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Thread: Broadheads

  1. #1
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    Default Broadheads

    My wife and son did the shooting exam this past weekend. Both shot well and I was proud. I did learn something about heads and what I thought was legal. Shuttle T's are considered barbed due to being 90 degree from the shaft, and Rage heads are legal mech heads as they due fold back to less than 90 degree if you push them backwards. I know from the history of this sight these are issues we (as hunters) go back and forth on. Just FYI for anyone who had questions on this.

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    I am a bowhunter education instructor. I will caution you that anything taught in the class as to the legality of anything is purely the opinion of the instructor and not necessarily legal or illegal. I would agree that the Shuttle T appears to be 90deg or slightly back and that would be splitting hairs if it was 90 deg. I would disagree on the Rage since the rear portion of the broadhead does not ever go forward and remains "barbed" throughout it's travel. (watch the animation on their website).

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    I was with you on this one, and yes it is open to judgement by the trooper making the call. His example (the instructor also retired trooper) was that once open if you push on the back side of the blades they fold forward to less than a 45 degree angle. My 2 cents I dont like Mech Heads. The Shuttle T caught me off guard, I shot these years ago with good results. Only went to muzzy when I could not find the replacement blades for the T's.

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    Lots of states with the barbed rule and I'm unaware of any that the Shuttle T's are illegal. They sure did a nice job on my bull this year!

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    Wouldn't it be nice if all the broadhead manufactures put a barbed or non-barbed label on there product

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    Every year we ask the is it legal or not question with broadheads. Amongs all of us hunters who have looked at the reg and looked at the equipment and we still can't agree on what is legal or not. The positive side of it is this: If you get a ticket, fight it. No jury panel in the world will be able to agree if it's barbed or not since us trained and experianced hunters can't agree either, so we get a free get out of jail pass!!!

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    I'm a bowhunting instructor also but I can't comment on AK laws.

    Just my opinion, but with whitetails I find the 2 blade cut on contact broadheads work just a well as any 3 or 4 blade fixed or mechanical and you get better penetration. The 2 blades seem to go thru the ribs easier and since I began using them again after 20 years of trying all kind of broadheads I have never had a 2 blade cut on contact stay in an animal. I have also noticed the deer do not run as far after they are hit with the 2 blade. I shot a doe a few weeks ago and she jumped a bit when the arrow hit her and then she just walked in a 10 yd circle and fell over after a double lung shot...kicked a few times and that was it. It seems the bigger broadheads have more of an impact to the animal where the 2 blade is like a bee sting.

    Just my experience and thought I'd pass it on.

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    Thought long and hard about switching to a 2-blade this year. Stayed with my Shuttle T's simply because I KNOW what is going to happen when I hit an animal. They produce a HUGE hole in the skin.

    That said, I did not pass thru my bull at 19 yards. Shattered ribs on both sides, but just couldn't get through that thick skin of a moose. 3 years ago, I had a Shuttle T deflect pretty severely on a bull elk in Oregon. I just nicked the back 1/4 of a rib and the arrow deflected almost 45 DEGREES! I attribute that more to a light carbon arrow and have since added 100 gr brass inserts. I guess that's the downside of these heads...on the other hand, I had an enormous blood trail to follow on the elk and I watched my moose expire, so....?

    Maybe I'll give a 2-blade a chance. Next up is caribou, any suggestions? Magnus, Zwickey?

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    I use magnus broadheads and have had no problems, one there made in my home state and life time warranty, shot all my deer with them and my caribou. but back to the subject that was started is its a matter of opinion on what to use but if its that questionable dont use it to save arguments with a trooper thats my opinion there are so many broadheads to choose from and from my experince in alaska if your following the rules the troopers wont dig further to find something wrong cause everyone of them could find something if they prolly wanted to.

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    I think any good quality 2 blade will do the trick. I'm using Bear Archery 125 gr 2 blade ventelated and they don't plane hardly at all and I use them in a recurve and compound with equal success. Get a pack, try them with your arrows and tune as necessary and get used to their flight pattern then go stick them in a caribou and see how they work.

    I hunt tree stand mostly and the "down thru the top" shots work great for blood trails as long as the arrow is a pass thru....otherwise you get a chest full of blood but very little trail if you need it.

    I had a spine shot with a three blade years ago that deflected into one lung and down thru the bottom of the rib cage and the broadhead made it thru the skin but the shaft did not and that deer ran forever with the arrow hanging out the bottom of his chest and no blood to speak of anywhere. I think he kept running trying to get rid of the arrow and forgot he was dead. When I pulled the arrow I think every drop of blood in that deer was in his chest and it gushed out like a fountain. He had bent the alum arrow while running and the fletchings had plugged the hole left by the 3 blade....very interesting lesson.

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    Magnus Snuffer SS all the way. More parts = more things that can go wrong.

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    I've never been disappointed with the HOWARD HILL 2-bladed broadhead. I've taken most of Alaska's big game with it, and I've never had an arrow remain in the animal. Every arrow has been through and through. They're heavy, but that only aids in penetration. More than that, you simply cannot make one windplane !!! I've used those heads since 1952, and still do. And, no - - - that's not a misprint.

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    Interesting...never thought of the Shuttle T's as barbed, never heard that one. They are a popular head and I've used them successfully, great broadheads. Rage are certainly legal, they do fold forward with no effort.

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    “Barbed” means an arrowhead with any fixed portion of the rear edge of the arrowhead forming an angle less than 90 degrees with the shaft when measured from the nock end of the arrow; that is taken directly off of page 20 of the current regs. If the back side of the blade creates LESS then a 90 degree angle to the shaft you are illegal. Shuttle T's to my knowledge create a perfect 90 which would make them legal and i would shoot them, just like slick tricks. More importantly at the end of the day the troopers are the ones that write the ticket so if you have questions call and ask a wildlife trooper. When you do call, get that persons name, date and time you contacted them, and give them your name also ask for the troopers phone number. That will hopefully cover you if the question arises.

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    The original Howar Hill broadheaads were truly barbed, and almost full length of the blades. The theory was that a protruding head, when the shot was not through-and-through, would catch on the brush and be pulled out, thus leaving a blood trail that would be easier to follow.

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    They look like they would do the deed but they certainly are in love with them. Wish I could shoot like that guy at 70 yds!!
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    Quote Originally Posted by Orelk6x6 View Post
    Thought long and hard about switching to a 2-blade this year. Stayed with my Shuttle T's simply because I KNOW what is going to happen when I hit an animal. They produce a HUGE hole in the skin.

    That said, I did not pass thru my bull at 19 yards. Shattered ribs on both sides, but just couldn't get through that thick skin of a moose. 3 years ago, I had a Shuttle T deflect pretty severely on a bull elk in Oregon. I just nicked the back 1/4 of a rib and the arrow deflected almost 45 DEGREES! I attribute that more to a light carbon arrow and have since added 100 gr brass inserts. I guess that's the downside of these heads...on the other hand, I had an enormous blood trail to follow on the elk and I watched my moose expire, so....?

    Maybe I'll give a 2-blade a chance. Next up is caribou, any suggestions? Magnus, Zwickey?
    Howard Hill 160-grain. Will NEVER windplane, cuts 3" of green bone, and has taken every species of big game in North America. Has also taken cape buffalo, lion, and elephant (in a heavier weight).

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    Quote Originally Posted by Orelk6x6 View Post
    Excellent materials. Great for plywood and/or steel, perhaps, but the broadhead is just too wide for best meat penetration. The very best ratio of length to width is proven to be 3-to-1. For instance, 3" long and 1" wide. Thirty-four years of using the Howard HIll 160-grain broadhead, and with deer, caribou, moose, elk, bears (even a large Stellar sea lion, in the early days) and other big game, every shot has been through-and-through. I've never found a single one of those arrows! All game was taken with either 65- or 70-lb longbows, the best of which was of split bamboo with glass back and belly. Used only 11/32" Port Orford cedar arrows for their weight. You'll find a heavier arrow will penetrate much better than a lighter, faster arrow. Try it . . . . .

  20. #20

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    Don't get hung up too much on which two bladed broadhead to use. Any two blade head that's razor sharp will pass through an animal if the delivery is right. Meaning... true arrow flight (flying straight) and enough force behind it. Light arrows flying poorly are the main culprit for lack of penetration. 3 to 1 heads are better designed for penetration than wider angle heads. Yes, Howard Hill was ahead of his time with steel heads but there are much better heads out there now. The Kodiak's (formerly Grizzly's) are much better as long as you know how to sharpen a single bevel. If not then you can't go wrong with the Zwickey Eskimos. I'm using the Ace 160's this year with 100 grain woody weights behind it. Which bring up another point. (pun not intended) Not enough point weight also leads to poor arrow flight and lack of penetration. I'm shooting hickory shafts with 260 grains up front. Most of my arrows are 900-950grains. Yes this is heavier than most others shoot but it works for me out of my bamboo backed longbows at my ranges. I wouldn't want to go less than 125 grain head and a 550 grain arrow if I shot a compound. 300-400 grain arrows go fast but loose steam just as fast.

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