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Thread: Win. Model 70 v Remmy 721/725

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    Member sayak's Avatar
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    Default Win. Model 70 v Remmy 721/725

    I have been a Winchester Model 70 fan since the early 80s when I bought a brand new one as my first "high power" rifle. Last year I sold my old Winnie to my son and have been missing it ever since. Now I have a lead on a classic looking Remington 725 in 30.06. I have only owned Remmy shotguns so don't know much about the rifles. How does the Remington 700 bolt series compare to the Model 70? Will I be disappointed? It hefts and points well.
    Don't want to start a Ford v Chevy, Polaris v Arctic Cat type battle here; just interested in opinions on the 725 specifically. Thanks.

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    Supporting Member iofthetaiga's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sayak View Post
    Don't want to start a Ford v Chevy, Polaris v Arctic Cat type battle here
    Good luck with that.
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    Member The Kid's Avatar
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    725s are cool and fairly scarce rifles, I have only seen a handful in my travels. All but one of which were chambered for the 30-06, with the one exception being a 270.

    The 725 is pretty much just a 721 with the Model 30/ 1917 rocker safety. I really like that safety and wish they hadn't went to the sheet metal one, not that the newer one isn't adequate, just not as nifty and robust.

    Personally, if you are going from a pushfeed M70 to a 725 I don't think you'll notice much if any difference once you get used to it. And the 725 will likely show a higher level of fit and finish, if it's in good shape.

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    Member Float Pilot's Avatar
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    One thing that I really like about the Winchester M-70 is that the safety locks the firing pin in place. So while cycling the bolt with the safety in position #2 the firing pin cannot move. And of course position #3 locks the bolt as well.
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    Member sayak's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by The Kid View Post
    725s are cool and fairly scarce rifles, I have only seen a handful in my travels. All but one of which were chambered for the 30-06, with the one exception being a 270.

    The 725 is pretty much just a 721 with the Model 30/ 1917 rocker safety. I really like that safety and wish they hadn't went to the sheet metal one, not that the newer one isn't adequate, just not as nifty and robust.

    Personally, if you are going from a pushfeed M70 to a 725 I don't think you'll notice much if any difference once you get used to it. And the 725 will likely show a higher level of fit and finish, if it's in good shape.
    Seems to be in excellent shape, with a good bore, nice wood, and fair bluing. It does seem to have been cut down some on the butt, as evidenced by a slight gap between the pad and the wood and a less than professional sanding job on the pad to make it fit. Not sure how much it might have been trimmed for LOP. The party wants $400.

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    Member sayak's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Float Pilot View Post
    One thing that I really like about the Winchester M-70 is that the safety locks the firing pin in place. So while cycling the bolt with the safety in position #2 the firing pin cannot move. And of course position #3 locks the bolt as well.
    My Model 70 had a very stiff safety, so I never enjoyed that feature much for that reason. The safety on this Remmy is very easy to move; much like my Mk 4, but on the opposite side.

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    comparing accuracy between a Remington and a Winchester is one thing ... comparing the engineering is quite another thing completely - if you are intending the rifle for "HUNTING" there IS only one choice and Jack O'conner said it .... and before the "hate mail" starts just let me say that I don't believe I have ever heard of a model 70 trigger freezing up in the nasty weather .... or finding a model 70 bolt open and magazine empty after a "hike" or having a model 70 safety "accidentally" getting pushed to "fire" unknowingly ..... there! I said it ....

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    Member Matt's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by back country View Post
    comparing accuracy between a Remington and a Winchester is one thing ... comparing the engineering is quite another thing completely - if you are intending the rifle for "HUNTING" there IS only one choice and Jack O'conner said it .... and before the "hate mail" starts just let me say that I don't believe I have ever heard of a model 70 trigger freezing up in the nasty weather .... or finding a model 70 bolt open and magazine empty after a "hike" or having a model 70 safety "accidentally" getting pushed to "fire" unknowingly ..... there! I said it ....
    I fell in a creek in November deer hunting and the temp was about 5 degrees out or so. My Model 70 7mm WSM was submerged under the water for a few good seconds before I got out. The trigger didn't freeze but the firing pin spring did. Was crazy weak and barely moved.

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    when you cleaned the bolt body out what came out of it ? I would imagine it was grease or heavy dirty oil which is standard for any new bolt action, first thing to do is get that gunk out of there when you get any new gun - Hard to blame a rifle's design on that one ....

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    besides ..... you're not supposed to "swim" when it's THAT cold !

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    Member sayak's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by back country View Post
    when you cleaned the bolt body out what came out of it ? I would imagine it was grease or heavy dirty oil which is standard for any new bolt action, first thing to do is get that gunk out of there when you get any new gun - Hard to blame a rifle's design on that one ....
    Good point!

    My wife's uncle, a true sourdough by any measurement, taught me long ago: at beginning of cold weather, soak your bolt in kerosene (or at least firing pin on a shotgun), then use gun oil sparingly until spring.

    I wonder how many of us have learned that the hard way: lined up on a beast or bird in below zero weather, pulled the trigger and heard nothing... or had a hang-fire. Frustrating at the least or dangerous at worst.

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    Member Matt's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by back country View Post
    when you cleaned the bolt body out what came out of it ? I would imagine it was grease or heavy dirty oil which is standard for any new bolt action, first thing to do is get that gunk out of there when you get any new gun - Hard to blame a rifle's design on that one ....
    I wouldn't say the rifle was new at all. Granted I only got it in August or so, but have put over 350 rounds down the barrel before that hunt. Stuff will fail regardless of design. And are you referring to the packing grease that is found on new rifles? That was all gone long ago on mine.

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    Member The Kid's Avatar
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    I have a 1980s production push feed M70 that I would happily trade for a nice 725, anytime. As far as the safety function goes, I'm not 100% sure that it doesn't cam the cocking piece off of the sear, that's how the safety works on a M30. I don't know as I haven't had one apart to examine closely. And furthermore, if we go dunking our rifles in the drink or rolling them in the mud, I think it is foolish of us to think," Oh it's a (insert model here) it's sure to work". Because if there's nothing in the trigger, as Matt proved there's likely to be something in the bolt body, or mag box, or barrel, or any number of other cubbyholes.

    If I were in your shoes Sayak, I'd be snatching me up a nice old 725.

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    Go find a used Mod. 70 with the claw extractor and the old Mod. 70 trigger.

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    Member sayak's Avatar
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    I'm afraid a controlled feed M.70 is a bit out of my price range! Anyway, I never had any feeding issues with my push feed M. 70. I am principally interested in the classic-ness of this firearm (made between '58-'61), though I really don't need another '.06 as I have two reliable .303s and a nice .270 to fill that niche. Just love the "oldness" of it.

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    Moderator kingfisherktn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sayak View Post
    I Just love the "oldness" of it.
    Isn't that like 'calling the kettle black"?

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    Quote Originally Posted by kingfisherktn View Post
    Isn't that like 'calling the kettle black"?
    I like old stuff 'cause old stuff is well made and has cool history behind it that I can identify with. You know, kind of like you and your collection of clubs and spears

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    Supporting Member Amigo Will's Avatar
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    I have picked up a Nagant and just got a U.S1917 and the quaility of the old stuff is wonderfull.You will enjoy the old Remmy go for it.
    Now left only to be a turd in the forrest and the circle will be complete.Use me as I have used you

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    Member sayak's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by kingfisherktn View Post
    Isn't that like 'calling the kettle black"?
    And anyway, smartatz, I don't really like the "oldness" of me (especially when I roll out of bed in the morning).

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    Member sayak's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Amigo Will View Post
    I have picked up a Nagant and just got a U.S1917 and the quaility of the old stuff is wonderfull.You will enjoy the old Remmy go for it.
    Ah... I passed up a sported 1917 at a pawn shop last year cause I didn't know that much about milsups then, and I have been kicking myself ever since.

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