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Thread: Gunsmithing

  1. #1
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    Default Gunsmithing

    So- I made the lunge to get a serious rifle.

    Bought a Rem 700, 300 RUM. I sent it off to have a muzzle break and to have the action blue printed.

    I thought squaring the barrel/bolt and lapping the lugs would be worth it.

    But I have some "friends" that say I pissed my $ away. So whats your opinion?

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    Member Casper50's Avatar
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    Most rifles made lately can shoot better groups from the factory than the average shooter can hold. JMO

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    I would have saved the money or bought another gun or extra ammo
    Now left only to be a turd in the forrest and the circle will be complete.Use me as I have used you

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    How did the 700 chambered in 300RUM shoot??
    Do you handload for the chambering??

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    Member tboehm's Avatar
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    Try the gunsmithing section and see what gets recommended, Hope the new toy works for you
    Semper Fi and God Bless

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    I did the same , plus a jewell trigger,badger rail and rings and bedded. Night force 5.5x22x50 scope and 180gr. ttsx and 94grains of Rl 25 powder it shoots a 5"' group at 500 yards. I got a box of 200gr. accubonds to try next. Will be shooting out to 1,000 yards this summer.Let us know how she shoots would ya.

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    I think it depends on how it shot for you. If you were getting good groups I would have saved my money. If you were not happy with the groups then maybe it will help, it can't hurt. Years ago I dumped a bunch of money into a Mod. 70 Winchester "Classic Stainless" in .338 Win. Mag. caliber. After I put the after market parts on and lapped the barrel it would consistently shoot into an inch with 225 or 250 grain Barnes X bullets. That was with the factory stock and my bedding job. When I sent the rifle to Basner's Ultimate Rifles to have their 20 oz. stock installed I asked them about lapping the lugs and blue printing the action. When we discussed how the rifle was shooting the guy I talked to said if it was his rifle he would leave it alone, so I did. Now if a guy plans on poking a hole in a critter at 500 yards and beyond on a regular basis it it probably pays to have a sub 1" hundred yard rifle, especially if the critters are smaller then caribou. Your chosen caliber certainly has the potential to do that. I don't think I do though.

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    Quote Originally Posted by AKmuscle49 View Post
    So- I made the lunge to get a serious rifle.

    Bought a Rem 700, 300 RUM. I sent it off to have a muzzle break and to have the action blue printed.

    I thought squaring the barrel/bolt and lapping the lugs would be worth it.

    But I have some "friends" that say I pissed my $ away. So whats your opinion?
    IMO rifles are such a personal thing that what others think is smart or dumb doesn't enter my equation very often. What you speak of doing to your rifle will not hurt it, if it's done properly, and so then end result should be a rifle that performs as well or better than it performs now. It's your rifle, your money and I'd stay focused upon your own opinion...
    Foolishness is a moral category, not an intellectual one.

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    About the only time I might get an action blue printed is if I am having it rebarreled at the same time. But, if the finished rifle is a medium or big bore I would pass on the blue printing.
    Lapping in the lugs is a very basic procedure and easy to do at home. It makes a person feel better but I've never seen it help accuracy.

    Anything that helps give you confidence in the rifle is a +.

    However, doing anything to a rifle can be a waste of money unless you first have a good base line of how it will shoot. Otherwise you really have no comparison to say if anything helped improve accuracy.

  10. #10
    Supporting Member Amigo Will's Avatar
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    Most say they never plan on selling their gun but if you do most thimes you will not get a return on money spent for the extra work and the muzzel brake may even take money away.
    Now left only to be a turd in the forrest and the circle will be complete.Use me as I have used you

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    I make a living with a Finnish M-39 Mosin Nagant.

    payed 200$ for it and have not modifyed it in any way whatsoever. I can do repeated headshots with the open sights out to 400m, with certainty, so , to me, the rifle is priceless.

    Was your rifle not accurate? or kick very badly?

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    "Blueprinting" is not lapping the lugs. Here, from Greg Tannel's webpage is what blueprinting a Remington action involves:

    "Single point re-machine action & bolt, Double sleeve bolt body, Bush firing pin hole & turn pin, Double pin recoil lug, Open lug for larger tenon, Lap lugs"

    This is some work, and runs about $800 to do, which is why he recommends starting with a quality action to begin with and go from there. A Lawton actions begin around $745 and are quite popular with the long range crowd.

    The muzzle noise enhancer was money down the toilet. A sinker in the stock would have helped significantly and won't destroy your and others' hearing.

    The barrel and chamber are what will make or break your rifle. You can buy a match reamer from PTG and have the barrel rechambered, only takes about one turn of the barrel to do, and get yourself a tight chamber that can still shoot factory ammo but will be significantly better than a factory hole.

    Once you get it back, see how it shoots before spending more money.
    Great spirits have always found violent opposition from mediocre minds. The latter cannot understand it when a man does not thoughtlessly submit to hereditary prejudices but honestly and courageously uses his intelligence. Albert Einstein

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    Nitroman:

    Would you care to elaborate on "A sinker in the stock".

    Thanks, if you do. (I know you're prepping 223 cases, and probably just takin a break from that.)

    Smitty of the North
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    Quote Originally Posted by Smitty of the North View Post
    Nitroman:

    Would you care to elaborate on "A sinker in the stock".

    Thanks, if you do. (I know you're prepping 223 cases, and probably just takin a break from that.)

    Smitty of the North
    I'm not Nitroman, but I think he's speaking of simply adding weight to the stock. I've used a couple of different methods and settled that pouring molten lead into a copper tube (1/2-3/4 in diameter) and cutting to length for weight is about the easiest option. Simply drill the buttstock under the pad for the correct size hole and insert the lead tube. I've done several laminated stocks for BR guns and found it works well and is easy to remove at a later date.
    Foolishness is a moral category, not an intellectual one.

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    Exactly.......
    Great spirits have always found violent opposition from mediocre minds. The latter cannot understand it when a man does not thoughtlessly submit to hereditary prejudices but honestly and courageously uses his intelligence. Albert Einstein

    Better living through chemistry (I'm a chemist)

    You can piddle with the puppies, or run with the wolves...

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    OK, I figgered it was something like that.

    But, I don't think it would be all that easy to remove a butt pad.

    Thanks.
    Smitty of the North
    Walk Slow, and Drink a Lotta Water.
    Has it ever occurred to you, that Nothing ever occurs to God? Adrien Rodgers.
    You can't out-give God.

  17. #17
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    Depends on if it is screwed on or glued on. You've got to add a lot of lead to the stock to make a "significant" reduction in recoil. To figure free recoil energy, use the following formula:
    A: Bullet weight in grains x velocity
    B: Powder charge in grains x 4,000
    C: Add result of A plus result of B
    D: Divide result of C by 225,400
    E: Multiply result of D by 32.2
    F: Divide result of E by weight of gun in pounds
    G: Square result of F and multiply by weight of gun in pounds
    H: Divide result of G by 64.4 = foot pounds of recoil

    Remember that foot pounds is only how "hard" it pushes, but does not tell you how "fast" it pushes, or the Velocity of the recoil, which is important as well.
    "A strong body makes the mind strong. As to the species of exercises, I advise the gun. While this gives moderate exercise to the body, it gives boldness, enterprise, and independence to the mind."

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by gunbugs View Post
    Depends on if it is screwed on or glued on. You've got to add a lot of lead to the stock to make a "significant" reduction in recoil.
    Doug knows of what he speaketh. I'd try from 12-18 oz if you hope to "feel" much effect--more is definitely better concerning recoil reduction. Easiest means of recoil reduction is choose a cartridge that uses less powder/less bullet mass. Animals will be just as dead and matched with appropriate bullets trajectories can be flatter than über magnums, all with less recoil.
    Foolishness is a moral category, not an intellectual one.

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    i bought the same rifle a few years ago for hunting. NIB it would shoot 1 MOA factory loads and i got some handloads to .5 MOA . Im sure it coulda been better since human error affected my accuracy. I wish i could reload some more im sure i could get it better tho.overall its a great gun and have done no work to it. the trigger is good as is but could use a tune and recoil is not bad depending on the load, but after about 40 rounds the shoulder would be sore. Its loud enuf as is i would hate to hear it with the muzzle brake.

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