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Thread: Log Cabin Kit (3-sided logs) versus 2x6 Construction

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    Default Log Cabin Kit (3-sided logs) versus 2x6 Construction

    I was pondering the relative merits of 2x6 construction versus 6-inch or 8-inch 3-sided logs in a prefabricated kit. The cabin(s) would notionally be between 12x16 and 16x32 with lofts and 12:12 roofs. Here are some thoughts. What do all of you think? True? False? Are there any other important considerations?

    2x6 Construction:

    No settling problems.
    More light inside because of dry-wall and some wood panelling.
    A familiar framing process (for me) vs. lack of experience with logs.
    No need to spend scores of hours applying perma-chink

    Pre-fabricated 3-sided log cabin kit:

    No need to install siding. (I would have to on the 2x6 construction, because I would not want T-111).
    Better re-sale value (particularly to out of state buyers who desire genuine “log” cabins).
    Greater bear resistance.

    Unknown comparative merits:

    Total cost of materials?
    Total weight of materials?
    Speed and ease of construction, especially single-handed?
    R values?
    Maintenance and durability?

  2. #2
    Member cdubbin's Avatar
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    Logs are attractive, but I prefer framed walls. You get a tighter, easier to heat house and have more options on finish materials. All you need for building is a Skilsaw, hammer, tape and pencil.
    "– Gas boats are bad enough, autos are an invention of the devil, and airplanes are worse." ~Allen Hasselborg

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    a 12:12 roof would be a pain to put roofing on, personally, Log kits a relativly cheap, but you gotta remember that you are only getting the walls, you don't get the floor or roof (typically) and running plumbing and wireing would be difficoult in a log house. where as a framed house is easy to build (from personal expierianc) and its easy to wire and plumb, to a point. if you ever need help, there are alot of framers out of work, where as I don;t know anybody who builds log cabins.
    Eccleasties 8:11 Because the sentence against an evil deed is not executed quickly, There for the hearts of the sons of men among them are given fully to do evil.

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    If you are building yourself and buying everything, i would say go with 2x6 frame for the following reasons:
    1: materials are generally lighter when loading/unloading
    2: its easier to raise walls as a stick frame then hang everything off of it after it is vertical than it is to lift a 8" log over your head on your own.
    3: as mentioned earlier, its easier for pipes and wirse in stick frame.
    4: its easier to change, add-on, or fix stick frame walls.
    5: less shrinkage, warping and/or splitting due to the natural trndancy of wood to "breath" and suck-up and expell moisture

    with that being said, i (personally) would cut my own trees, and build from real log, not a prefab kit. A real log place just feels more homey and comfortable to me and in a cabin, thats what i want, comfortable. to obtain this comfort, i am willing to do the extra work to get exactly what i want.

    In the end, its YOUR place and you are the only one that can really decide what is right for you. good luck with however you decide to build and i hope all turns out well. work safe, never take shortcuts esp. if you are by yourself

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    are these cabins you would be using alot, or more of "trapline" cabins? I put up a 8X10 log shack with just an axe in a few days, it was about 6 feet tall at one end adn 8 at the other, it was totoaly free, I shinked it with moss and swamp mud, and I didn't ave a door, but it was alll mine, till dad siad we were clearing another couple acres for field and I had to take it down, I was gonna build one again this year, but we were trana get teh farm goin good and ran outta time.

    I didn't have a foundation or windows and the logs werent peeled eather. but ti was easy to put make. and it was an awesome "base camp" for a 14 year old
    Eccleasties 8:11 Because the sentence against an evil deed is not executed quickly, There for the hearts of the sons of men among them are given fully to do evil.

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    Quote Originally Posted by cdubbin View Post
    Logs are attractive, but I prefer framed walls. You get a tighter, easier to heat house and have more options on finish materials. All you need for building is a Skilsaw, hammer, tape and pencil.
    I prefer framed walls too. That said, Norwegians very long ago and Americans less long ago built log cabins with nothing but a scribe and axe.

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    Quote Originally Posted by FamilyMan View Post
    I prefer framed walls too. That said, Norwegians very long ago and Americans less long ago built log cabins with nothing but a scribe and axe.
    So true! Being about 1/8 Finnish, I'd love to build a Scandinavian-style log cabin someday, but I probably won't want to live in it year-round.
    "– Gas boats are bad enough, autos are an invention of the devil, and airplanes are worse." ~Allen Hasselborg

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    x2 on framing. Whatever you build this year, at some point you'll change your mind -- adding on, changing windows, electric, plumbing, etc. 2x6 seems simpler to adapt.

    A 12-12 roof slides snow off nicely, but if you're doing a loft with that roof, spend the extra $100 and put in a couple of feet of pony wall so that you don't have those tight 45 degree angles at the floor. You'll get a much larger amount of useable space. The guy I bought from didn't, and I grumble about it every time I go upstairs.

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