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Thread: Sheetrock vs. T&G

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    Member Boone's Avatar
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    Default Sheetrock vs. T&G

    I have a cabin with sheetrocked interior. I've been considering replacing the rock with pine T&G for a more rustic feel. Is there any benefit to simply installing the T&G over the exsisting sheetrock? I understand it will deepen my window & door sills. Extra layer of insulation may be beneficial. Any thoughts?

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    Why not have T&G up to the bottom of the windows. Ceiling bright white & upper walls a light'ish earth tones.

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    Quote Originally Posted by AGL4now View Post
    Why not have T&G up to the bottom of the windows. Ceiling bright white & upper walls a light'ish earth tones.
    I like that. 1/2" T&G you think?

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    It would be more of a PITA to remove the rock that it is worth. Just go right over the top of it. I second AGL's idea of running about 1/4 to 1/3 up the wall; basically to chair rail height. Go ahead and paint it first to save you a bunch of taping at the top of the chair rail. I used bright white for all the ceilings in my house and have various tans, browns, and greens for the wall colors throughout. With the ol' cabin motife decorations, it gives a very rustic feel to ordinary sheetrock walls.
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    Drywall under wood paneling is a sound building practice. Drywall won't burn. That's it's primary attribute in construction. Your structure and it's occupants are better off with it there.

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    Great, thanks. I see lots of examples of vertical installation of the T&G. What are the reasons for not running horizontal? Isn't the rule "horizontal lines make it look taller while vertical make the room feel longer?". Much faster and fewer cuts with a horizontal install. Would that pose problems with the ridge cap?

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    Horizontal is easier since you can nail to studs. You should add horizontal nailers if you prefer to run the boards vertcally. More work and the paneling will stand off the wall even further. I prefer boards to run horizontal if the paneling is from floor to ceiling and vertical for half-height wainscot. I have vertical wainscot in my living room applied to horizontal nailers. The addition of paneling and nailer thickness makes for interesting trim details at the wainscot top cap and around windows and doors. Stacking the boards horizontally to the ceiling covers more area but is faster/easier.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mr. Pid View Post
    Horizontal is easier since you can nail to studs. You should add horizontal nailers if you prefer to run the boards vertcally. More work and the paneling will stand off the wall even further.
    My thoughts exactly. The cabin is already small and doesn't need to loose any more inches!

    What size would you go with and what is a good source for pine T&G?

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    I got mine at Home Depot. They usually stock 1x6 T&G in pine and cedar. Pine price was the same as SBS but I got to select out the bad boards at Home Depot. I had to go to two stores to fill the order. Last spring I paneled my sunroom with cedar. Much more expensive but in that room it really pops. Last I checked Lowe's had discontinued T&G paneling.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mr. Pid View Post
    Horizontal is easier since you can nail to studs. . .
    Exactly. Top the wainscoting with a nicely detailed, fairly heavy, chair rail molding. The strong, horizontal lines of the wainscoting will make the room seem bigger while not sacrificing the brightness of the sheetrock walls above. Doing the entire walls in paneling would make the room seem smaller and, in my opinion, be too "woodsy," even oppressive.

    Good luck . .

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    datto the chair rail and base board trim to lock t-g to wall if goin with vertical wainscoating) and also use liquid nails on everything , paint black behind t-g areas incase of shrinkage and knot holes for nice look... always angle finish nails back and forth as to make almost imposible to tearoff /fall off walls -caulk windows and doors BEFORE trimming and after get box extenstions for outlets and switches

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    Another alternative install is to split the wall in the center and run your T&G on a downward angle to each side (45 or 30). I'm sure the carpenters have some fancy name for doing that. My ol' man did the entire inside of his log house that way and it looks great. Yes, there's much more cutting and measuring, but the results are worth the effort.
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    Quote Originally Posted by ALASKANRMK View Post
    ...and also use liquid nails on everything , paint black behind t-g areas incase of shrinkage and knot holes for nice look... always angle finish nails back and forth as to make almost imposible to tearoff /fall off walls
    Great advice, thanks! I especially like the idea of painting the wall black behind the paneling...genius.

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    Where is your cabin located? To calculate how much you need to cover the area, multiply your square footage by 2.4 to give you lineal footage of 1x6 tng needed to cover it.

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    Quote Originally Posted by AKDoug View Post
    Where is your cabin located? To calculate how much you need to cover the area, multiply your square footage by 2.4 to give you lineal footage of 1x6 tng needed to cover it.
    Cabin is in Sutton. The cabin is 16x22 and I'm going 3' up the wall. If I'm correct, 548 pineal feet? Have some extra?

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    If you have electrical outlets you will need to shim out the outlets for access and the face plates unless you box around them. Little experiencail knowledge.

    George

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    Home Depot and Lowes have simple extensions for the electric boxes to bring the outlets and switches out flush with added paneling. I've seen them in plastic and metal and prefer the metal ones myself. Very handy for T&G projects.

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