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Thread: New .358 bullets Nosler 200 grain Accubond and Barnes 200 grain tipped triple shock

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    Member mainer_in_ak's Avatar
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    Default New .358 bullets Nosler 200 grain Accubond and Barnes 200 grain tipped triple shock

    For the folks who ever had the idea to hunt sheep or goats with your 350 rem mag or 358 winchester,
    it looks like Nosler has come out with a 200 grain accubond. This should allow some serious velocity, and down range energy with less issues of taking up case capacity in the shorter action cartridges.

    http://www.nosler.com/New-Products.aspx

    I guess barnes offers a balistic tipped 200 grainer too if no one knew about it:

    http://www.midwayusa.com/product/557...tail-box-of-50

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    Ya, I know. I have my 35 whelen load worked up with the 225g partition. I could use a bit more velocity and stepping down 25 grains ought to do the trick. Since I am shooting out of an auto loader, my velocities tend to be on the low side. The 200g TTSX looks like a new project real soon. My current load has all the moxy I need for the accuracy limitations of the gun to about 200 yards. But, then who says that the 200g TTSX won't shoot lights out and maybe extend that range a bit??? Guess I won't know what is around the corner 'till I get there.

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    Quote Originally Posted by mainer_in_ak View Post
    For the folks who ever had the idea to hunt sheep or goats with your 350 rem mag or 358 winchester,
    it looks like Nosler has come out with a 200 grain accubond. This should allow some serious velocity, and down range energy with less issues of taking up case capacity in the shorter action cartridges.

    http://www.nosler.com/New-Products.aspx

    I guess barnes offers a balistic tipped 200 grainer too if no one knew about it:

    http://www.midwayusa.com/product/557...tail-box-of-50
    That's good to know about the Nosler. I wish that 300 grainer they show in .338 was also in .358!

    I haven't personally checked, but I presumed the Barnes 200 gr was every bit as long as the 225 AB due to being all copper so the OAL/seating depth problem would persist with it.

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    Quote Originally Posted by evandailey View Post
    That's good to know about the Nosler. I wish that 300 grainer they show in .338 was also in .358!

    I haven't personally checked, but I presumed the Barnes 200 gr was every bit as long as the 225 AB due to being all copper so the OAL/seating depth problem would persist with it.
    The 200 TTSX is a bit shorter than the the 225 AB, I should measure them to give an exact number. OAL is not an issue in my BLR (.358 Win) with the TTSX. The b.c. of the 200 TTSX is not great, but with the velocity increase it does help to stretch the range on the .35s without sacrificing terminal performance. The TTSX has quickly become my projectile of choice in both the .358 Win and the 35 Whelen. For deer, sheep and such the 200 AB may be a better choice, but around here the game grows a little larger and the TTSX gives ample penetration on moose, brown bear and such.
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    Good news.... My 350 Rem Mag M77MKII shoots nice groups with the 200 grain TSX at 2,900 fps. So it might really like either of the two new offerings.
    Evandaily,::: have you tried the 280 grain Swift A-Frames in 358 cal. My 350 rem Mag with a 1 in 12 twist really likes them.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Float Pilot View Post
    Good news.... My 350 Rem Mag M77MKII shoots nice groups with the 200 grain TSX at 2,900 fps. So it might really like either of the two new offerings.
    Evandaily,::: have you tried the 280 grain Swift A-Frames in 358 cal. My 350 rem Mag with a 1 in 12 twist really likes them.
    Does your rifle have a 1/16" twist? How does that 280 grainer perform? That sounds like a darned good load for Alaska! Not too far off from a 9.6x62 286 grain load.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Float Pilot View Post
    Good news.... My 350 Rem Mag M77MKII shoots nice groups with the 200 grain TSX at 2,900 fps. So it might really like either of the two new offerings.
    Evandaily,::: have you tried the 280 grain Swift A-Frames in 358 cal. My 350 rem Mag with a 1 in 12 twist really likes them.
    I have not. I have thought about it for kicks, but there's just no real need for them here in WV. 400 lb. pigs are about as big and mean as things get around here, and the 225 AB's have done the job just fine on those. If I ever make it to AK or Africa the 280 A-frame will be at the top of my list though.

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    Moderator Daveinthebush's Avatar
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    Sounds like a good bullet. I like the 225 Sierras but a 200 Nosler should be a good round in my .35 Whelen and the .350 Magnum. Sounds ideal for elk, moose and such.

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    Quote Originally Posted by mainer_in_ak View Post
    Does your rifle have a 1/16" twist? How does that 280 grainer perform? That sounds like a darned good load for Alaska! Not too far off from a 9.6x62 286 grain load.
    I have a 1/12 Ruger in 35 Whelen. My best two loads for accuracy are the 250 A-Frame, and the 310 Woodleigh. 56.3 Gr of RL-15 moves that 310 gr at 2370 FPS, and did VERY nicely on a moose this fall. .358 hole going in, golf ball going out. Bullet passed through both shoulders, and meat was good right up to the bullet hole... no bloodshot meat at all. Woodleigh recommends 1800 fps or greater for the Weldcore, so the Whelen is a great match for it.



    May be that I have a 1/12 barrel, but I've never had luck with the lighter bullets. Anything lighter than 250 patterns like a full choke. But, heavy bullets for <200 yds is exaclty why I bought a 35.

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    For some reason or another Ruger made the stainless M77MKII all-weather 350 Rem Mag with a 1 in 12 twist while the blued models had a 1 in 16 twist rate.
    I had to change the feed ramp on mine, open up the feed rails on the magazine, re-crown and glass bed the whole darn thing, and a few other mods, like a front sight and back-up peep sight. I was looking for a 35 Whelen when i found this rifle, so I had to make-do with the 350 Rem Mag as second choice.

    If you can find any of the old 275 grain Banes originals in 35 caliber, they work very nicely. I also bought a bunch of the HAWK bonded 250 grain bullets but my rifle does not like them.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Float Pilot View Post
    For some reason or another Ruger made the stainless M77MKII all-weather 350 Rem Mag with a 1 in 12 twist while the blued models had a 1 in 16 twist rate.
    I had to change the feed ramp on mine, open up the feed rails on the magazine, re-crown and glass bed the whole darn thing, and a few other mods, like a front sight and back-up peep sight. I was looking for a 35 Whelen when i found this rifle, so I had to make-do with the 350 Rem Mag as second choice.

    If you can find any of the old 275 grain Banes originals in 35 caliber, they work very nicely. I also bought a bunch of the HAWK bonded 250 grain bullets but my rifle does not like them.
    Yeah, I have no idea why ruger has the different twist rates. According to their website, I have a 1/16 (I have a newer Hawkeye in stainless). I was pleasantly surprised when I measured the twist rate using the cleaning rod method, and came up with 1/12. I started experimenting with 225 partitions, and 200 TSX's, and had horrible accuracy. I used A LOT of JB bore paste, and restocked it with a full bedded Hogue, and accuracy improved a bit. Once I tried the heavier bullets, I started getting hunting accuracy. Not as good as yours, but good enough. (1.5-2" with both the 250 and 310's)

    I got lucky and wasn't really looking for a new rifle, just picking up some reloading supplies at boondocks when a conversation with the counter guy led to the 35 whelen Hawkeye. They also had some CDL's (wood/blued) but I went with the less expensive stainless Ruger.

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    The new .338 300gr Accubond is impressive.

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    Re-crowning mine made a huge difference. Plus I bedded the entire barrel channel. The feed ramp on mine looked like a wood rasp when I obtained the rifle. It was actually deforming the bullet tips.
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    Those results are impressive. Now that we're in the off season, maybe I'll check and see if Greg Coleman is still around to recrown it... worth a shot.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Float Pilot View Post
    Re-crowning mine made a huge difference. Plus I bedded the entire barrel channel. The feed ramp on mine looked like a wood rasp when I obtained the rifle. It was actually deforming the bullet tips.
    Yip,

    Free floating, cutting one coil off the trigger spring/polishing trigger, and glass bedding a ruger 77 give extremely noticeable difference in accuracy. The most accurate rifle I ever owned was a ruger 223 stainless model 77. It gave one hole groups-1/4" groups with any 55 grain boat tail bullet after performing the above mentioned modifications.

    It looks like you have what could be considered an ultimate sheep/goat rifle that can handle any issue with a bear. Actually, you probably have what I'd consider a do everything/hike any where type rifle for Alaska. You could essentially drop your scope/long range load after downing a sheep, and have the open sights ready to handle that huge 280 grain Swift A frame. That 350 rem mag is quite a darned versatile cartridge for light rifles.

    The only other ruger that could come close to the versatility of your's would be the ruger compact magnum in 338 RCM. Similar case dimensions/case capacity, but a slightly smaller caliber. Still has open sights, and I'm certain a heavy-for-caliber round nose could be loaded for a bear protection load in sheep/goat country. I've handled and shot the 338 RCM and it was plenty light and compact. I'm certain that rifle would have similar recoil, and feel to your rifle.

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    I keep waiting for Ruger to pick up on my stock storage compartment.
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    I have shot the 200TSX some in my Whelen. 2700fps and scary accuracy, shot a caribou through the neck with one, it died. I even fooled with some old semi spitzer 180 Speers for Mach speeds, got 2900 and change from my 20" bbl all the while producing goodnuff accuracy, shot a caribou with one of them too. It died as well, but the biggest piece of bullet I found was about a 1/8" square chunk of jacket. I have since returned solely to the 250gr roundnose at a leisurely 2500fps, just really gives a satisfying thump when it connects. For me the 35s are killin guns, for doing the job on Alaska's bigger game at modest real world ranges, day in day out with no complaints. When I go on my sheep expedition next fall I will, with some regret I'm sure, leave Col. Whelen behind, and grab up the new 257Wby I'm in the process of building, just in case that ram is out past the 300yd comfort zone I have with the 35.

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    This thread got me wondering, so I looked at the Barnes newest reloading manual for the whelen and 200g bullets. The max velocities are about 2800 fps. I then looked at the 225g bullets, they are about the same, no more than 100fps difference. I then looked at Nosler bullets in 225g and the max velocities are about 2800 fps. There was no data for a 200g nosler bullet. It does not seem like a good trade to shoot the 200g TTSX instead of a 225g TSX based on velocities or B.C. unless the real world is different than paper or you are getting some good accuracy. I don't think I would trade the 200g TTSX for the 225g nosler bullets either based on velocities and B.C. The 200g vs 225g Nosler accubonds are inconclusive on paper since there is no data. I would think they would be a bit faster than the 225g, and 200g going whelen speeds is plenty enough power for most all game.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Daved View Post
    This thread got me wondering, so I looked at the Barnes newest reloading manual for the whelen and 200g bullets. The max velocities are about 2800 fps. I then looked at the 225g bullets, they are about the same, no more than 100fps difference. I then looked at Nosler bullets in 225g and the max velocities are about 2800 fps. There was no data for a 200g nosler bullet. It does not seem like a good trade to shoot the 200g TTSX instead of a 225g TSX based on velocities or B.C. unless the real world is different than paper or you are getting some good accuracy. I don't think I would trade the 200g TTSX for the 225g nosler bullets either based on velocities and B.C. The 200g vs 225g Nosler accubonds are inconclusive on paper since there is no data. I would think they would be a bit faster than the 225g, and 200g going whelen speeds is plenty enough power for most all game.

    That is why we reload. :-) We get to play and find out what works best. You are right. There are always trade-offs. I think for up here the 225 is ideal. One moose, 2 caribou. Both never moved an inch unless you consider downward into the movement figures.

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    In some cases, with some rifle magazines, the overall length of the bullet becomes a problem. For instance I think the magazine box on the Remington 350 rem mags are shorter than the Ruger's. Even with the work I did on my Ruger's magazine box, I cannot get the longer bullets into the case neck without having to go so deep that the ogive is well into the case, thus leaving a big gap. They are also so deep into he case that they take up powder room.
    And of course the Barnes non-lead bullets are longer than lead core bullets for their weight, thus creating a problem in some cases.

    I have loaded lead core 200 grain bullets in my 22 inch Ruger to just over 3,000 fps. The 200 grain Barnes TSX were slower (2,900fps) for two reasons, A. The bullet material and design creates more friction in the barrel and jacks up pressures. B. The longer bullet length took up some powder room.

    I will try to obtain some of the 200 Gr Accubonds. I'll bet that I can get them up to 3,000 fps. At that velocity and with a BC of .365, the bullet will stay within 5 inches (a hand span) either side of the bore line, all the way out to 350 yards, when the rifle is zeroed at 290 yards. It will also hold over 2,000 fps all the way out to 425 yards. Well past ethical hunting distance. Of course I am already loading the 225 grain Nosler partition which has a BC of .430 even though it has a flat base, up to 2,800 fps and it is within an inch of the 200 grain boat-tail all the way out to 350 yards......

    The 200 grain Accubond might also be the Cat's Pajamas in the 358 Winchester case. A great yet recently over-looked cartridge.
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