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Thread: A little Ice fishing help?

  1. #1
    Member c6 batmobile's Avatar
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    Default A little Ice fishing help?

    Well its about time to brave the winter cold and get out on the ice and do some fishing. I have done plenty of fishing around AK this summer but I cant sit inside much longer. I have no experience in this area and would like some of you hardcore year round fishers to give me a little insight.


    What type of gear do I need? Tackle outside stuff etc.

    Where are some decent places for a beginner to go?

    What is the best way to tell if the ice is safe?

    Thanks again for the info. There are plenty of great people here and I appreciate it.
    Makin fur fins and feathers fly.

  2. #2
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    I hate to be the spoiler. But there are many recent threads about the question you just asked with plenty of good info already posted. Sometimes you just have to dig for it. Good luck.

    http://forums.outdoorsdirectory.com/...-to-icefishing
    http://forums.outdoorsdirectory.com/...ing-the-valley
    http://forums.outdoorsdirectory.com/...Gear-Questions

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    Quote Originally Posted by c6 batmobile View Post
    What is the best way to tell if the ice is safe?
    Make sure your friends are fatter than you are and tell em there's a 12 pack of PBR on the ice where you want to fish.

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    where you lookin to fish at (IE the kenai or around wasilla?) I go out with a sharp axe and whack it on the ice with the sarp side as hard as I can, any seepage and I back off a ways. with how cold its been I doubt it would be a problem, unless all teh snowis making a bunch of over flow....
    Eccleasties 8:11 Because the sentence against an evil deed is not executed quickly, There for the hearts of the sons of men among them are given fully to do evil.

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    Member FishGod's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by c6 batmobile View Post
    Well its about time to brave the winter cold and get out on the ice and do some fishing. I have done plenty of fishing around AK this summer but I cant sit inside much longer. I have no experience in this area and would like some of you hardcore year round fishers to give me a little insight.


    What type of gear do I need? Tackle outside stuff etc.

    Where are some decent places for a beginner to go?

    What is the best way to tell if the ice is safe?

    Thanks again for the info. There are plenty of great people here and I appreciate it.
    Check your mailbox
    Your bait stinks and your boat is ugly

  6. #6
    Member mainer_in_ak's Avatar
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    Generally, a portable Ice house, a heater, a hand auger for the early season, or a power auger for the late season. Bring a small game gun in places that allow hunting when times are slow. Beer and whiskey are major assets after very cold runs on a snowmachine. It's a relaxing asset to have after hard work. If you really want to access some good rivers and lakes, a snow machine would be an invaluable tool. Any of the smaller utility sleds work great. Older Ski Doo Scandics, Tundras, Arctic Cat Bearcats, Yamaha Bravo long tracks, and Polaris 340 or 440 longtrack machines. If walking by foot, snowshoes and a good tote sled work. If accessing by snowmachine, a cheap freight sled like the otter sleds will do. Make sure to purchase a portable that's big enough to lay down in as a nap is always nice.

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    Member mainer_in_ak's Avatar
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    Clothing:
    Only buy footwear that has removable liners so that you can remove them for drying. Buy an extra pair of liners and keep them in a small waterproof bag. Boots with insulation built in makes it difficult to keep your boots dry, and over time the insulation degrades and compresses loosing major insulating capabilities. Boots with liners last longer as you can replace the liners every two seasons. Thorlos mountaineering socks seem to be a great cold weather sock and one of the thickest I've found. Make sure you boots can fit a heavy set of socks.

    Nylon Snowmachine and Ice Fishing suits are noisey, but warm. I prefer Wool parkas and pants made By LL Bean. One particular parka has primaloft insualtion and the pants have a windshear lining. Elkskin Gloves and mitts with wool or fleece liners work great as you can take out the insulation to dry. Gloves with built in insulation makes it difficult to dry overnight. Again......the insulation eventually matts down, rendering most gloves worthless. Elk Leather is amazing stuff......sold by cabelas and LL Bean in the form of chopper mitts, and gloves. Filson makes about toughest wool inserts for gloves. LL been makes about the thickest wool mitts for use as insert inside of a chopper mitt. The double layer mitts have a finger top the folds back to expose your fingers for jobs that require dexterity.

    Tip ups and rods:

    Don't use monifilament ice fishing line, use braided ice fishing line. Buy the thinnest steel leaders they make and use them where you will be fishing for lakers and pike. The thinnest ones go undetectable. I prefer Allagash tip ups from Maine, and the cheapies offered buy the "Lameman's Warehouse" don't have good flag height. A skimmer with a long handle is important for frequently scooping the slush out of an ice hole. The large ones with a real hocky stick handle are the only way to go. They have a polymer skimmer that is flexible so you can beat it against something to knock off ice build up. Don't buy ice fishing rods with conventional eyes, get ice fishing rods with really wide eyes so that ice won't build up to a point where it impedes the function of the real. Small bait casting reals work well with braided, and open faced reels are absolute junk when it comes to ice fishing reels. I don't know where this idea came from.....Minnesota for sure I'd guess.

    Ice augers:
    Strikemaster is using a German engine Made by SOLO. It run's like a chainsaw, never felt anything like it.

    Packing beer:
    On long snowmachine trips, cans can and will get punctured which is always sad. Lay down bubble rap in between each layer of beers. Stack them vertically and make sure to use bubble wrap unless you want to see punctured beers, it's hard to look at. When it happens, I've felt like falling to the ground, unable to breath or move. Filling growlers is another option, but transfer that beer to something made of thick plastic as glass becomes very brittle in the cold.

  8. #8
    Member c6 batmobile's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mainer_in_ak View Post
    Clothing:
    Only buy footwear that has removable liners so that you can remove them for drying. Buy an extra pair of liners and keep them in a small waterproof bag. Boots with insulation built in makes it difficult to keep your boots dry, and over time the insulation degrades and compresses loosing major insulating capabilities. Boots with liners last longer as you can replace the liners every two seasons. Thorlos mountaineering socks seem to be a great cold weather sock and one of the thickest I've found. Make sure you boots can fit a heavy set of socks.

    Nylon Snowmachine and Ice Fishing suits are noisey, but warm. I prefer Wool parkas and pants made By LL Bean. One particular parka has primaloft insualtion and the pants have a windshear lining. Elkskin Gloves and mitts with wool or fleece liners work great as you can take out the insulation to dry. Gloves with built in insulation makes it difficult to dry overnight. Again......the insulation eventually matts down, rendering most gloves worthless. Elk Leather is amazing stuff......sold by cabelas and LL Bean in the form of chopper mitts, and gloves. Filson makes about toughest wool inserts for gloves. LL been makes about the thickest wool mitts for use as insert inside of a chopper mitt. The double layer mitts have a finger top the folds back to expose your fingers for jobs that require dexterity.

    Tip ups and rods:

    Don't use monifilament ice fishing line, use braided ice fishing line. Buy the thinnest steel leaders they make and use them where you will be fishing for lakers and pike. The thinnest ones go undetectable. I prefer Allagash tip ups from Maine, and the cheapies offered buy the "Lameman's Warehouse" don't have good flag height. A skimmer with a long handle is important for frequently scooping the slush out of an ice hole. The large ones with a real hocky stick handle are the only way to go. They have a polymer skimmer that is flexible so you can beat it against something to knock off ice build up. Don't buy ice fishing rods with conventional eyes, get ice fishing rods with really wide eyes so that ice won't build up to a point where it impedes the function of the real. Small bait casting reals work well with braided, and open faced reels are absolute junk when it comes to ice fishing reels. I don't know where this idea came from.....Minnesota for sure I'd guess.

    Ice augers:
    Strikemaster is using a German engine Made by SOLO. It run's like a chainsaw, never felt anything like it.

    Packing beer:
    On long snowmachine trips, cans can and will get punctured which is always sad. Lay down bubble rap in between each layer of beers. Stack them vertically and make sure to use bubble wrap unless you want to see punctured beers, it's hard to look at. When it happens, I've felt like falling to the ground, unable to breath or move. Filling growlers is another option, but transfer that beer to something made of thick plastic as glass becomes very brittle in the cold.
    Awesome info. Thank you.

    I have some insulated carharts that are pretty toasty but Im sure if they get wet they are gonna be a real PITA to dry out.

    I LOL'ed at the beer suggestion. Ive never ridden through snow. When taking trips through the sand we used to pack a back pack with a trash bag and fill it with crushed ice (cubed will puncture the beers) and that would do the trick.

    rep sent to ya and Fish God.
    Makin fur fins and feathers fly.

  9. #9
    Member sayak's Avatar
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    Geesh Mainer!, I've been using Eskimo augers, open face reels and monofilament for nearly 40 years!
    But your ideas about snowgoes, wool and packing beer all have merit.

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