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Thread: Found a .375 Whelen 40 deg deg today

  1. #1
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    Default Found a .375 Whelen 40 deg deg today

    I'm visiting my daughter in Denver for a few days and decided to go to a gunshow there this weekend. It was just up the road so I figured what the heck.

    Lots of neat stuff and friendly folks- probably the best big gun show I've been to in many years.

    I found a table where the vendor was selling some rifles for a friend that had died in Juneau. He had several temping rifles but one that caught my eye for the price was a .375 Whelen 40 deg. It was built on a FN Supreme action and was in a nice lightweight fiberglass stock. Workmanship was first class - the gunsmith did a very good job. The rifle came with the dies and some ammo - the dies themselves aren't cheap.

    Now I've got to get it back to AK and load some ammo. If it shoots well it could become one of my favorite rifles - it is considerably lighter than my .375 H&H but should still have plenty of power for anything I run into.

    Two questions: 1) Anybody have any experience with this cartridge and 2) does anyone know who makes the stock with EATON on the butt plate?

    Thanks in advance!
    Tom
    Living the urban lifestyle so I can pay my way and for my family's needs, and support my country. And you?
    ".. ask not what your country can do for you, ask what you can do for your country" JFK

  2. #2
    Supporting Member iofthetaiga's Avatar
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    I think you might have some interesting and challenging research ahead. Sounds like a nice gun. Is the butt plate original to the stock/rifle? (This is just a best guess, I have no direct experience with Eaton's): T.Eaton & Co. was at one time the largest department store retailer in Canada. They manufactured ammunition, firearms and lots of other stuff under contract for other companies, especially during the war effort. They sold stuff under their name and others, were distributors for Savage etc. Company went bankrupt in '99 and remaining stores were sold to Sears. There is lots of company info and records available on microfiche in Canada, but not a lot online.
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  3. #3

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    Case forming can be a bit of a challenge. A bud located some "06 basic" brass that was straight wall all the way- not necked at all. That was fine and easy. Best way I've found when reforming from 06 is to seat the bullet right into the lands with a moderate charge so you get a "final" form on firing. I made final parenthetic because you don't always get a full shoulder form on first firing. If that happens your cases were too hard after neck expanding and should have been annealed before firing. Annealing after first fire forming will sometimes go ahead and fill in the shoulder on subsequent firing with full power loads, sometimes not. Best overall routine I've found is to start with 35 Whelen cases, anneal after neck sizing, fire form with bullet in lands, then anneal again. Second annealing isn't really necessary, but lets you go about 8 shots before having to do it again, rather than 3-4.

  4. #4
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    Thanks for the advice - looking at the cases and ammo I got with the gun I can imagine the difficulties. I have .35 Welen dies and plenty of '06 cases so that will help.

    The gun and dies do not apper to be used much at all- maybe fired a box or two if that much. I will see how the gun works out for me.

    Quote Originally Posted by BrownBear View Post
    Case forming can be a bit of a challenge. A bud located some "06 basic" brass that was straight wall all the way- not necked at all. That was fine and easy. Best way I've found when reforming from 06 is to seat the bullet right into the lands with a moderate charge so you get a "final" form on firing. I made final parenthetic because you don't always get a full shoulder form on first firing. If that happens your cases were too hard after neck expanding and should have been annealed before firing. Annealing after first fire forming will sometimes go ahead and fill in the shoulder on subsequent firing with full power loads, sometimes not. Best overall routine I've found is to start with 35 Whelen cases, anneal after neck sizing, fire form with bullet in lands, then anneal again. Second annealing isn't really necessary, but lets you go about 8 shots before having to do it again, rather than 3-4.
    Living the urban lifestyle so I can pay my way and for my family's needs, and support my country. And you?
    ".. ask not what your country can do for you, ask what you can do for your country" JFK

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