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Thread: Anchors in Southeast Alaska and Inside Passage

  1. #1

    Default Anchors in Southeast Alaska and Inside Passage

    I would like to do the Inside Passage to Southeast Alaska next year from Washington. I would like some advice on the best type of anchor to use from someone with experience in the area. Currently I use a Danforth in usually sand bottoms but I guess for up North there will be rock and kelp to deal with. I have an 18 foot boat, about 2000 lbs.

  2. #2

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    in an 18' boat??????????????

  3. #3
    Member kodiakrain's Avatar
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    Danforth's work fine, tho I would have to recommend finding a Bruce, or imitation thereof, for all Alaska anchoring bottom terrain

    I would also go one size larger than the book says you need for your boat size

    Absolutely Required, that you have some chain at the bottom of your anchor rode, like 5 fathoms minimum, (that's 30 ft) to keep the shank of the anchor down in any surge
    (maybe 3fa. Would work for your size rigging, but more is always better )

    The Bruce style is pretty darn sticky
    in any bottom you'll find throughout that area

    Sounds like quite an adventure, what kind of boat have you got?

    Have Fun, remember us with some photos and stories of your trip,

    I get to run up this spring also, with a 36fter from Port Townsend, WA to Kodiak, sometime in April, or May
    stay in touch,.......
    Ten Hours in that little raft off the AK peninsula, blowin' NW 60, in November.... "the Power of Life and Death is in the Tongue," and Yes, God is Good !

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    Member NewMoon's Avatar
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    +1

    We've used Bruce anchors, 5kg on our C-Dory 22, and 7.5kg on our 26-footer, for many years of cruising BC and SE Alaska. They work really well on the Inside Passage, except in the rare very soft mud bottom. In a really kelpy spot you may have to reset once or twice.

    We decided last year to go bigger and more advanced with a 10kg Rocna. It works even better.

    You do need at least a boat length of chain. You might bring the Danforth as a spare/backup - we carry a Fortress.
    Richard Cook
    New Moon (Bounty 257)
    "Cruising in a Big Way"

  5. #5

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    Yes, an 18 ft. plywood custom outboard boat, fully enclosed and self sufficient. It is a displacement hull not planning. I won't be able to ignore the current and rips in narrow spots but has excellent range, and handles rough water just fine. I expect to be the smallest boat at any dock or anchorage I stop at except for the many sea kayaks that make the same trip every year.

  6. #6

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    SEA KAYAKS????????????????there are guys that paddle a kayak from Seattle to Alaska?How far up into Alaska?

    Quote Originally Posted by piccup View Post
    Yes, an 18 ft. plywood custom outboard boat, fully enclosed and self sufficient. It is a displacement hull not planning. I won't be able to ignore the current and rips in narrow spots but has excellent range, and handles rough water just fine. I expect to be the smallest boat at any dock or anchorage I stop at except for the many sea kayaks that make the same trip every year.

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    Member AlaskaHippie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by elim View Post
    SEA KAYAKS????????????????there are guys that paddle a kayak from Seattle to Alaska?How far up into Alaska?
    There used to be guys who kayaked from Alaska to the West Coast of the U.S. on a fairly regular basis. They were called Aleuts. There were also folks who paddled from Hawaii to Tahiti, they were called Polynesians...

    In these times it is done quite often as well. I've known friends who have sea kayaked from Seward to San Francisco, Homer to Seattle, etc.

    Before the days of Loran/GPS/Autopilot/Engines/Anchor Winches/etc. there was this thing known as seamanship......
    “Life has become immeasurably better since I have been forced to stop taking it seriously.” ― H.S.T.
    "Character is how you treat those who can do nothing for you."

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    Member kodiakrain's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AlaskaHippie View Post
    There used to be guys who kayaked from Alaska to the West Coast of the U.S. on a fairly regular basis. They were called Aleuts. There were also folks who paddled from Hawaii to Tahiti, they were called Polynesians...

    In these times it is done quite often as well. I've known friends who have sea kayaked from Seward to San Francisco, Homer to Seattle, etc.

    Before the days of Loran/GPS/Autopilot/Engines/Anchor Winches/etc. there was this thing known as seamanship......
    This is True,

    piccup, you might be surprised to find folks cruising the Inside passage in all kinds of skiffs,(referring to anything uder 22ft)


    I've heard of guys cruising up in Boston Whalers, and such,quite often, similar to the size rig you are going to take up,
    I actually believe they "Get to" blow on by most of the current and tide rip areas with impunity,

    You are not stretching it, and it sounds like you are well prepared with some experience and knowledge of what you are operating


    just curious, what size/weight Danforth have you been using, and what is the recommended size anchor for your boat?

    I'm a bit envious, have always thought a small boat run through SE would be really a great trip
    Ten Hours in that little raft off the AK peninsula, blowin' NW 60, in November.... "the Power of Life and Death is in the Tongue," and Yes, God is Good !

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    Member NewMoon's Avatar
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    A few years ago we ran into a guy in Glacier Bay who had paddled his kayak SOLO from Seattle, and was just turning around to head back south. Tougher than us!
    Richard Cook
    New Moon (Bounty 257)
    "Cruising in a Big Way"

  10. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by piccup View Post
    Yes, an 18 ft. plywood custom outboard boat, fully enclosed and self sufficient. .

    sounds like a fun trip!!..care to show us a pic or "three" of your boat??....will you be doing some fishing?....we will be around rupert in june, will look for you if you are around!!....larry

    29' Wooldridge Pilot House, Twin 200 Hp Etecs! "...Pez Gordo..."
    18' Wooldridge Sport with 200 hp sport jet. "...Little Pez..."

  11. #11

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    I use a 9 lb standard Danforth anchor on 8 feet of 1/4 inch chain now and it works very well in the typical sand bottoms I see. My boat only draws 18 inches and can dry out on low tides in most areas (no large rocks) so I can pick some very small and snug little spots to anchor in, places that larger boats would pass by. As far as kayaks doing this route, I will be following almost the exact path of Dennis Dwyer who paddled a sea kayak from Puget Sound to Skagway, although I intend to go no further North than Petersburg. Dwyer wrote a book called "Point to Point" and has a good blog called Sea Kayaking the Inside Passage. Most of the info on the Inside Passage I have found has been either written by people in large trawlers or planning hull powerboats, neither of which my 18 ft. skiff is close to in handling. The experiences of Dwyer in his kayak and the information from his book and blog are actually more useful for my trip since he had to be more careful of wind and sea conditions than a larger or faster boat would be.


    Stan

  12. #12

    Default Normally a sailboat. Inside Passage will be as a motor skiff


  13. #13

    Default 1/2 gal hr at hull speed. Range 120 miles on 2 six gal tanks


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    My boat is an 18 ft. Jim Michalak design shallow draft sailboat but I will be operating it with motor only, Honda 8 hp, on the Inside Passage. The photo of a sistership motoring is included to show the boat without sails. There is a slot down the center of the cabin for standing headroom and access fore and aft, the slot is sealed in bad weather.

    Stan

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    Watched this show last night...
    http://www.junkdreams.com/about

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    Member kodiakrain's Avatar
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    What is your hull speed ? and are you going solo?
    Ten Hours in that little raft off the AK peninsula, blowin' NW 60, in November.... "the Power of Life and Death is in the Tongue," and Yes, God is Good !

  17. #17

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    My hull speed is about 6 mph. In the past I got that at half throttle with a Honda 5 hp. I have not tested my new Honda 8hp but I expect 1/3 throttle for that speed. That would be painfully slow for most planning motorboat owners but I am used to sailing so it's normal for me. I normally run 40-50 miles a day but with the increased daylight on the Inside Passage I will probably do 50-60 miles. My plan is to take the entire summer for this trip so there will be no hurry at all, I will wait for slack tides at narrow spots and calm water for long open crossings. The journey itself is the point, not what I do when I get to the destination. My wife will be with me for part of the trip up Southern B.C. coast and my son may crew for part of the Northern B.C. coast. I will solo a large part of the trip.

    Stan

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    Moderator kingfisherktn's Avatar
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    Stan:

    Will you have backup propulsion or will you be able to use sails if you have motor problems?

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    Member AKBassking's Avatar
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    Wow sounds like a great adventure. Start a blog here and keep us posted on your trip.

    ALASKAN SEA-DUCTION
    1988 M/Y Camargue YachtFisher
    MMSI# 338131469
    Blog: http://alaskanseaduction.blogspot.com/

  20. #20

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    Honda has been making that same 8 hp motor for 40 years, I am counting on their having worked the bugs out and it will run 600-1000 hours without failure. The mainmast and saill will be lashed down on the cabin top normally but in an emergency I can rig up and sail. The mizzen sail on the stern will be set and used for roll stabilizer, as well as giving some drive when the wind is right.

    Stan

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