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Thread: Dual Frequency CHIRP Fish Finders

  1. #1
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    Dec 2011
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    Salt Lake City, UT
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    Default Dual Frequency CHIRP Fish Finders

    Hi guys,
    I am looking at purchasing one of the new CHIRP fish finders, specifically the Garmin GSD26 with the 7215 display and a few other bells and whistles. I've read in earlier posts from 270ti and others about how different fish show up differently on the screen. My question is, are the fish different colors, or shapes, or what, and how long does it take to become familiar with what you are seeing? Mostly I'm interested in finding cohos, and if I could learn to see halibut that'd be great too. It's a pretty sizable investment and I don't know exactly what to expect for my cash. 270ti posted some photos back it 2008, but they're gone now. I've seen photos from the dealers and websites, but I just wonder if the equipment will live up to the hype, and how long it will take me to figure out what I'm seeing. Any help would be appreciated...

  2. #2

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    I'll dig up the photos I have.

    I'm probably the biggest fan of knowing what you are seeing on your color sounder. You can size up a drag in a pass or two, and answer the all important question of "do i stay or do i go". I've gotten in areas where I make a few passes and not gotten a bit, but because I've seen fish down there I stuck with it and had it go wide open after the other boats ran away.

    Last season I used a Raymarine, JRC, Furuno, and lowrance. All marked kings/cohos just fine. Gain, water depth, and movement determines what the marks look like. You just got to know what area you are in, and believe the data being given to you. Salmon mark really well in less than 100ft of water. Less than 60, and you can see them all.

    My fiance was calling out bites before they happened this July when I had a hand troll bite (commercial fishing) in less than 70ft of water, and we put 60 kings in the skiff in 4 days. We marked just about every single one of them on my Raymarine. Marked another 200 or so that didn't bite..(grin) Nothing is more frustrating than having kings under the boat and them not biting. Happens alot.

    Here are some pics. That Garmin unit looks great. I don't think anybody is making a bad sounder these days. It's not up to the unit to catch you fish, it's up to the fisherman to interpret the data being shown to him, and to make good decisions to fill up the boat.

    Kings on a obsolete cheapo lowrance..




  3. #3
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    Dec 2011
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    Salt Lake City, UT
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    Thanks 270! That's exactly what I was looking for. It's amazing that in 60 feet of water you can see everything! I can't wait. Usually we fish in 60-100 feet, so I think it's gonna work great. I'm pretty excited. Can't wait 'til summer when I can get up there!

  4. #4

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    Easiest way to know what a rock fish looks like... go park over a rockpile covered in rockfish. It'll remove all doubt..(grin)

    You know salmon, especially cohos, hang mid level. Look your sounder over really well after every salmon bite. It won't take you long to get it figured out. Usually, unless your gain is crazy high, any yellow or red mark mid level will be a salmon. You'll know if it was a rockfish, as they bite anything.

    I depend completely on my sounder when guiding or commercial fishing for success. I never just fish an area and hope for the best, or jump into a group of boats because they are fishing a particular area. (usually out of desperation) That might work a few days, but over a 60+ day season, you have to know what stuff looks like and actually be able to find salmon to limit the boat almost every single day.

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