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Thread: 2 hunters shooting same rifle/ and muzzle break question....

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    Member kahahawai's Avatar
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    Default 2 hunters shooting same rifle/ and muzzle break question....

    I've been contemplating taking my wife out hunting and I thought it would be a great advantage to just tote one rifle. My question is: I know we both have to shoot and get sighted in, but what are the disadvantages of it from your experiences? will there be a variance in grouping our shots? Just trying to cut down the weight factor....

    Another question: I have never hunted with a muzzle break, but getting one put on( so wife can shoot and limit the recoil) , do you guys still use electrical tape over muzzle breaks? I know they make a cover that you can take off fairly quick but don't know the name... or should I usa a balloon?

  2. #2

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    My wife and I swap rifles all the time without concern, but I won't speak for everyone else. Only thing I notice, they seem to hit better in her hands!

    I have several guns with brakes, and it's not an issue with the second person behind. If side-by-side for whatever reason, covering the ears for a shot is mandatory.

    And yup, electrical tape is king.

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    Moderator stid2677's Avatar
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    When I sight in my wife's rifle for her, I do have to adjust it to her eye, as we have a different POI by about 2 inches. For us we both prefer to have a weapon while in the bush. She takes her rifle for trips to answer natures call and I some times will hunt early while she sleeps in and she likes having her rifle in the tent with her. Far too many things on a remote hunt that can cause a rifle to fail, rifles, stoves are a few of the things I like having a backup for. My wife weighs about 100lbs and has no problem shooting her 270WSM, with it ported. JMHO, but I prefer porting to brakes.

    For a ported barrel I just tape it up and the tape blows off when fired. Also while certainly louder than a non-ported rifle, porting is far less loud than a rifle with a brake.

    Bravo, for getting your wife out hunting, best thing I ever did was get my wife interested in hunting. She proudly shows off her bears in her office and often receives comments about them. It does cost more in gear and transporter fees, but well worth the added cost.

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    Moderator LuJon's Avatar
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    I ended up sharing a rifle with a buddy on Kodiak after my sights became suspect. Decision was last second and the first shot I ever fired out of that gun. Aim was dead on and the longest shot I have attempted ~300yds. The rifle killed 2 goats in 2 shots about 4 hours apart with 2 different shooters and his shot was longer than mine. No problem there at all, just place the crosshairs and squeeze.

    I believe he just e-taped his brake and the biggest thing I would recommend is be wary of ear protection for both of you, as well as her position in relation to the barrel when you fire. The noise travels laterally from the muzzle much more and I was glued to the binos about 15' to the side of my buddy when he shot. My ears were ringing big time!

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    Moderator Daveinthebush's Avatar
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    My son and I have tried this and it is a no go. I am left handed, he, right. At 100 yards we ar talking about 4-5" L-R difference. No one can shoot my bow either.

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    I will say it again get a wild west brake! I have 375 ultra mag and I have shot it next to people with no complaints and none from me!

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    Me and my hunting partner share rifles quite often, it is a good tactic out here. One will carry the best gun (that either of us may own) for the hunt and the other will carry an 1895 45-70 for them darn bars. It takes a bit of forward planning and range time and even purchase planning, but is actually economical in the long run.
    Best thing you can do if you are sharing a gun is spend on a good scope with target turrets. That way you can record and change the POI for each shooter using the target turrets in the field. Again just a good bit of range time and recording of information. Primary shot has the 'zero setting' and secondary shot has recorded adjustments off zero.
    As for brakes and noise, they have never really bothered me, but 20years with BIG GUNS and missiles my ears are already FUBAR. I am not a fan of any form of ear protection when hunting, too much else going on. But if you are to use any then the little surefire ones that go in the ear, stay in tight and allow you to still hear each other are good. I use em at the range and hardly notice they are there.
    http://www.amazon.com/SureFire-Signa...3109692&sr=8-4
    Walmart sells little 'Rubbers' for muzzles, pack of 50 is a couple of bucks, I prefer these as I just hate Electrical tape gunk when it gets wet and or brittle.

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    Functionally, I don't see that there would be any significant issues as long as both of you know how it is sighted and adjust accordingly. Personally, I wouldn't want to go that way for the same reason others have mentioned. It doesn't take much to make a rifle unusable for whatever reason (scope knocked on tree/rock/pack/boat/etc..., dumped into the water/marsh, etc...). Having the rifle from a 2nd hunter means you can keep hunting instead of packing up to head home. The other thing is that you lose the ability of having a backup shooter. I know we have had instances where an animal was wounded and we had to split up to track it down. Doesn't work too well if you only have a single rifle with you.

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    Member fnsakdel's Avatar
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    If your not in a hurry I have a couple of these on 2 different rifles and will stand by what he says on his site about recoil and noise. They are not any louder than with out and the recoil is much better and it take all the muzle flip out. Biggest problem I see is he redeployed and will not be back till march of 2012.
    http://www.bp-tec.com/index.html
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    Owner of Kenai Keeper www.kenaikeeper.com

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    Member hodgeman's Avatar
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    I've swapped/shared rifles without an issue or discernable change in POI....I think the culprit will be stock fit if there is a shift and you may not be able to do much to mitigate it. Possibly shoot a shorter stock or have your wife use a cheekpad to raise her sight line to match yours. Some range time would probably answer a lot of those questions.

    As bad as I hate brakes. if it meant my wife would hunt more, I'd suffer through but I'd just tape it up to keep out the debris.

    Lot of interesting commentary here about taking alternate weapons or just two rifles...but when you're counting the grams a 7.5 lb reduction just sounds exceptionally tempting. I assume we're talking backpack or drop hunts where weight is a factor?

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    Going into the field with two people and one rifle for huntung is not a choice I would make. Having a muzzle break on a rifle is another choice I would not make, I absolutely loathe the things. If I were to alter a rifle for the sake of recoil reduction for the Mrs. I would opt for MagNa-Port and a quality recoil pad. I once fired a .338WM which was MagNa-ported and was impressed by the reduction in felt recoil and the fact that the rifle seemed no louder to the shooter or the bystander when fired. The owner of the rifle told me that MagNa-Port claimed the recoil reduction was that similar to a .243Win, I do not recall it being quite that light, however, a somewhat diminutive lady who was with us fired the rifle easily and without complaint.

  12. #12

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    A slip on a slick slope could end your hunting experience if you only carry one rifle between the two of you hunters. As far as a brake on a rifle; heck I'ld paint my circassian walnut Kimber stock pink if it would get my wife into the field, so a brake would be a moot point as long as it let the wife enjoy shooting and the field. Just Mag-Na-Port hers and put a brake on yours, or brake both rifles and get the thread cover that allows the removal on demand, and covers the brake threads. OR Mag-Na-Port both rifles, it's worth for the field time with loved ones. IF you don't feel like carrying it just leave the second rifle in camp as a back-up.
    " Americans will never need the 2nd Amendment, until the government tries to take it away."

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    Moderator stid2677's Avatar
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    A gentleman would carry a ladies rifle for her, at least her load would be 7lbs lighter.

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  14. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by stid2677 View Post
    A gentleman would carry a ladies rifle for her, at least her load would be 7lbs lighter.


    Man I thought since you carried such junky equipment, you just carried a spare rifle. LOL
    " Americans will never need the 2nd Amendment, until the government tries to take it away."

    On the road of life..... Pot holes keep things interesting !

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    Moderator LuJon's Avatar
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    Is this you carrying Luke's rifle on Kodiak?

    Quote Originally Posted by stid2677 View Post
    A gentleman would carry a ladies rifle for her, at least her load would be 7lbs lighter.


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    Member alaskabliss's Avatar
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    For me the choice to get my wife her own rifle was the only choice. She was so proud the day we bought it. She helped me develop a load for it and sight it in. It helped make her feel like she was helping and part of the work. It also made her understand her rifle and the loads better too. When she shot her caribou this year, her rifle was the only one you could see out of due to the rain. My scope would not clear up. She was able to make a 200yd shot and kill her first animal. If we only had mine we may have been looking another day. Carrying our own guns also gave me the ability if needed to do a follow up shot if her's was botched. And when she walked back to the rig about a half mile she had something to defend herself with in the heavy bear country we were in while I was making sure her animal was down for good.
    Lots of reasons to carry your own rifles. I had a stock get broken on the start of a big hunt one year and thank goodness we had another rifle. It sucked having to use the same one. Good luck to ya and enjoy hunting with the best hunting partner ever... Unless you have to pack it far!!!

  17. #17
    Moderator LuJon's Avatar
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    My wife carries a Ruger compact 308 that tips the scale at almost exactly 7lbs scoped. It is wood and blued and still very light by most standards! She hasn't been sheep hunting but doesn't complain carrying it looking for moose.

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    My wife and I have shared rifles on a few trips. Works out well. Helps when "her" rifle is the one I grew up shooting with just a touch shorter LOP now. Though for caribou, moose, and bear I am hoping that our rifle weights combined will be around 11 pounds now which isn't much more than what my Ruger M77 weighed all up.

    I usually end up carrying both rifles when my wife and I go hunting as well. Atleast when were are getting to our camping destination. When actually hunting out of our spike camp then she carries it. Being able to hunt with a single 6.2 pound rifle certainly does have its appeal. However, my wife likes the idea of me there backing her up with her own rifle if need be. Not that she needs it from what I have seen.

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    Member Smokey's Avatar
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    I might rec having the scope mounted in low rings if your setting up one gun for two shooters, as a womans face is usually much smaller than a mans and if you gave her say your gun with med to high mounts she likely would not get the proper "full " site picture needed to make the same shot as you.
    Range time will tell the tale though.
    Man, I hear Steve falls down a lot also - no way is he cart'en my gun around!
    When asked what state I live in I say "The State of Confusion", better known as IL....

  20. #20

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    Quote Originally Posted by brav01 View Post
    A slip on a slick slope could end your hunting experience if you only carry one rifle between the two of you hunters.
    With this logic the same could be said when going solo. Wouldn't catch me hauling two rifles on a solo endeavor. I do hear what you are saying though, but at some point you just gotta trust your gear/guns/and gut.

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