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Thread: Eating fresh meat

  1. #1
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    Default Eating fresh meat

    Ok guys i have a question. We were in deer camp and i cut out some tenderloins of the deer we shot and grilled them up for supper. They were outstanding. One guy would not eat any as he sid he heard its bad to eat meat right after its killed and that to be safe it needs to sit for at least 8hrs. He said he knew guys who got sicker than dogs for eating mosse backstrap right after they shot it. Has anyone ever hear of this?

  2. #2
    Moderator kingfisherktn's Avatar
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    I've also heard that all my life, but never have experienced any type of illness from eating fresh meat or have heard of anyone else getting sick from eating fresh meat. I consider it a 'wives tale'.

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    That's bunk...so long as you cook it so that it's done, there will be no problems. If it's cooked to the correct temp all the way to the middle then anything in there will be killed. These other hunters that supposedly got sick from eating it could have been sick from something else. Did they drink untreated water? Was it the brown bottle flu? Or some other food that was eaten that may have spoiled.

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    Moderator stid2677's Avatar
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    Never heard that and I cook and eat fresh game meat all the time. Even when all I have is a stick.











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  5. #5

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    Eat up. Never feel bad if some one is superstitious or uninformed and does not want to eat fresh back strap, more for you! I am not a fan of liver, it tastes like liver to me, wife loves it. So fresh liver and onions is often ate in the hunting camp. She also likes cutting a piece off fat off a moose once it has cooled down. She thinks it is good, tastes like moose fat to me.

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    Stid2677
    Did you have to post those pics? Now i am hungry! That looks like a meal you could not beat anywhere at any price! I would like mine medium or medium rare. I bet that was a meal to remember.

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    Member hoose35's Avatar
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    have eaten fresh tenderloins, backstrap, heart several times without ever getting sick in any way
    Responsible Conservation > Political Allocation

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    Moderator stid2677's Avatar
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    I cook fresh meat on every hunt I'm successful on. Just got back from Kodiak, we only took dried food as we were bear hunting. After the bear was bagged I found a few pans and an old wire rack and melted some deer fat for cooking grease and threw a rack of ribs on the fire with some rub and parm cheese.









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    Never heard of waiting any length of time before cooking. I and others I have hunted with have always cooked fresh backstrap or tenderloin right after the packing was done, no one has ever been sick from it, even cooked medium rare. Cooked many a bird right after killing also, but I always cook them through, never eat bird medium rare or less done.

  10. #10

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    I cooked a mess of fresh moose tenderloin this year, called it poison meat when it was done, but it didn't seem to slow anyone down.


    It all disappeared like magic. Three days hanging sure helps though.. cuts the gas factor for sure..

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    Hmmmmmmmmmmmmm...........with seal oil, fresh twitching meats or 1/2 frozen inna few winter minutes and its "Dinner"....or hot and raw, like liver, Kidneys and such.

    I also feed raw meat to my dogs, always have, and they are the sweetest friends with my kids
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    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    If anything, waiting longer increases the risk of food-borne illness. Most food sickness comes from bacterial growth, and the longer meat is sitting around the longer any bacteria have to grow. None of that matters if the meat is cooked properly, but put simply, your friend's idea is completely backwards. The sooner meat is consumed the less likely it is to get sick from it.

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    A reason to wait a day is to let rigor mortis leave the meat. Rigor sets in very shortly after death and can increase toughness in the meat. Waiting a day or so lets the rigor run its course.

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    I've been sick after eating meat from a fresh kill. I don't think it was the meat, as much as it was the whiskey though?

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    Supporting Member Amigo Will's Avatar
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    Back in the day my kin folk didn't even cook it.
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    As Lab man said, fresh meat can be on the chewy side. Natural enzymes break it down and tenderize it as it ages. That's why they age beef in a cooler too before it's processed. But other than that I don't know of any side affects from eating it fresh. Some cuts such as tenderloins will be easier to chew than others. I love fresh heart, and also have been known to cut a rack of ribs from a deer to wrap in foil and throw on the camp fire.
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    Typically I chew on hte meat right under hte hide, its like gum, while i'm skinning moose or cows or what ever. 'traditionally" I make some kabobs and a tiny fire and make one peice for each person helping, just a little peice soaked with berrys or covered in leaves or what ever, just to make ya think.

    that is always right when we start, if I eat meat after I get done butchering something that big, I cant stomach it and I start burping and get a horrible upset stomach, bot only if I eat the meat of the animal I killed, I don;t know why, maybe its a mental thing....
    Eccleasties 8:11 Because the sentence against an evil deed is not executed quickly, There for the hearts of the sons of men among them are given fully to do evil.

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    I gotta Hunt with Stid....... at least hunt outta the same camp.....'cause that there is good food, and always the finale' to any hunt. If you screw up the cookin' or theres no Seal oil for the frozen, well, then was it all worth it??~~LOL!!~~

    I should fire up a grill when the winds die, its 20 below and breezy, but I now Must have grilled fat Caribou ribs.....
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  19. #19
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    Eating fresh meat is part of the hunt and experience. I took my daughter on her first caribou hunt this fall and she still talks how good the meat was that night at camp.
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  20. #20

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    Fresh meat actually contains significantly more nutrition than aged meat. There are several reasons for this, but the main reason is that water loss during "cold shortening" also causes the loss of many dissolved nutrients. In commercial slaughterhouses, this is mostly prevented by the electrical stimulation of carcasses, which depletes ATP reserves prior to the onset of rigor mortis. In the field, cold shortening actually aids us in meat preservation, but the meat does not have the same nutritional profile after being aged as it did when fresh.

    I've never gotten sick after eating fresh meat, but I have an unproven theory about why some people might have cramps, experienced as an upset stomach. Fresh meat eaten prior to the onset of rigor mortis still contains unused ATP reserves, and the cessation of cellular respiration naturally causes the diffusion of stored ionic calcium. This combination of ATP and calcium ions trigger the muscular contraction of rigor mortis, so perhaps if consumed in sufficient quantity they might cause muscular contractions in the digestive system? It's just a theory, but aged meat contains low levels of these chemicals because they're mostly used up during rigor mortis and aging.
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