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Thread: BLR accuracy

  1. #1
    Member c04hoosier's Avatar
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    Default BLR accuracy

    What sort of accuracy can one expect from a BLR? Obviously it varies from rifle to rifle and whatnot, but on average? Are we talking MOA, 1.5 MOA, etc?

    Also, how are the triggers on them? Weight? Creep?

    Just curious to hear some experiences from you BLR owners out there. Thanks.

    c04hoosier

  2. #2
    Member mainer_in_ak's Avatar
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    well under one inch groups with a 1.75-5 power scope. that is my experience. Dang good gun, flawless function for me, but other's have voiced concern of the rack and pinion gearing.

  3. #3
    Member c04hoosier's Avatar
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    What is the concern with the rack and pinion gearing? I haven't heard much one way or another but I'm interested in them.

  4. #4
    Member mainer_in_ak's Avatar
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    with the hinged exposed hammer, this in one of the only guns that I would feel safe carrying with a loaded chamber. No internal spring under tension only stopped by a safety that could fail. With the hammer hinged forward and sitting under a scope, there is no way you are going to cock it back unless you deliberately pulled it back.

    Don't take the gun apart, as the rack and pinion gearing won't go back together easily, this is the biggest problem and I've seen where folks have tried to take em apart, and that would probably explain why bubba gunsmith's rifle doesn't work right.....because it's been messed with.

    The BLR has always been my favorite hunting rifle. Fast follow up shots, avail in a bunch of different configurations and chamberings, accurate as most bolt rifles, and very smooth operation. They are very lightweight, so be ready for some healthy recoil.

  5. #5
    Member 1Cor15:19's Avatar
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    Just like to add to what mainer has already said. Accuracy from my rifle (.358 Winchester) has been very good. I've several loads that have produced outstanding results and the rifle is not at all picky. Without going to my records I can't say for certain, but I don't recall a single load that hasn't produced better than 2 inch groups at a 100 yards, this with a M8 3X. My normal deer load is a 200 grain Hornady at 2500+ fps and it regularly produces groups half that size.

    As for disassembly, it is a fairly complicated action with very specific issues with the gear timing. I disassembled my BLR last spring and finally got it back together, but did not have a set of headspace gauges and was not comfortable with my finished product. Living at least one flight and several hundred miles from a gunsmith is very inconvenient, but taking it to a smith seemed a prudent action. The Kid had it back together in no time and I realized that I had reassembled it properly. Still its no cakewalk and certainly a consideration for a rifle that will see hard use in the field.

    The lightweight is what drew me to the rifle and I love the way it carries and handles. I've killed seven deer with this rifle and all but one were DRT. The lone deer received a first shot and then a second shot on the run faster than you can read this. It cycles quickly and naturally; ideal for follow-up shots. If it were easier to strip I'd carry it more. For me it is a rifle that I can carry on 1-3 day hunts; it is not suited for a two week jaunt in the wilds of Alaska IMO.
    Foolishness is a moral category, not an intellectual one.

  6. #6
    Member c04hoosier's Avatar
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    Thanks for the feedback. Honestly that doesn't seem like a huge issue considering what I have in mind for the rifle, should I buy one. It will basically be a relatively fair weather deer (and possibly pronghorn) gun for here in Colorado. It likely would never see Alaska or any serious wilderness hunts here in CO. I have other guns for those hunts. It would basically be a weekend outing type rifle.

    I am considering picking up a used one in .257 Roberts. I've seen a few on Gunbroker. I didn't realize the BLR was ever made in .257 Roberts until I was searching Gunbroker by that caliber. I'm somewhat intrigued by the possibility of a lever action .257. Call me crazy...

  7. #7
    Sponsor ADfields's Avatar
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    I have 2, both older models and both 308. They will do MOA or better with ammo they like. Yea they are very hard to brake down but it can be learned if needed. Triggers are what they are, functional, not good not bad but you can learn to shoot it. The old ones (with the flatter receiver top) are all slick and well made. Some of the new ones (more rounded top) feel like they are full of sand but I handled 6 brand new at GNG this week that were all just as slick and well fitted as the old ones. Old ones come in short (308 length) action only, new ones come in short and long action and both are available in a take-down also.
     
    With high pressure rounds like 308 Iíve found the chamber needs to be polished or it will give hard/sticky extraction. This is because there is a lot going on in that first ĹĒ of lever swing, the bolt is turning the lugs in the spiral cuts making friction, the lugs are turning in the breach making friction, the extractor is trying to brake the spent case free making even more friction. I no nothing about 257 Roberts but if itís in the 60Kpsi range like 308 you may need to polish the chamber.
     
    They say the gearing will jam with sand but Iím from Arizona and have had one full of sand and it just ground it up like a coffee grinder. Not a very nice thing to do to any gun but she functioned just fine full of Arizona dry wash quarts sand so donít buy the myth. I think the myth started from the sticky case thing I described but a simple chamber polish fixes that. All and all a very good rifle that Iíd take anyplace any time, I almost bought a 358 I had in my hands at GNG Monday but this time of year I get in trouble if I buy something for me.
    Andy
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  8. #8

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    I'm very happy with my BLR in 358Win. It shoots the Win factory, bleh, into sub-2 MOA at 100yds. I have much better luck with handloads but not easily. I have worked thru 6 different bullet/powder combos and have found one decent and one good load. I am by no means finished and know that I can get better results. My hunting load now prints 225gr SGKs into .75-1.0" consistently at 2430fps.

    As stated the BLR carries and shoulders with ease. The action cycles very quick and natural to the feel. I have fired a long-action model and felt that the short-action models have a much better lever throw. It felt like I had to think more cycling the long-action model. The trigger has creep and is a bit heavy for me. When shooting groups at the range and rotating rifles for barrel cooling purposes, I have to really clear my head and focus on the BLR trigger pull. All my other rifles have lighter and crisper triggers and the difference is very noticeable. It isn't horrible, just your standard OEM lawyer-driven trigger.

    A BLR in 257Bob sounds like a dream. My only concern would be magazine length limiting OAL if you handload. The Bob really shines once you're able to maximize OAL and get into +p territory. Good Luck and let us know how it works out.

  9. #9
    Member akgun&ammo's Avatar
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    I have had several BLR's in multiple calibers. The older steel frame "seems" to handle a little better weight wise for shouldering. My last BLR was a 300 WSM takedown in the lightweight with Fancy wood. The older steel frame in 308 would group just about anything into 1 1/2" groups at 100 yards. The 300 WSM using the trophy bonded bearclaw load at 2950 fps gave me one group of five into .390 inches at 100 meters, (on Military range). It usually grouped hunting loads into less than one inch all day long. Harvested two moose with it, both one shot kills. Overall, I would expect at least 1 1/2 inch groups with any of the BLR's. Some will be better however!

    Chris

  10. #10

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    How do the 200gr spire points work on deer and do they regularly exit? I have shot one buck with them at 60 yards and there was NO EXIT, I did not find the bullet either (2480fps). I am guessing it made it forward to the shoulder where it was hard to see since I only cut up to the bottom of the ribs. It went 30 yards and dropped. Used a Hawk 225gr .030" (2340fps) RT this year worked spectacular!

  11. #11
    Member alaska bush man's Avatar
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    The older Steel frame models in 243, 308 and 358 Win were excellent. The 243/308 Belgium Made ones would make a nice addition to the Safe! Good loads you can expect 1 1/2" or less at 100 yards.
    Alaska

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