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Thread: Laker fishing strategy?

  1. #1
    Member pike_palace's Avatar
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    Default Laker fishing strategy?

    I have never fished Lakers before, but I'm starting to get the itch to do so. From what I've read it's pretty painfully slow for the most part and requires a lot of patience (not a problem). What is a suggested depth or water column area to fish? Are they mainly bottom huggers like most trout or do they suspend much? Seeing as most Lake Trout lakes are quite big, I could see where a flasher would be an excellent tool. Also, is better to move around alot and fish a spot 15 -30 min and move, or sit in a likely spot and hope one comes by?

    Won't have much time to fish lakers this winter but I think I'll give it a crack a few times if possible. Thanks for any advice.
    "Ya can't stop a bad guy with a middle finger and a bag of quarters!!!!"- Ted Nugent.

  2. #2
    Member DRIFTER_016's Avatar
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    Lakers are constantly on the move and can be found anywhere in the water column at any time during the winter.
    I have caught them in 10 fow all the way down to 120 fow (haven't tried any deeper than that).
    I generally like to start by fishing points that drop off quickly into deep water.
    Under water humps can be another effective place to start.
    I have also fished drop offs by off shore islands with good success.

    I tend to start drilling @ about 40 fow and will punch several holes shallower and several deeper and work all the holes over the course of an hour or two. If I have limited or no action it's time to move and do it all over again.

    Don't overlook deep flats as well as they can be found there at times too.

  3. #3

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    Quote Originally Posted by DRIFTER_016 View Post
    Lakers are constantly on the move and can be found anywhere in the water column at any time during the winter.
    I have caught them in 10 fow all the way down to 120 fow (haven't tried any deeper than that).
    I generally like to start by fishing points that drop off quickly into deep water.
    Under water humps can be another effective place to start.
    I have also fished drop offs by off shore islands with good success.

    I tend to start drilling @ about 40 fow and will punch several holes shallower and several deeper and work all the holes over the course of an hour or two. If I have limited or no action it's time to move and do it all over again.

    Don't overlook deep flats as well as they can be found there at times too.
    Oh great Drifter in so many words you tell him if theres water there could be fish.

  4. #4
    Member Rising_Creek's Avatar
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    I was thinking the same thing. When I read that. Very funny.

    What bait / lure works? What pound test?
    Quote Originally Posted by akdube View Post
    Oh great Drifter in so many words you tell him if theres water there could be fish.

  5. #5
    Member Dirtofak's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by akdube View Post
    Oh great Drifter in so many words you tell him if theres water there could be fish.
    Well..... according to where you set up....... that is a true statement.

  6. #6
    Member gutleap's Avatar
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    The lake trout is an elusive fish, teasing the skills of even the most accomplished angler. Now that the lakes have inverted and an oxygen rich environment is all throughout the water column, you will find them just about at any depth this time of year. They roam over a wide area in search of food. It is not uncommon to see them in groups of 3-4 at a time. A flasher helps in identifying depth, baitfish and target fish. When fishing a lake for the first time, try to get a bathymetric map of the lake in order to pinpoint bottom structure and areas that could possibly funnel fish through them. Then you have to drill baby, drill. I drilled holes once on Paxson lake every 100 feet or so across the entire width of that lake looking for the bottom structure. If there were no baitfish or target fish as indicated on the flasher, I moved on and drilled another hole.

    Lake trout this time of year feed on crustaceans, (snails) plankton and baitfish. So, with that in mind, if you can find areas of the lake that have snails on the bottom and baitfish that are suspended, the lakers will be there as well. As for lures, find out what the baitfish are in the particular lake you are fishing and try to mimic that. Each lake is different. You are dead on as far as patience goes. I gotta warn you though, once you hook into one of these beasts, you will become addicted.

  7. #7
    Member pike_palace's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by gutleap View Post
    The lake trout is an elusive fish, teasing the skills of even the most accomplished angler. Now that the lakes have inverted and an oxygen rich environment is all throughout the water column, you will find them just about at any depth this time of year. They roam over a wide area in search of food. It is not uncommon to see them in groups of 3-4 at a time. A flasher helps in identifying depth, baitfish and target fish. When fishing a lake for the first time, try to get a bathymetric map of the lake in order to pinpoint bottom structure and areas that could possibly funnel fish through them. Then you have to drill baby, drill. I drilled holes once on Paxson lake every 100 feet or so across the entire width of that lake looking for the bottom structure. If there were no baitfish or target fish as indicated on the flasher, I moved on and drilled another hole.

    Lake trout this time of year feed on crustaceans, (snails) plankton and baitfish. So, with that in mind, if you can find areas of the lake that have snails on the bottom and baitfish that are suspended, the lakers will be there as well. As for lures, find out what the baitfish are in the particular lake you are fishing and try to mimic that. Each lake is different. You are dead on as far as patience goes. I gotta warn you though, once you hook into one of these beasts, you will become addicted.
    Cool. I appreciate this. Maybe I'll get lucky and tie into a slob trout this year!
    "Ya can't stop a bad guy with a middle finger and a bag of quarters!!!!"- Ted Nugent.

  8. #8
    Member Dirtofak's Avatar
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    Big fish sit in water with decent oxygen and security, then run to where the baitfish are when they are hungry. You can sit on them while they are processing their last meal. You can try to intercept them on their way to the feeding grounds. You can try to catch them where the baitfish are. Prepare to spend hours drilling holes.

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