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Thread: Keeping your barrel cool

  1. #1
    Member HuntKodiak's Avatar
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    Default Keeping your barrel cool

    Been meaning to post some pictures of what I do to cool down my rifle barrels at the range, but just never seemed to remember even though I took pictures. This idea came to me after I bought my Kimber Montana 7-08 a little over a year ago. I was developing a load for last year's sheep hunt, and that thin barrel would heat up quickly. Range time would take forever. Then it dawned on me how to force more air through the barrel, and this solution has cut my time in half.....at least. The first solution just used a battery operated air pump designed for inflating air mattresses. Pointing the pump at the chamber cut my wait time in half. As you can see, I'd position the pump and rifle so the air would blow up towards the chamber, but some air obviously wouldn't make it up the barrel.







    Then this year I added the hose to the pump. I had to add a piece of clear hose to the end for it to fit snugly into the rifle. The ribbed hose makes a little noise with the air flowing through it, but the limited selection of hose here in Kodiak steered me this way for now. A smooth hose would perform better, plus, a thinner walled hose to replace the clear hose would be more flexible and easier to use. It would also make it easier to stand the gun on it's butt while forcing air through the barrel. That would work even better since heat naturally rises. However, my current setup works exceptionally well. This puts the air up the barrel to remove the heat from the hottest part of the barrel.....the inside. Pictures are from a range visit before I added the clear hose to the end. My son was practicing while burning up some old 30-06 ammo I had laying around.










    Kodiak doesn't get all that warm, but barrel heat can still be an issue. Plus, how many times can you simulate the "first shot" out of a cold barrel at the range. Using this contraption, I can cool the barrel down completely if I want, and then I can shoot the "first shot" again. For those of you in the lower 48 that shoot in the summer, a rig kinda like this may save you a lot of time at the range. Now I can go to the range with 3 rifles, and I can shoot normal speed while cycling through the rifles without having to wait.

    Good luck!

  2. #2

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    That should work. I usually take 2 center fire rifles to the range and I just leave the bolt open and practice off hand shooting with my old Browning T-Bolt while the big guns cools down. But, for about 5 months out of the year things seem to cool pretty fast around here!

  3. #3
    Member Smokey's Avatar
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    Default

    Very good idea for sure - thx for sharing!
    When asked what state I live in I say "The State of Confusion", better known as IL....

  4. #4
    Member HuntKodiak's Avatar
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    I definitely continue to take multiple guns to the range even though I use this cooling technique. Rarely do I show up with less than three rifles and at least one handgun of one sort or another. But a lot of times I have one gun in particular that I need to shoot more than the others because of the amount of load development I was doing. That is normally the gun that gets the majority of the cooling attention so I can shoot it after each time I shoot one of the other guns.

    Thanks for the comments. Hope the idea helps.

  5. #5
    Member alaskabliss's Avatar
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    Default

    That is some good thinking. It drives me crazy waiting for barrels to cool when developing loads.

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