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Thread: Drying Extra Toughs

  1. #1

    Default Drying Extra Toughs

    Over a year ago I flooded my Extra Toughs. They have a built in insole that doesnt seem to be removable. I cant get them properly dry. They make my socks wet when I wear them. I have had them on boot dryers for about four days and sitting inside for thr rest of the time.

    Anyone have a solution to this?

  2. #2
    Member AlaskaHippie's Avatar
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    The insoles should be removable. If not rice wrapped in newspaper has worked for me in the past.
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  3. #3

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    I would fold the tops down halfway and leave them in a warm place, preferrably on a warm surface with the tops facing up and soles down. That way the moisture can evaporate out. Otherwise, even with a boot dryer the boots are upside down and the moisture is trapped inside. Need to leave them face up so the moisure goes out the top. Don't get them too hot.

  4. #4

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    Quote Originally Posted by SlowLeadBullets View Post
    Over a year ago I flooded my Extra Toughs. They have a built in insole that doesnt seem to be removable. I cant get them properly dry. They make my socks wet when I wear them. I have had them on boot dryers for about four days and sitting inside for thr rest of the time.

    Anyone have a solution to this?
    I sincerely hope those are typos! If they're not, and the boots have remained soaked while sitting inside for an entire year, then they should be covered with a thick layer of mold by now. And after four days without results, the boot dryers would seem to be broken as well.

    The main thing that dries boots is airflow, so get air moving inside them, whether you use boot dryers, a fan, or some other means. Personally, I just blot mine dry with a small towel, then hang them upside down next to my waders, and never have a problem.
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    Member akjeff's Avatar
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    A boot dryer will get them dry. It may take a while but it will work. Also if there is mud or mildew inside or flooded with salt water, wash them out first. Try some baking soda and water or just soap and water. Let them soak, rinse well and then attempt to dry them.

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    Something isn't right here. If left inside a house even completely soaked xtratuffs will dry out on their own. Remember that xtratuffs don't breath so if you wear them for awhile it's likely your socks get wet from sweat.

    The other suggestion is you have a hole in your boots and they keep getting wet every time you wear them.

    There is no possible way that they are still wet from a year ago. Unless they were stored wet in a plastic bag for 11.5 month.
    I'd agree with you, but then we'd both be wrong.

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    Supporting Member Amigo Will's Avatar
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    In the S.E. our Extra tuffs come pre-soaked on the inside from the factory.I believe thats how they are supposed to stay.
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    Moderator kingfisherktn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Amigo Will View Post
    In the S.E. our Extra tuffs come pre-soaked on the inside from the factory.I believe thats how they are supposed to stay.
    That's close......

    If you're not familiar with the blue, insulated Bamas made by Extra-Tuff, they are worth their weight in gold. They are a slip on type of sock that goes over your normal socks. They insulate, plus collect the condensation (sweat) occurring in your boots. When I pull them off at night most of the dampness stays in the Bama and not in your boot or socks. I buy my ET one size larger just to accommodate the Bamas.

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    Supporting Member Amigo Will's Avatar
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    Bamas are great for sure
    Now left only to be a turd in the forrest and the circle will be complete.Use me as I have used you

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    Quote Originally Posted by AKBoater View Post
    ...The other suggestion is you have a hole in your boots and they keep getting wet every time you wear them.
    ...
    +1. Sounds like a hole in the sole.

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    I think I'd take the time to fill both carefully with water, then let them sit. Watch to see if any water can be seen on the outside. That might take a day if they are insulated. If not, no hole.
    If you've been using a boot dryer, I'd suspect the working part went awol. I've dried out chest waders faster than what sounds like you are doing.
    Roll them down, place on a warm surface like the furnace if possible, and they should be dry in a few days at most. After that, get some insoles to put inside them, and pull them after every use. I like wearing mine that way. More cushion, warmer, and when I put the boot back on they are dry. Maybe get 2 pair if you wear them every day.
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    When I used to commercial fish where there was no electricity, I kept my boots dry by having several potato size rocks sitting on the stove at all times. When I was done with the boots for a while I would fold down the boots as far as possible and drop in the heated rocks. When I wanted to put the boots back on, I removed the rocks (put them back on the stove) and pulled on a toasty warm, dry pair of boots.

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    i do the same thing with rocks, works good for leather boots. for rubber hip waders (I would assume they would be about the same) filling them full of crumpeled up news paper after rolling them down as far as possible, works good, if they are really wet you might have to change them out a few times.
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  14. #14

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    Easiest I have found is two sets of felt insoles.. every time you take the boots off take the felt insole out, and hang it where it will dry.. put the pre dried one back in the boot.. it wicks moisture to it.. this works great.. and if you are diligent about changing the insoles every time.. you stay dry. Even when commercial fishing, and my boots don't get time to dry this works.. and as someone mentioned here.. roll the cuffs down and set the boot upright so the chimney effect dries what moisture there is out of the boot. I do the same with my boot bottom waders.. and stay plenty comfortable and dry. even if the boots don't get a chance to come in the house, and get near a heat source, this seems to work.

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    Roll them down and set them on top of your hot water heater. Just enough heat to push heat from the bottom up.

  16. #16

    Thumbs up Drying out gear.

    I have had some success in using a shop vac with the hose put on the outlet side and blowing huge volumes of air into and over gear of all kinds. It helps get the vast majority of moisture out and then leave them open to the open air as much as possible.
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    Member AK Troutbum's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sayak View Post
    When I used to commercial fish where there was no electricity, I kept my boots dry by having several potato size rocks sitting on the stove at all times. When I was done with the boots for a while I would fold down the boots as far as possible and drop in the heated rocks. When I wanted to put the boots back on, I removed the rocks (put them back on the stove) and pulled on a toasty warm, dry pair of boots.
    Great idea. I think that I'll try this with my late season fishing trips and those cold morning hunts. I'm thinking, wrap some rocks in aluminum foil, toss in the fire, once heated, unwrap and stick in my boots. I don't know why I never thought of this before, probably 'cus I'm an idiot

  18. #18
    Member HuntKodiak's Avatar
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    Good idea with the shop vac. I do something similar with heated air on my boat. I finally created a thread over in the Power Boating forum to show what I do if you are interested. Thread is titled Drying Boots.

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    As commercial fisherman and people whose house is only accessible via skiff, my husband and I live in our xtra tuffs. Crumple up several sheets of newspaper and shove it down into the toes and fill the boot back to the heel. this will pull all the water from the inside of the boot into the paper. Setting them on a high shelf near the wood stove overnight with the paper in them does wonders! This also works for drying out the inside of a drysuit (somehow I seem to always get water in my drysuit feet?) and probably for waders too.

    Quote Originally Posted by SlowLeadBullets View Post
    Over a year ago I flooded my Extra Toughs. They have a built in insole that doesnt seem to be removable. I cant get them properly dry. They make my socks wet when I wear them. I have had them on boot dryers for about four days and sitting inside for thr rest of the time.

    Anyone have a solution to this?

  20. #20
    Member BRWNBR's Avatar
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    i've seen alot of people try to dry rubber boots upside down, but i've always sat them right side up as mentioned here, heat the bottom and let the moisture evap out the top.felt insoles are awesome too, i take mine out at night and throw them in my sleeping bag..dry feet every morning. i live in hipboots on kodiak and rubber boots the rest of the year, used to do sheep/goat hunts in waders as well...
    but it does sound like theres a hidden problem here thats keepin' you wet....
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