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Thread: Please talk me into a .300 WSM/WM

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    Default Please talk me into a .300 WSM/WM

    Here's my issue. I ran a 300wm for over ten years almost exclusively especially when hunting. A few years ago while having it rebarreled I decided to make a change and had a Brux chambered in 7mmRM spun on it. Longrange shooting is a hobby of mine so I must admit I was seduced by the wonderful ballistics and efficiency of the .284 projectiles. It was also during the big crunch on reloading supplies and I was looking for something a little cheaper to feed. Although this is my primary hunting rig and not my longrange precision rifle I do practice out to 1000 yards with it for giggles and to become intimately familiar with it's performance downrange. Since changing to the 7mm I've taken 3 moose and several black bears. I've been running the 160 Accubonds because of their decent BC, long range accuracy, and I always had good luck with them out of the 300. Well, I haven't been terribly impressed with them on heavy animals out of the 7mm. On the B bears it was just the ticket, but on large moose they do alot more bouncing around and not pushing through especially when they encounter bone. Just as an example, last year I shot a 63" bull at about 30 yards. I hit him in the spine right behind his head. The bullet literally bounced off his spine traveled the length of his neck and shattered several vertebrae in his hump. I had a similar experience on this years moose (60 1/4") but at 150ish yards. Not a CNS shot, but lots of bouncing around with a shot right behind the shoulder. (no bone encountered) I could jump up to the 175 partition or something similar but they aren't exactly good longrange bullets.

    So, to get to the point, I'm coming to the end of this barrel soon and will be sending it off for another. Although I have no good reason for it, I'm just not feeling j***ed about going back to a 300. I've looked pretty hard at bumping up to a 338 with 225gr NAB (bc .550), but it's really more rifle than is necessary here in the interior. The .30 cals really seem to be just the ticket for around here, and without replacing the bolt I'm stuck with the magnum rounds. Any thoughts would be appreciated.

    Thanks.

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    Member hodgeman's Avatar
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    If you're rebarrelling a long action there is absolutely no reason to go with a WSM...now if you're talking a whole new rifle I really like my .300WSM a whole bunch. Ballistically with 150-180 bullets there isn't a nickle's worth of difference in them although the standard .300WM will do better with 200gr and up. I haven't shot a .308 bullet over 180gr in a long time since modern bullets are so darn good. On a standard length action the .300 WM is pretty hard to beat in a lot of respects and a .300WSM on a lightweight rifle is giving you the same killing potential is a little lighter package...the critter will never know the difference so its really you're preference depending on whether you're keeping your action or acquiring a whole new project.

    As far as performance with your 7mm, I've heard that some of those long and pointy projectiles don't penetrate straight line too well and tend to curve through a critter depending on what you hit. I can't say that as fact because I've never personally observed it. Many of the old timers like Bell and Alphin insist on RN or flatter point bullets for bigger game critters...a lot of conjecture on the subject so the truth probably lies somewhere in the middle. Bell did say that the longest 6.5 and 7mm steel jacketed solids he shot through game tended to bend and I've personally seen a couple of poorly expanded TSX that were bent.

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    If I went back to a 30 cal I'd be running the 200gr ABs.(BC .588) It's a good long range projectile and works well as a hunting bullet as well. The reasoning for the 300wsm in a long action would be to avoid seating depth limitations due to the length of the magazine and I already have it. I know I've run into this problem with my 7-08 trying to run heavies. (160s, 168s) I've never reloaded for a 300WSM so I don't have any experience with that round. I know people planning on running the heavy 7mm bullets in 7WSMs build them on LA for just this reason. Thanks for you input, I'd never heard that about the heavy 7mm pills not running straight after impact. Certainly what I've experienced though. Learn something new every day.

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    Quote Originally Posted by ykrvak View Post
    If I went back to a 30 cal I'd be running the 200gr ABs.(BC .588) It's a good long range projectile and works well as a hunting bullet as well. The reasoning for the 300wsm in a long action would be to avoid seating depth limitations due to the length of the magazine and I already have it. I know I've run into this problem with my 7-08 trying to run heavies. (160s, 168s) I've never reloaded for a 300WSM so I don't have any experience with that round. I know people planning on running the heavy 7mm bullets in 7WSMs build them on LA for just this reason. Thanks for you input, I'd never heard that about the heavy 7mm pills not running straight after impact. Certainly what I've experienced though. Learn something new every day.
    Since you want to drive 200 Grain Accubonds, why not a 325WSM. I have had amazing results with mine both with taking game and awesome accuracy and have taken game beyond 400 yards with a factory Winchester model 70.

    My 325WSM 200 Grain Accubond load using Reloader 17 is on the 3200fps range.
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    That's not a bad idea. I've looked into that one a bit. It does utilize the same powders as some of the other rifles I use frequently (338, 280, 7-08, 30-06) which is a big plus as I have it on hand. Flying powder in the wintertime is a hassle and expensive. I guess I looked away from it due to the less efficient bullets. However this is primarily a hunting rifle so what really matters is it's performance at reasonable hunting distances. I might shoot longrange for fun, but like many, when hunting I'm a firm believer in getting as close as possible. Maybe I'll give that round another look. Thanks.

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    While the lighter bullets used in the 325 WSM doesn't have the BC of the 7mm's they work well on most game at reasonable ranges. The heavier 8mm bullets however have a very good BC and sectional density and at WSM speeds perform well. The 325 WSM is a gap filling round between the 300 Win Mag and 338 Wm. Many of the bullets used in the 8mm caliber are designed for the 8mm Rem Mag round and are well constructed for moose and heavy game. It would also allow you to seat your bullets at desired lengths since you're considering using a long action as a base action.
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    Thanks for the links. I'll check them out. What length tube are you running to get up near 3200 fps with the 200's? Must be 26" I would guess. Also, it must be a pretty warm load. Thanks again for the reading material.

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    Thanks brav01. I'm going to do some searching around on components for that round and see what I can find. It appears 200 is the heaviest nosler makes but I'll look at the other manufacturers and see what I come up with.

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    Quote Originally Posted by ykrvak View Post
    Thanks for the links. I'll check them out. What length tube are you running to get up near 3200 fps with the 200's? Must be 26" I would guess. Also, it must be a pretty warm load. Thanks again for the reading material.
    Mine has a stock 24inch barrel, my loads are above published data, but no loads showed any sign of over pressure.
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    Quote Originally Posted by ykrvak View Post
    Thanks brav01. I'm going to do some searching around on components for that round and see what I can find. It appears 200 is the heaviest nosler makes but I'll look at the other manufacturers and see what I come up with.
    Check Midway there are several 8mm bullets that are heavier than 200 gr. Hawk may also have some heavy bullets. Just be sure that the bullets are compatable with the rifling twist. Not exactly sure what the proper twist would for heavy bullets. Research required.
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    This is strictly my opinion only,, A shooter is much better served by deciding would projectile they wish to launch, then pick a rifle and chambering that works best with the desired bullet than the other way around.
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    Quote Originally Posted by stid2677 View Post
    This is strictly my opinion only,, A shooter is much better served by deciding would projectile they wish to launch, then pick a rifle and chambering that works best with the desired bullet than the other way around.
    While doing the research you should consider the ranges at which you'll be shooting and animals which you intend to push these bullets through as well. Then the terrain and physical capabilities also figure into the equation.
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    The 325 wizzum is a round I haven't really looked into before. I'll have plenty of reading to do in order to educate myself and see if it's going to be what will work for me. It certainly won't hurt to look into it. I appreciate the thoughts and replies.

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    Quote Originally Posted by brav01 View Post
    While doing the research you should consider the ranges at which you'll be shooting and animals which you intend to push these bullets through as well. Then the terrain and physical capabilities also figure into the equation.
    Oh, it's going to be taken to 1000 on steel. There is no doubt about that! As far as hunting goes, moose and bears are primarily what are available in my neck of the woods and I have limits for myself regarding how far I'm willing to stretch out for a living target. If I can't get closer than that, I better start working harder on my stalking skills.

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    For the reloader, the 325WSM offers flat shooting, hard hitting power that can deliver 200 grain premium bullets with accuracy and authority to ethically and efficiently harvest game out to the average shooters range without the punishing recoil that often comes with the Winchester 338 Win Mag. The 325WSM has the shoulder angle that makes them very easy to feed, much like the 270, 30-06 and 375.

    If I were wanting to hunt with a 180 Grain bullet, I would choose the 300WSM to launch it, only to use the short action and get away from the belted 300 Win Mag as the ballistics are almost a wash.

    If a 200 Grain bullet was what I was looking for, a 325WSM would be my choice with the 338 being my choice for 225 Grainers.
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    like std, I like the 325 WSM very much and have killed moose and elk with it and been pleased - alternately, I like the 220 grain SBT's and have been able to get a bit over 2800 and 3/4" 100 yd groups with the Kimber Montana - just to muddy the waters a little I'll say that a buddy of mine has worked up a load in a Tikka T3 300 WSM with 200 Accubonds that shoots lights out 1/2" 200 yd groups and sub 1" @ 100 in his Montana - he hasn't chrono'd the load but the book "says" 2900 +/- - at 1000 the extra .100 in B.C. might make a difference worth mentioning and the 200 /.30 has a great S.D. as well

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    Lots of helpful feedback here guys. Don't be concerned about muddying the waters. No decisions are final until I have the smith chamber the blank so feel free to muddy away. If I didn't want the opinions I wouldn't have asked for them.

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    Now I see...chambering a short cartridge in a long action would allow you to seat the heavy stuff farther out... If you're going to be essentially handloading all the time and have the action length for it a 8mmRM might not be a bad choice either- probably slightly better ballistics than a .325. I think a standard 700LA will give you enough length.

    As for reloading the .300WSM...its been pretty much a snap and I've loaded 150, 165, and 180s with RL17 and I get wonderful accuracy and velocity, don't know about 200s- pretty sure my rifle would require that I seat them really deep to fit through the mag.

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    I love my 325 in Kimber's Montana and think that the 325 is just about the perfect all around Alaska cartridge. The package is light to carry, does not knock my fillings out and will sling factory & homespun 220G bullets of sturdy construction well above 2.5-2.6K fps. I really like that version of the WSM.
    That said I have a long action 300 that I am think on a tube re-fit and as I all ready have a 358 Norma I think a 300-338 would be a pretty good cartridge for both fun at the range and long(er) range hunting. This of course would be a reloading only option but that is fun too.

    Quote Originally Posted by stid2677 View Post
    Since you want to drive 200 Grain Accubonds, why not a 325WSM. I have had amazing results with mine both with taking game and awesome accuracy and have taken game beyond 400 yards with a factory Winchester model 70.

    My 325WSM 200 Grain Accubond load using Reloader 17 is on the 3200fps range.

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