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Thread: Vertical potatos in boxes? Do tell!

  1. #1
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    Default Vertical potatos in boxes? Do tell!

    So I haven't done much with potatoes yet and I've seen folks plant them in old tires (which I don't want to do) so let's see some pics or some ideas on potato boxes.
    How do you harvest from the bottom, or do you just wait till end of season and take the whole works down? Is there any particular strain that does better with this method? What are your yeilds?


    Thanks,

    Mountaintrekker

  2. #2
    Supporting Member bullbuster's Avatar
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    I got tired of the good old folks next door beating me in the spud department. They use raised beds about 3.5' x 6' x 2' wide. They grow potatoes, beets, lettuce, zucchini, radishes etc.
    I went with my usual ground patch, but also filled some 30 gallon rubber maid totes to try the seed potatoes out in. They did great. The highest yield variety turned out to be those blue Peruvian spuds. Yukon Gold was next.
    I have already got a large wooden crate from work that will be the start of my raised bed collection.
    Live life and love it
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    Member JOAT's Avatar
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    The basic concept of the continuously producing potato box is to place 4 corner posts first and then wall up the sides with 6" boards. You put on the first 2 or 3 rows of wood to start with, fill it with soil and plant them. As the plants grow upward, you would add a row of boards and fill that with soil. The stem area in contact with the new soil will start to produce tubers. When the box is run up to full height, you can start harvesting the first potatos from the very bottom of the box. Remove a board from the bottom and root around in the soil to pull the oldest spuds. When done, push the soil back in and put the board back on. The next week you can do the same with the next row up, etc. At the end of the season, you take all the boards off and harvest everything that's left.
    Winter is Coming...

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    Member garnede's Avatar
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    Here is a link to an article on growing potatoes vertically.

    http://tipnut.com/grow-potatoes/
    It ain't about the # of pounds of meat we bring back, nor about how much we spent to go do it. Its about seeing what no one else sees.

    http://wouldieatitagainfoodblog.blogspot.com/

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    Thanks for the info! I'm going to go big this coming year and want to stock away a couple hundred pounds.



    Mountaintrekker

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    Member greythorn3's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mountaintrekker View Post
    Thanks for the info! I'm going to go big this coming year and want to stock away a couple hundred pounds.



    Mountaintrekker
    how do you plan to keep them potatoes in good shape storing them? whats the trick?
    Semper Fi!

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    Member JOAT's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by greythorn3 View Post
    how do you plan to keep them potatoes in good shape storing them? whats the trick?
    The Russians perfected long term potato storage long ago... just turn it into vodka.
    Winter is Coming...

    Go GeocacheAlaska!

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