4 the way out the stock, to put pressure on the barrel. Just remember to put the sand paper toward the wood. Put the barreled action back in the stock and torque the screws. Go shoot it. First make sure the sandpaper is putting pressure on the barrel. If not add 2 pieces or enough that it touches the barrel. Then go shoot. If it doesn't help and another piece. This is not a big piece of sand paper 1/2" square will work. If this works then glass bed that spot. This will probably fix the problem. Very cheap fix. Hope this helps.
    The gun came with a Bell &Carlson Synthetic stock and originally had the post on the forestock that you are suggesting. I removed it knowing I could rebuild it if need be. I'm going shooting with it this weekend and plan on testing the paper method you've suggested just to see if anything happens. If it works out then problem solved, if not then my next step is a full barrel bed job. If that fails....I'm in the market for a rebutable gunsmith to check tolerances and alignments and possibly (most likely) rebarrel job.

  14. #14
    New member George's Avatar
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    Default the occassional stinker!

    Well, Seems like you've done everything to eliminate a gremlin. Some rifles do like shorter bullets. Why???... twist, bullet barrel time, barrel harmonics, etc. dunno? That caliber should shoot the bullet types it's intended to for sure- something in the 165-190 gr. range. Re-barrel is an option and you may be approaching that. The upside is you can choose a very wide range of cartridges that way. Don't know why a Weatherby re-barrel would cost more??? Some gunsmiths are set up for and more experienced with certain action types. Simple re-barrel shouldn't cost any more though. Now... blueprinting the action- that is a different story, particularly with the Weatherby. Most gunsmiths likely can't do that. But, short of that you should ask how the barrel blank is threaded. If they single-point-cut the threads on a lathe to match the receiver ring threads and maintain perfect alignment between the barrel axis and receiver axis- that will go a long way toward ensuring that gremlin is eliminated. Next question and research to do is the reamer specs for the cartridge you choose. Make sure the OAL for bullet choices will fit into the magazine then ask the gunsmith to set the throat length so the bullet jump isn't excessive AND the throat length isn't so short that a longer bullet wouldl be seated too far into the case body setting up a whole other set of problems. Also, I've learned to have chambers reamed so that, with new brass, the headspace is near zero. That way you're not excessively stretching the cases from the first shot- adds to case life. All reamers are not equal!! They are easy to check with a mic before starting. Worst case would be to buy a reamer to your specs and have the gunsmith use it for your rifle or maybe even cost-share the reamer with the gunsmith and he keeps it (150 +/- or about 75 your cost). Of course before all that, choose a barrel-- maker, bore diameter, twist, contour, type of steel. The better ones will likely run 300-350. Anyway, you may have gone thru all this before- just some things I've learned to ask and watch for in going the re-barrel route.

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