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Thread: fly line?

  1. #1

    Default fly line?

    go to get a new fly line for cold water for my trip. Any brand would you recommend? Floater or sink tip. It gonna be on my 8 wt for Solmon

  2. #2
    Member Raptor_1's Avatar
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    Rio makes awesome stuff. All I use.
    Alaska: We're all here cuz we're not all "there"

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    Member bigcox's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Raptor_1 View Post
    Rio makes awesome stuff. All I use.
    What he said..
    You know your not catching any fish when you start talking about the weather...


    http://www.alaskansalmonslayers.com/

  4. #4

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    sink tip or floater
    ?

  5. #5
    Member AlaskaHippie's Avatar
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    I run a floater, tho' some prefer sink.

    If you have a spare spool for your salmon reel, bring both...If not, floating line with a (removable) sink tip leader will cover your bases.

    And as others have said, RIO has sufficed quite nicely for my needs.
    “Life has become immeasurably better since I have been forced to stop taking it seriously.” ― H.S.T.
    "Character is how you treat those who can do nothing for you."

  6. #6
    Member Raptor_1's Avatar
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    I find that a sink tip is a lot better than floating for reds when "flossing" them although this is not what I'd call fishing, rather filling the freezer. Other than that it all depends on the water you're fishing. 95% of the fishing I've run into up here, a floating line is all you need. It is wise though to have a spare spool rigged with sink tip or a floater with a removable sink tip like hippie suggested in case you run into deep or fast water or a combination of the two. I use a sink tip when swinging big streamers for salmon. When fishing for trout, to get deep most of the time all you have to do is add some shot and/or weighted flies. One situation where I wish I had a sink tip was the outlet of Skilak this fall. Water was very high and we had to use 20' leaders and some heavy shot to get down to the fish.
    Alaska: We're all here cuz we're not all "there"

  7. #7
    Member 6XLeech's Avatar
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    Plenty of good choices. I have favored fly lines by Rio, but many others are offered at area shops. In fact, another approach to consider... call local fly shops in the area you plan to fish. They'll have recs based on your plans and price range. And... perhaps more. I suspect the differences between one fly line versus another will be small, but the comments you get from one fly shop owner on a day when he has a little time to chat... who knows?
    Good luck.

  8. #8
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    Rio, Rio, Rio!!!

  9. #9

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    i guess rio it is.

  10. #10

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    Instead of buying two spools of line, get a floating line and some T-8 to T-15 to make removable sink tips for your line, save time and money. And I too am a fan of Rio.

  11. #11
    Member G_Smolt's Avatar
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    I used to be a fan of Rio lines, but I have never had one last a full season without having some sort of issues - broken cores, bad loop welds, slipped coatings. If this had happened only once or twice, I might have overlooked it, but I returned no fewer than 12 Rio lines (mostly Rio Grande, but 2 OutBounds, a Trout, and an LT) for severe damage before I switched (permanently) to AirFlo.

    IMO, the AirFlo Delta is the best all-around taper for AK, with the Tactical coming a close second. After a few years of beating the bejeezus out of 7 of these lines, I have yet to have an issue with them.

  12. #12

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    landed 4 bass this am small but cute guys on 4 wt/ It was pain in the ass since couldnt cast with right hand after elbow surgery 4 days ago but it felt good to get out . Can you post picture her directly frm your hard drive?

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    Another vote for Rio. WF floating good for almost everything. Last year bought a sharkskin for my 6 wt, which casts great but I can't stand the noise when casting.

  14. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by G_Smolt View Post
    I used to be a fan of Rio lines, but I have never had one last a full season without having some sort of issues - broken cores, bad loop welds, slipped coatings. If this had happened only once or twice, I might have overlooked it, but I returned no fewer than 12 Rio lines (mostly Rio Grande, but 2 OutBounds, a Trout, and an LT) for severe damage before I switched (permanently) to AirFlo.

    IMO, the AirFlo Delta is the best all-around taper for AK, with the Tactical coming a close second. After a few years of beating the bejeezus out of 7 of these lines, I have yet to have an issue with them.
    is airflo delta intemidiate? By the way I like the blog.
    Well doc told me 4 weeks out of work so I'm going back to the lake to practice my left hand casting.

  15. #15
    Member G_Smolt's Avatar
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    AirFlo Delta tapers come in Full-float, slow intermediate (.5"/sec), and fast intermediate (1.5"/sec).

    Thanks.

  16. #16
    Member kenaibow fan's Avatar
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    G Smolt what kind of AirFlo do you use? I just went and looked them up, never heard of it but you got me interested.
    I like a floating line, with that being said how do you feel about shark skin and how do they compare?

  17. #17
    Member G_Smolt's Avatar
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    For AirFlo lines, I have the Nymph taper in 7 and 8wt, the Striper taper in 8wt, the Technical (Delta) taper in 5/6, 6/7, and 7/8wt, and the the Tactical taper in 5wt (as well as about 30 AirFlo spey lines but that is another post).

    Sharkskin and Ridgeline are both pretty much the same concept (Although AirFlo came out with Ridgeline first) - The texture of the flyline minimizes contact surface area with the rod-guides, allowing for less friction and longer casting capability...does it work? To some extent it does, and if that is the only benefit that you are after then the harder, less-pliable coating of the Sharkskin line is better suited to maximize distance.

    If you care more about the taper design of your flyline and what it means for your presentations, then the Ridge Delta is by far a superior all-around line. The dual-weight designation basically means that if you are casting with the first 30' of the head, the line weight is X, and if you cast with the whole head (46') out of the guides, the line weight is X+1...hence, the 5/6, 6/7, and so on. So what does this mean?

    Well, in the age of reverse-compound tapers (think Rio Grande, or the Clouser line), this means that the Delta taper is one of the only lines in which a heavier section of line is continuously turning over a lighter section of line, resulting in a higher level of energy retention focused into delivering your fly (bobber, splitshot, bead, whatever) where you want it to go. The reverse-compound lines are good to great overhead lines (though not for distance - they tip-dive after about 80' unless you are throwing a huge fly), but they SUCK when it comes to roll-casting, for the simple reason that you are attempting to un-stick the heaviest portion of the line (the front 15') with just the weight of the thinner rear taper.

    With the Delta, roll-casting 40' is now elementary, and distances of 60'-75' are obtainable utilizing jump-rolls and dynamic rolls.

    Check out the AirFlo stuff at www.rajeffsports.com/. Tim is the North American AirFlo rep, and as such distributes to dealers like Alaska Fly Fishing Goods and Mossy's.

  18. #18
    Member fullbush's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by G_Smolt View Post
    For AirFlo lines, I have the Nymph taper in 7 and 8wt, the Striper taper in 8wt, the Technical (Delta) taper in 5/6, 6/7, and 7/8wt, and the the Tactical taper in 5wt (as well as about 30 AirFlo spey lines but that is another post).

    Sharkskin and Ridgeline are both pretty much the same concept (Although AirFlo came out with Ridgeline first) - The texture of the flyline minimizes contact surface area with the rod-guides, allowing for less friction and longer casting capability...does it work? To some extent it does, and if that is the only benefit that you are after then the harder, less-pliable coating of the Sharkskin line is better suited to maximize distance.

    If you care more about the taper design of your flyline and what it means for your presentations, then the Ridge Delta is by far a superior all-around line. The dual-weight designation basically means that if you are casting with the first 30' of the head, the line weight is X, and if you cast with the whole head (46') out of the guides, the line weight is X+1...hence, the 5/6, 6/7, and so on. So what does this mean?

    Well, in the age of reverse-compound tapers (think Rio Grande, or the Clouser line), this means that the Delta taper is one of the only lines in which a heavier section of line is continuously turning over a lighter section of line, resulting in a higher level of energy retention focused into delivering your fly (bobber, splitshot, bead, whatever) where you want it to go. The reverse-compound lines are good to great overhead lines (though not for distance - they tip-dive after about 80' unless you are throwing a huge fly), but they SUCK when it comes to roll-casting, for the simple reason that you are attempting to un-stick the heaviest portion of the line (the front 15') with just the weight of the thinner rear taper.

    With the Delta, roll-casting 40' is now elementary, and distances of 60'-75' are obtainable utilizing jump-rolls and dynamic rolls.

    Check out the AirFlo stuff at www.rajeffsports.com/. Tim is the North American AirFlo rep, and as such distributes to dealers like Alaska Fly Fishing Goods and Mossy's.
    You guys have got me so technically freaked out I traded all my fly gear for one of these





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  19. #19
    Member kenaibow fan's Avatar
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    G Smolt,
    I guess I am a little lost....if the AirFlo has a line that turns over a lighter section cont. how is it that shark skin casts further? Or is this more cast specific? Like Roll cast or what not? Because I think it would shoot better as well? Or am I over thinking this? I have to admit, I am one that will pay top end money for a line based off hear say and not really know all the benies to the line versus anther.
    My biggest problem I have with a line is that pretty much every line fl line I have used with the exception of shark skin, it sinks after about a season or two, no matter if I wash it or wax it. Not to mention the line it self brakes down. Granted I only have a season on the shark skin but it seems to be holding up pretty nice.

    Let me ask you this, do you use a different fly line for fishing dries,nymphs and streamers? Or do you match line to the type of water your fishing? I pretty much get a fl for a 5,6 and 8 wts and run with it no matter "how" I am fishing. So I am wondering for me is it worth having a few different lines for one reel? Because to me I wouldn't think the different lines make that much difference unless using spay flies, it is mostly about the presentation and I really haven't learned if the difference in fly lines makes that much of an impact on presentation?

  20. #20
    Member G_Smolt's Avatar
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    Sharkskin is stiffer than ridgeline.
    As a general rule, stiffer lines cast further with less effort - tighter energy transfer, less wiggle = longer cast potential.

    This doesn't mean that sharkskin casts further than ridgeline - the coating of sharkskin shoots with slightly less effort than the delta clear lines.

    Lines sink for a lot of reasons, the 2 most prevalent being dirt and cracks. Sharkskin is hard to clean, and if you treat it, the treatment gets hung up in the pockets and attracts dirt...and your line sinks. Most of the Rio lines that I have owned were unintentional "sink tips" because of line cracks and weld defects...the cracks in the coating allow water to get into the core and as a result the line sinks.

    My advice to you is to go to a shop that has a wide selection of lines spooled and ready to "parking lot cast". Cast them on the rod you will be fishing, and you will soon see the difference in characteristics of various taper styles.

    I have a pile of different lines and have gone through a bunch of different brands, but the one I have stuck with is AirFlo...your results may vary.

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