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Thread: Denali South Side open for riding

  1. #1
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    Default Denali South Side open for riding

    All Southern Portions of 1980 Park Additions to Denali N.P. & Preserve Open to Snowmobiling for Traditional Activities
    DENALI PARK, Alaska: The Superintendent of Denali National Park and Preserve has determined that there is adequate snow cover for the use of snowmobiles for traditional activities in areas of the 1980 park additions that are south of the crest of the Alaska Range.
    All areas of the 1980 park additions north of the crest of the Alaska Range remain closed to snowmobile use for traditional activities due to inadequate snow cover.

    Riders are reminded that all lands within the former Mount McKinley National Park on both the north and the south sides of the Alaska Range are closed to all snowmobile use by federal regulation. Maps with GPS coordinates for the park and preserve boundary are available on the park website at
    www.nps.gov/dena/parkmgmt/park-boundary-info.htm.

    Overall, riding conditions are variable. It is the rider’s responsibility to avoid locations where damage to vegetation or soils could occur, or where vegetation is taller than the protective snow cover.
    Riding conditions are potentially very dangerous due to recent snowfall and high winds. There are many areas of thin ice or open water and avalanche hazard could be high due to wind crusts and layers in the snow pack. It is important to avoid steep slopes, narrow valleys, and ravines.

    Winter weather in the Alaska Range can change very quickly and become severe, with high winds and temperatures well below zero. Park rangers stress the importance of bringing survival gear on all trips into the backcountry and informing friends or relatives of your travel plans. Remember to assess local conditions before venturing into the backcountry.

    Snowmobile operators must be at least 16 years of age unless accompanied and supervised by a responsible person 21 years of age or older. Riders must report accidents resulting in injury to or death of a person, or property damage, to park rangers by the quickest means. Regulations and more information regarding snowmobiling in Denali National Park and Preserve is available on the web at
    www.nps.gov/dena/planyourvisit/snowmobiling.htm.
    The Murie Science and Learning Center is open daily from 9:00 am – 4:00 pm as the winter visitor center, providing visitor information and backcountry permits. Additional information is available on the park website at www.nps.gov/dena or by calling (907) 683-9532 between 9:00 am – 4:00 pm daily.

    Stay connected with "DenaliNPS" on Twitter, Facebook, YouTube, Flickr, and iTunes – links to these social media sites are available at www.nps.gov/dena.


  2. #2
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    Default Traditional Use?

    Quote Originally Posted by toofewweekends View Post
    All Southern Portions of 1980 Park Additions to Denali N.P. & Preserve Open to Snowmobiling for Traditional Activities
    DENALI PARK, Alaska: The Superintendent of Denali National Park and Preserve has determined that there is adequate snow cover for the use of snowmobiles for traditional activities in areas of the 1980 park additions that are south of the crest of the Alaska Range.
    All areas of the 1980 park additions north of the crest of the Alaska Range remain closed to snowmobile use for traditional activities due to inadequate snow cover.

    Riders are reminded that all lands within the former Mount McKinley National Park on both the north and the south sides of the Alaska Range are closed to all snowmobile use by federal regulation. Maps with GPS coordinates for the park and preserve boundary are available on the park website at
    www.nps.gov/dena/parkmgmt/park-boundary-info.htm.

    Overall, riding conditions are variable. It is the rider’s responsibility to avoid locations where damage to vegetation or soils could occur, or where vegetation is taller than the protective snow cover.
    Riding conditions are potentially very dangerous due to recent snowfall and high winds. There are many areas of thin ice or open water and avalanche hazard could be high due to wind crusts and layers in the snow pack. It is important to avoid steep slopes, narrow valleys, and ravines.

    Winter weather in the Alaska Range can change very quickly and become severe, with high winds and temperatures well below zero. Park rangers stress the importance of bringing survival gear on all trips into the backcountry and informing friends or relatives of your travel plans. Remember to assess local conditions before venturing into the backcountry.

    Snowmobile operators must be at least 16 years of age unless accompanied and supervised by a responsible person 21 years of age or older. Riders must report accidents resulting in injury to or death of a person, or property damage, to park rangers by the quickest means. Regulations and more information regarding snowmobiling in Denali National Park and Preserve is available on the web at
    www.nps.gov/dena/planyourvisit/snowmobiling.htm.
    The Murie Science and Learning Center is open daily from 9:00 am – 4:00 pm as the winter visitor center, providing visitor information and backcountry permits. Additional information is available on the park website at www.nps.gov/dena or by calling (907) 683-9532 between 9:00 am – 4:00 pm daily.

    Stay connected with "DenaliNPS" on Twitter, Facebook, YouTube, Flickr, and iTunes – links to these social media sites are available at www.nps.gov/dena.


    Bringing this back to the top because I have a question. Saturday we were tooling around north of our cabin in the Petersville area. We got much further north than we had in the past and after returning and looking at a map, we realized we had gone into Denali NP. Currently the south side is open to snowmachines for traditional activities.

    So, my question is, what does the park service currently think traditional activities in Denali NP, outside of the Old Park, are? I did some searching and came up with the issues associated with banning snowmachines from the original park, but it doesn't appear that they ever settled on a definition for the other areas of the park. I found a 2013 document on a study the NPS did for Kenai Fjords NP and traditional use of snowmachines but that was particular to that park and Exit Glacier.

    Since, we aren't allowed to hunt in Denali NP, if stopped, I was going to say we were exploring. To me, mankind has been exploring the earth using whatever transportation method was available and suited to the conditions pretty much from the getgo and exploring is a traditional activity.

  3. #3

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    Rick, as a part of the last two lawsuits concerning the park services and snowmobiling, the best answer I can give you is that the Park Service maintains that "whatever the superintendent says is traditional, is traditional. Whatever he says is non-traditional, regardless of how long the activity has been occurring, is non-traditional". Two court decisions have found in the access advocates favor, and each time the superintendent changes the closure verbiage and shuts down access again...In the words of one of the superintendents involved, "This is my decision, if you don't like it, sue me...again".
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    I was afraid it was something nebulous like that. Maybe I will continue to ride where I believe I have the legal right, and if they don’t like it they can “catch me if they can.”

  5. #5
    Member Erik in AK's Avatar
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    Don't sweat it Rick. Parkies can't ride.
    If cave men had been trophy hunters the Wooly Mammoth would be alive today

  6. #6
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    Traditions change....
    Tim

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