Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 25

Thread: reloading belted ammo

  1. #1
    Member akula682's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    North Pole
    Posts
    1,187

    Default reloading belted ammo

    is it as big of a PITA as people say? what special things do you need to look out for/ do?
    Josh
    Back in Afghanistan, I hope for the last time.

  2. #2

    Default

    Not even a tiny little issue. Some guns (I've got one) need the die backed off slightly so the case head spaces on the shoulder rather than the belt, but the vast majority are as straight forward as non-belted. Many times the fluff you hear is from guys pimping specialized gear they think everyone else should buy. Not.

  3. #3
    Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Eureka MT
    Posts
    3,048

    Default

    What BrownBear said. I partial full length all bottle neck cases whether belted or not, then they all headspace snugly from the shoulder. I believe this helps accuracy, works the brass less and helps prevent head separation. To me, the belt just fixes a problem that doesn't exist on bottle neck cases. It is usefull on cases like the 458 Win but still no problem.

  4. #4
    Member akula682's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    North Pole
    Posts
    1,187

    Default

    im feeling better already. this may make me re-think my choice for my new TC encore barrel. I was planning on a 338WM, but i had to ask the forum here for advice when i saw a lot of people complaining about belted ammo.

    so you only half size the brass? when i started to reload i was told never to do that, either shoulder or full.
    Josh
    Back in Afghanistan, I hope for the last time.

  5. #5
    New member
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    14

    Default

    I do about a 3/4 size on the neck for my 7mm Rem Mag loads. Never had an issue.

  6. #6
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    SwampView AK, Overlooking Mt. Mckinley and Points Beyond.
    Posts
    8,808

    Default

    Just FL size them like anything else.

    If they are HARD to FL size, and you can't get them sized enough for your chamber, get a Neck sizing die.

    So-called Partial FL sizing won't always work, depending on your dies and chamber dimensions. A longer explanation might be necessary, but I'll leave it at that.

    Smitty of the North
    Walk Slow, and Drink a Lotta Water.
    Has it ever occurred to you, that Nothing ever occurs to God? Adrien Rodgers.
    You can't out-give God.

  7. #7
    Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Eureka MT
    Posts
    3,048

    Default

    It's more than half sizing. If you haven't shot the brass in your rifle, you may need to full length size it the first time. After it's been shot in your chamber it's then ready for a partial size. I usually adjust the die so I get about 9/10 of the neck sized. This leaves a small band of neck just ahead of the shoulder that is full chamber neck size. This centers the front of the case in the front of the chamber. It also leaves the back of the case a little closer fit to the chamber than FL sizing. After a few firings you may have to get closer to FL sizing in order to set the shoulder back a couple of thousand's so it will chamber easily. I do this with all bottleneck cases whether belted or not. It helps prevent excessive case stretching which leads to case head separation. Doing it this way, you could lathe the belts off without ill effect. There may be times when this would not work but I haven't run into them yet. The thing I don't like about neck sizing only for hunting rounds is that the case has very little room for crud, dirt ,pocket lint or anything else between the case body and the chamber. It's fine for target shooting but doesn't give much room for error in the field. There is a whole lot of personal preference involved in loading proceedures. My way is my choice of a compromise between FL sizing which can leave more clearance than needed and necksizing which can leave less clearance than I want. I think most of the problem that happens with belted cases is from pushing the shoulder back too far which leaves room for the case to move forward just ahead of the belt and causing head separation. Neck sizing or Partial sizing will stop this. I think this happens on nonbelted cases as well especially in a gun with a chamber with headspace on the long end of spec.

  8. #8
    Supporting Member iofthetaiga's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Tanana Valley AK
    Posts
    7,216

    Default

    Sizing belted cases is no different from sizing beltless cases.

    All my FL dies reside in their cases, unused. I only neck size, with neck dies, and have never had an issue. My reloaded (multiple times) cartridges chamber just as easily and reliably as unfired factory fodder, perhaps better. Of course, YMMV.
    ...he who knows nothing is nearer to truth than he whose mind is filled with falsehoods & errors. ~Thomas Jefferson
    I would rather have a mind opened by wonder than one closed by belief. ~Gerry Spence
    The last thing Alaska needs is another bigot. ~member Catch It
    #Resist

  9. #9
    Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    welfare state of Alaska
    Posts
    5,153

    Default

    Big question is the origin of the your brass. I use a lot of range brass I pick up for free and it won't always fit my rifles. I usually size it the first time in FL Small Base dies and then FL size the cases in standard dies after that for hunting loads - for target only loads I will neck side if the brass is going back in the same gun.

    I have a set of .458 Win. dies that have proven to be real brass saver from time to time. For some reason the .458 die sizes the cases down more just above the belt than any of the other dies. I have so on occasion had to run my belted brass thru it to get it to chamber. Nice thing is that you can run any brass with a standard .300 H&H case thru it as only the base is sized. I've even ran loaded ammo thru it to get it to chamber.


    Quote Originally Posted by iofthetaiga View Post
    Sizing belted cases is no different from sizing beltless cases.

    All my FL dies reside in their cases, unused. I only neck size, with neck dies, and have never had an issue. My reloaded (multiple times) cartridges chamber just as easily and reliably as unfired factory fodder, perhaps better. Of course, YMMV.
    Living the urban lifestyle so I can pay my way and for my family's needs, and support my country. And you?
    ".. ask not what your country can do for you, ask what you can do for your country" JFK

  10. #10
    Supporting Member iofthetaiga's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Tanana Valley AK
    Posts
    7,216

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by tvfinak View Post
    Big question is the origin of the your brass....
    This of course is true. If the brass in question did not originate from your chamber, FL sizing may likely be in order the first time.
    ...he who knows nothing is nearer to truth than he whose mind is filled with falsehoods & errors. ~Thomas Jefferson
    I would rather have a mind opened by wonder than one closed by belief. ~Gerry Spence
    The last thing Alaska needs is another bigot. ~member Catch It
    #Resist

  11. #11

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by akula682 View Post
    so you only half size the brass? when i started to reload i was told never to do that, either shoulder or full.
    I wouldn't try to "solve" a problem until you confirm it exists in your gun with your brass. If it loads easy after sizing normally and you're getting good case life, carry on and don't change a thing.

    In my rifle the cases reload and shoot fine, but case life was awfully short. I backed the die off a couple of revolutions and sized. It fed a little tight in the gun, so I started moving the die down a quarter of a turn at a time until it just kissed the shoulder of a smoked case. It was still very slightly tight in the chamber for a hunting load, so I set the die down another 1/8 turn. Now the cases chamber easy and I doubled case life.

    It turns out that with the die set at "factory spec" so the case head spaced on belt, the shoulder was being set back too far. In adjusting the die as I described I'm full length sizing while headspacing on the shoulder rather than the belt.

  12. #12
    Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    895

    Default

    I have been setting the shoulder back .003" belted or not unless I am shooting for accuracy, then I neck size. The belt thing never made much sense to me. If I had unlimited resources and wanted a 338, I would opt for the 338 RCM or the 338-06 and forget the belt.

  13. #13
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    SwampView AK, Overlooking Mt. Mckinley and Points Beyond.
    Posts
    8,808

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by BrownBear View Post
    I wouldn't try to "solve" a problem until you confirm it exists in your gun with your brass. If it loads easy after sizing normally and you're getting good case life, carry on and don't change a thing.

    In my rifle the cases reload and shoot fine, but case life was awfully short. I backed the die off a couple of revolutions and sized. It fed a little tight in the gun, so I started moving the die down a quarter of a turn at a time until it just kissed the shoulder of a smoked case. It was still very slightly tight in the chamber for a hunting load, so I set the die down another 1/8 turn. Now the cases chamber easy and I doubled case life.

    It turns out that with the die set at "factory spec" so the case head spaced on belt, the shoulder was being set back too far. In adjusting the die as I described I'm full length sizing while headspacing on the shoulder rather than the belt.
    BB:
    I agree with your 1 st paragraph. However……

    In MY rifle, (Early 7mm Rem Mag) if I FL resize, it’s gotta be set to adjust all the way, and THEN SOME, to get them to chamber easily. Partial sizing doesn’t work, PERIOD.

    I’ve used two different die sets, and I think it’s due to the chamber size.

    The way, I’ve interpreted things is that, I’m sizing the shoulder, 1 st, and the shoulder increases in length. Then the case has to be sized until the shoulder is pushed back again.

    As, I said above, I hafta adjust the FL die to the max, and then some, to get them to chamber at all. I use plenty of lube, and a heavy press. (Redding Big Boss.)

    Fired rounds chamber easily, and now, I NECK size them, and that works great.

    As to “Factory Specs.” FLs for belted rounds, often have very short shoulders, (no big problem, because the round headspaces on the belt, and the NEW brass stretches to fit the chamber.

    That doesn’t mean that FL Loading Dies set the shoulder “back too far”, although that could be the case.

    I believe that there ARE problems in loading for Belted cases, but the problem doesn’t lie with the Belts. It is the sloppy chambers in older rifles chambered for Belted Cartridges. I’ve both SEEN and heard of them.

    Back to your 1 st paragraph. I handloaded for two different 338 Win Mags, and encountered no problems whatever. I FL sized and loaded them, just like I would do a Rimless case.

    Like you say,,,

    “I wouldn't try to "solve" a problem until you confirm it exists in your gun with your brass. If it loads easy after sizing normally and you're getting good case life, carry on and don't change a thing.”

    IMO, all the things, written about hand loading Belted Cartridges, causes more problems than the Belts on cases ever could.

    I like Belts on cartridge cases. Like, Rimmed cases, they provide safer headspacing.

    As to “Case Life”, that’s probably not a huge issue for most of us. It’s never been an issue for me, based on the number of times a case can be loaded anyway.

    Smitty of the North
    Walk Slow, and Drink a Lotta Water.
    Has it ever occurred to you, that Nothing ever occurs to God? Adrien Rodgers.
    You can't out-give God.

  14. #14
    Moderator
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Midwest
    Posts
    4,431

    Default

    This question comes up a lot and it really doesn't need to.

    Obviously a sizing die is meant to size a case and if we full length size a bottlenecked rifle case, it should fit the chamber of our rifle. There are examples of sizing dies being slightly over sized and chamber being slightly tight and this stacking of tolerances can be a problem with any cartridge belted or not. The belted magnum cases were designed to headspace on the belt. The "official headspace" is not adjusted at all by the sizing die, as it is with the non belted cases when full length resizing. Not that it will cause a problem, other than shorten case life, when we full length size a belted case, but often better results can be obtained by not pushing the shoulder back. When we f/l size a case, be it belted or not, usually it pushes the shoulder back a few thousandths. This creates some "slop" in the case that will be filled when it is fired. Each firing will then tend to stretch the case and brass flows from the base of the case into the side wall each time it is stretched. With the belted case this "flow" of brass is from the wall just above the belt, up the case wall. This will, after repeated firings in same chambers, cause the case to thin just forward of the belt and this can lead to a case separation at that point. When such an event happens it is a problem to get the forward section out of the case out of the chamber.

    There isn't generally a problem unless the sizing die and the chamber are dimensioned such as to make this stretching excessive and this can lead to case separation after only a few firings. Generally it isn't a problem for most loaders. I like BrownBears approach...if it isn't a problem yet, don't fix it.

    When hand loading ammo for any rifle it is generally considered a good practice to only size what is necessary to allow the round to chamber easily and extract freely. This does two things for us. It gets maximum case life from the brass and makes for a better chamber fit which usually makes more accurate ammo.

    Die makers are good, bad and mediocre. I don't want to get into which is best but will tell you there are only four brands of dies that I own, of the well over a hundred different dies sets that I have. Many are custom and wildcat dies but I have found these four that I want on my bench. Redding, RCBS, Forster and Dillion. I may prefer one of these over another for a particular application, such as my RCBS for straight, rimmed rifle cases. The Forsters are a complete set of the Weatherby calibers I bought years ago when I no other company made anything that truly fit the Weatherby chambers. The Dillon dies are in the oddball pistol calibers, 9x23, 9x25, 41 AE, etc and they are very good in the Dillon presses. Redding has made about 60 sets of custom dies for me from my own reamer drawings and there has not been any dimension problem with them. Custom dies match my custom chambers.

    The point of all this is that I believe that many problems in sizing cases comes from these issues; Improperly adjusted dies, improperly made (dimensioned) dies or poorly designed dies. I'll only be guilty of the first on occasion.
    Last edited by Murphy; 12-18-2011 at 08:10. Reason: spelling
    Is there nothing so sacred on this earth that you aren't willing to kill or die for?



  15. #15
    Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Eureka MT
    Posts
    3,048

    Default

    Hey Smitty:
    If your having problems getting the case sized enough to the point of forcing the die against the shell holder, just grind a couple of thousands off the shell holder. It will releive a lot of pressure/stress from the press and the die and can be done with a whet stone and a few minutes of work. However, if neck sizing is working for you, there's really no reason to fix anything. I'm thinking you may have a short fat chamber. Pushing the extra fat sides back may be forcing the shoulder forward and if you have a chamber on the short end of spec this could account for having to force the die against the shell holder to get the case to fit. If this is the problem, partial sizing would not work for that rifle. It would be interesting to measure a fired case from center of shoulder to the base then partial FL size it and remeasure to see if you are gaining length in the sizing process and how much. I think I will see if I can get a few minutes in the loading room tomorrow and check this out.
    akula:
    Thanks for bringing this up. It's got me thinking out of my box.

  16. #16
    Moderator
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Midwest
    Posts
    4,431

    Default

    Smitty, I don't want to criticize you at all here and I'm not saying what you do is not right but something here makes me think you approach this much different than I do. I'm going to try to understand what you're sayin' here.


    Quote Originally Posted by Smitty of the North View Post
    BB:
    I agree with your 1 st paragraph. However……

    In MY rifle, (Early 7mm Rem Mag) if I FL resize, it’s gotta be set to adjust all the way, and THEN SOME, to get them to chamber easily. Partial sizing doesn’t work, PERIOD.

    Die makers are much better at maintaining dimensions of their sizing dies than rifle makers are of their chambers. Some rifle chambers, particularly Remington, are just larger than others. The trend is to make chambers on the large side of the tolerance envelope. Its a pressure thing.

    I’ve used two different die sets, and I think it’s due to the chamber size.

    The way, I’ve interpreted things is that, I’m sizing the shoulder, 1 st, and the shoulder increases in length. Then the case has to be sized until the shoulder is pushed back again.

    A shoulder is never pushed too far forward in firing than what will re-chamber in the same rifle except to say if it is eccentric or lop sided. The brass expands to fit the chamber. The shoulder should be pushed back, when resizing, on hunting loads but no more than a few thousandths. The case wall need be swaged back a few thousandths also and this, if over done, will cause the case to grow and that moves the shoulder forward. This can cause a case to not fit after f/l sizing. Sizing a case to re-chamber will normally be done before the die contacts the shell holder in all but a very few chambers. The belt has a place to rest in the chamber. This belt dimension is very poorly maintained by many ammo makers both in thickness and diameter and rifle makers seem to be unable to keep it in specs also. I've seen many so close, such as in the post '94 version of the model 70. I have found many M70s that would stick the belt in the chamber of factory loaded ammo. Why this is I don't know. The problem with belted cases is not for the reloader but for ammo makers and rifle makers chamber....with the safe headspace belt. The rest of the case dimensions are not critical and ammo makers seem to make ammo that is so sloppy. The same is true with rifle chambers....the thing that matters is that head to belt dim, not belt diameter, not head to shoulder dim, a just ream it and ship it mentality.

    Now comes the handloader who tries to make resized ammo from well dimensioned dies, fit a poorly dimensioned chamber. Problemo!!

    This belt also will expand when fired. This expansion is in direct proportion to the max chamber pressure. When it expands, it never expands uniformly. It is now eccentric, (like me). Now it won't fit the round chamber belt recess. Also anneal varies from maker to maker and lot to lot and changes each time it is fired. Sizing dies do not size this belt. This poorly shaped and improperly dimensioned belt, whether from firing or from improper dimensioned brass, is now not compatible with your rifles chamber. Sometimes when we screw the sizer down to meet the shell holder, some dies usually RCBS, will reshape this belt slightly, allowing it to fit our chamber better. I think this is what you're doing here.

    As, I said above, I hafta adjust the FL die to the max, and then some, to get them to chamber at all. I use plenty of lube, and a heavy press. (Redding Big Boss.)

    Fired rounds chamber easily, and now, I NECK size them, and that works great.

    I don't understand this. Didn't you fire the brass once before you reloaded it??? What do you mean neck size? With a neck sizing die?

    As to “Factory Specs.” FLs for belted rounds, often have very short shoulders, (no big problem, because the round headspaces on the belt, and the NEW brass stretches to fit the chamber.

    Again, no habla!! There is nothing short about a 338 or7mm Mag shoulder. Plenty of room to headspace on the shoulder solidly.
    And yes new brass does streeeeetch to fit the chamber. It is this stretching that, if allowed to stretch each time, will after about three firings, separate if the chamber is a little long (sloppy) to begin with.


    That doesn’t mean that FL Loading Dies set the shoulder “back too far”, although that could be the case.

    Yes. Too far is a relative term but yes it could and whether belted or not that is something to avoid. Cases that grow in length and must be re-trimmed after two firings are stretching too much. There is a min and max for case length. The window is .010", if trimmed to minimum, they should not grow to max in five or six firings.

    I believe that there ARE problems in loading for Belted cases, but the problem doesn’t lie with the Belts. It is the sloppy chambers in older rifles chambered for Belted Cartridges. I’ve both SEEN and heard of them.

    You are so correct here, sir.

    Back to your 1 st paragraph. I handloaded for two different 338 Win Mags, and encountered no problems whatever. I FL sized and loaded them, just like I would do a Rimless case.

    Like you say,,,

    “I wouldn't try to "solve" a problem until you confirm it exists in your gun with your brass. If it loads easy after sizing normally and you're getting good case life, carry on and don't change a thing.”

    IMO, all the things, written about hand loading Belted Cartridges, causes more problems than the Belts on cases ever could.

    Ok. I'll shut up soon.

    I like Belts on cartridge cases. Like, Rimmed cases, they provide safer headspacing.

    Hogwash!!!

    As to “Case Life”, that’s probably not a huge issue for most of us. It’s never been an issue for me, based on the number of times a case can be loaded anyway.

    Yep! Throw them away after about three or four good shots. (Scrap brass)

    Smitty of the North
    Is there nothing so sacred on this earth that you aren't willing to kill or die for?



  17. #17
    Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    O'Fallon, MO
    Posts
    195

    Default

    I certainly agree on the sloppy chambers. I had a Ruger #1 in 375 H&H a while back, and saved about 80 rounds of factory brass for it. I now load for 416 Rem mag, and thought I would fire form some of my old 375 brass to use for cast bullet shooting for practice.

    When I ran the 375 brass through my full length sizing die for the 416 to decap and prep, they would not even chamber in my 416 mod 70 Safari Express. The side wall area immediately in front of the belt was too large to chamber, so I screwed the sizing die all the way down to contact the shell holder, and they still would not chamber. Those warm factory loads expanded so much that the sizing die would not get them down to chamber in my mod. 70.

    I guess I'll have to try those collet dies for belted mags.

  18. #18
    Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    welfare state of Alaska
    Posts
    5,153

    Default

    I just run my belted cases with expansion just above the belt through my .458 Winchester die. Even works for loaded ammo - the .458 die only hits them at the bottom half of the case.

    So far this has worked with 7mm Rem., .300 Win Mag, .338 Win Mag., .375 H&H, and my .40 Wildcat in a variety of rifles including Winchesters, Rugers, Remingtons, and various mausers. Lot cheaper than buying a collet die esp. since I already have a .458 die.


    Quote Originally Posted by drow View Post
    I certainly agree on the sloppy chambers. I had a Ruger #1 in 375 H&H a while back, and saved about 80 rounds of factory brass for it. I now load for 416 Rem mag, and thought I would fire form some of my old 375 brass to use for cast bullet shooting for practice.

    When I ran the 375 brass through my full length sizing die for the 416 to decap and prep, they would not even chamber in my 416 mod 70 Safari Express. The side wall area immediately in front of the belt was too large to chamber, so I screwed the sizing die all the way down to contact the shell holder, and they still would not chamber. Those warm factory loads expanded so much that the sizing die would not get them down to chamber in my mod. 70.

    I guess I'll have to try those collet dies for belted mags.
    Living the urban lifestyle so I can pay my way and for my family's needs, and support my country. And you?
    ".. ask not what your country can do for you, ask what you can do for your country" JFK

  19. #19
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    SwampView AK, Overlooking Mt. Mckinley and Points Beyond.
    Posts
    8,808

    Default

    I apologize if I took over the thread.

    Thanks to everyone who responded to the problem I mentioned.

    I’ll try to answer Murphy’s questions.

    Murphy:
    It’s always possible that I’ve misinterpreted things, but at this point, I’m not yet convinced. I might try FL resizing again with the 7 mag though.

    You seem to accept most of what I’ve said, and that’s encouraging.

    I never get tired of reading what you have to say. Be as long winded as you like.

    This is the first time I’ve heard that the BELT, can “expand”. Or, that a sizing die could reshape it. If that is the case, perhaps, there IS a SERIOUS problem in hand loading Belted cases.

    I was using fired brass, and not from very HOT loads.

    Cases are trimmed properly.

    I’m using an RCBS Neck Sizing Die, NOW, because of the difficulty in FL sizing the brass, fired in my chamber. I use the NECK sizing die in the Set for my 7mm Weatherby too.

    I know some folks believe that Belted Cases are NOT stronger, but they sure LOOK stronger to me.

    I dunno how many times, I can reload the brass, but I have some that have been shot on the high side of several times. My difficulty comes early on, though.

    I can understand how a short shoulder would stretch, over and over, and result in case head separation, or shorten case life, but since it’s never happened to ME, I tend to think it’s overdone, as a problem.

    IME, if I “partial FL resize” a 7mm RM case with a FL sizing die, by the time I get 3 / 4 (est.) of the way down the neck, the shoulder would have been squeezed and the shoulder lengthened.

    Of course, I could size a TINY portion of the neck, and it would work, but many cartridges, 7mm RM, for example, have a short neck to begin with.

    I’m not EVER trying to be controversial or sound like an expert, but often, I honesty doubt the conventional theories, about how things SHOULD be done because of my own howbeit limited, experiences.

    As a result, I tend to think that “partial FL sizing” is something of a non-issue. AND, not needed in most situations, anyway.

    Maybe I'll start another thread on "Things I Doubt", and "Maybe" I'll learn something.

    Thanks
    Smitty of the North
    Walk Slow, and Drink a Lotta Water.
    Has it ever occurred to you, that Nothing ever occurs to God? Adrien Rodgers.
    You can't out-give God.

  20. #20
    Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Eureka MT
    Posts
    3,048

    Default

    Smitty
    I don't think neck sizing only is a bad idea nor do I think FL sizing is a bad idea as a general rule. In some cases FL sizing works the brass more than needed an in some cases neck sizing only isn't enough after the third or fourth firing. Partial sizing is just a compromise of the two. It sizes more than the neck but not as much as FL and doesn't set the neck back at all. It does give a little more clearance on the side walls than neck sizing to aid loading in less than clean conditions without pushing the shoulder back. Like neck sizing you will probably have to set the shoulder back a couple thousands every few firings. If you have a fat chamber you may very well be forcing the shoulder forward as the case walls are being pushed in. In this case, partial sizing would not work and you would need to either FL or neck size. I had an early Rem 700 in 7mm mag (1964/65?) and I would FL size them with the die hard against the shell holder. I got case head separations twice. Fortunately they were both in the sizing die and not in my rifle. Those are really hard to get out with no case head on them. I now use mostly partial sizing with good success. I have a 243Win that has a very loose chamber and I use a neck sizer for it. I don't think any of these methods are wrong although sometimes one method works better that another. Part sizing just a tiny bit probably would be a bad idea. I don't think you would have much neck tension. A lot of people make a lot bigger deal of the belted cases than I do. I even head space my 300H&H off the shoulder using the partial sizing method and it seems to work fine. I think the belt is just a worthless bit of fluff for all but a straight case. Go ahead and flame away. I've got my aspestos underware on.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •