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Thread: question regarding trip to Alaska

  1. #1

    Default question regarding trip to Alaska

    Hey guys
    After many years of planning it looks like I may be finnaly making my trip to Alaska. I would greatly appreciate any suggestions as to planning my week long trip. I would like to fly fish for as many species of fish as possible in 7 day period and I guess dolly warden would be my first choice (awesome colors). How many rods would you suggest and what weight? Which rivers would be more fly fisherman friendly but I'm prepared for combat fishing. I thank you in advance for any info.

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    Time of year and $ are things people are going to ask. All DIY or guided? What part(s) of AK?

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    Member Hunt&FishAK's Avatar
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    first of all when are you plannin to be up? sounds like mid-july would be your best bet if you want variety with a fly rod.....rainbows, dollies, grayling, king, red, pink, silver, and chum salmon should all be available as well at that time....as well as some saltwater species like halibut, cod, rockfish.....



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    Member AlaskaHippie's Avatar
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    Dependent upon your timeframe.

    3wt for Grayling

    5/6wt for Trout/Dollies/Pink Salmon

    7/8wt for Red/Silver Salmon

    10w for King Salmon

    Floating line with sink-tip would be preferential.

    If you have pack rods, all the better for accessing water with multiple varieties and not having your hands full of rods.

    Flesh out your plans and intentions and I am certain folks here can help steer you in the proper direction(s).
    “Life has become immeasurably better since I have been forced to stop taking it seriously.” ― H.S.T.
    "Character is how you treat those who can do nothing for you."

  5. #5

    Default cool

    Sorry for not being more specific. I guess July would be the date and I'm debating between renting camper and staying in motels....I would like to do 7 days of fishing and was considering heading south toward Homer but I'm open to suggestions. I would rather stuck to the rivers not really interested in deep sea . Prefer to do it on my own but a guide who can make it a cool experience is not out of the question. I just want to see Alaska and get a taste of as many species as possible. Fly rod is mine weapon of choice but if I have to use spinner so be it.

  6. #6

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    Most people i know up here have two go-to rods

    5 wt for trout, grayling etc
    8 wt for Steelhead, Salmon etc.

    5 might be a bit much for small trout/Grayling but up here you always have a good chance of catching that lunker that gives a 5 a good workout.

    8 might be a bit small for some salmon and big for others. Its just a good middle ground. Overall an 8 seems to be perfect for 3 of the five salmon species and when you know you are going to catch big trout. Kings will stress it out and an 8wt is a bit much for pinks ( I use my 5 wt for pinks, its a bit on the light side though)

    I have those two and it covers almost all my fishing. Some people i know have 4s, 7s and 9s but that is just personal preference. If you like to be under-weighted pick a 4 and 7, over-weighted pick a 5 and 9. I knew one guy took a 3 for dollies and broke it on the first fish. I wouldnt go less than a 4 up here.

  7. #7

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    should I had north from Anchorage or stick with south/homer area?

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    Go to Kodiak in September!
    You can get silvers, dollies, and maybe a bow. If you come in Late August, just add pinks to that and maybe a chum.

    You wont get to see as much but you will get to fish more.

    Then again, don't come to Kodiak, there are no fish here :-)

  9. #9

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    September is too cold for me - I'm from FL and i don't want to miss fall mullet run. Seriously I dont need to catch 40 fish a day I'm more into the whole experience thing. I'm just trying to figure out how to avoid shoulder to shoulder fishing even if that means driving extra 100 miles and catching fewer fish:-)

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    Member fullbush's Avatar
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    The Susitna valley offers more choices than south toward Homer IMO. Like hunt&fishak said all 5 species of salmon, trout dollies and grayling. Best of all you wOnt deal w/ the crowds and traffic. Keep it simple and bring a 6 weight w/ 2 spools 1 floating and 1 sinking. If you tie intO some kings then rip down to wasilla and buy a 10 wt lamaglass. If you're wealthy bring the gamete like hippie said.





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    Member kenaibow fan's Avatar
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    Like FB said you need to head north then, the only way your not going to get shoulder to shoulder is if you have a boat or a guide any more down south and that isn't a garuntee, I would think about going north, and hit all the places from Willow to Fairbanks. But if you really like Dolley's you need to go to Nome and fish them in the fall, biggest size dollies in the state and the best color.

    For rods I would bring a 5 for grayling, 6 for bows, and the 9 for salmon.

    Also just some thing to threw out there, this is a big state, you might want to spend more then 7 days here fishing, it will take you forever to get any where up here. And please keep in mind that if you are holding up more then 5 cars, pull over, it is the law and people get really irritated at people from out of state for holding every one up because there is a lot of cool things to look at.

    Enjoy your trip, and post pics when your done.

  12. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by fullbush View Post
    The Susitna valley offers more choices than south toward Homer IMO. Like hunt&fishak said all 5 species of salmon, trout dollies and grayling. Best of all you wOnt deal w/ the crowds and traffic. Keep it simple and bring a 6 weight w/ 2 spools 1 floating and 1 sinking. If you tie intO some kings then rip down to wasilla and buy a 10 wt lamaglass. If you're wealthy bring the gamete like hippie said.
    Are you talking Susitna river? Any decent lodges you could recommend?

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    Member AlaskaHippie's Avatar
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    A 4 or 5 wt for grayling?

    Interesting, all these years and remote rivers, and landing 20" + grayling on a 3wt....Never knew I was so under gunned....
    “Life has become immeasurably better since I have been forced to stop taking it seriously.” ― H.S.T.
    "Character is how you treat those who can do nothing for you."

  14. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by AlaskaHippie View Post
    A 4 or 5 wt for grayling?

    Interesting, all these years and remote rivers, and landing 20" + grayling on a 3wt....Never knew I was so under gunned....
    I landed few decent tarpon on 6 wt. As long as you have enough line and room to run. By the way if any of you guys ever plan to come to SE florida I'll more than happy to point you in the right direction depending what you want to catch.

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    Quote Originally Posted by mikezm View Post
    I landed few decent tarpon on 6 wt. As long as you have enough line and room to run. By the way if any of you guys ever plan to come to SE florida I'll more than happy to point you in the right direction depending what you want to catch.
    I spent 3 months tromping around the Keys/Marco Island area a few years back. Nice waters you have down there. If you can bag a Tarpon on a 6wt, you'll do fine with 3wt for grayling. My go to rod for Sockeye and Silvers is a 7wt, and if the waters and (lack of) crowds allow, a 6wt is a good time as well. Fishing, like any other pursuit, should be a constant challenge to improve ones abilities. Anyone can land a crappie with a telephone pole.

    As to your trip, the Matanuska/Susitna drainages, as mentioned previously are less crowded. I live in that region. But if you are looking for mountain vistas and trophy quality fishing South would be my choice (Not to say the same cannot be had to the North, but the options are pretty good South as well).

    As to "Lodges" up North, Sheep Creek Lodge comes to mind. However, if you really want to get down and dirty and see Alaska, why not bring a tent and sleeping bag? It will open up a TON of more viable fishing opportunities.
    “Life has become immeasurably better since I have been forced to stop taking it seriously.” ― H.S.T.
    "Character is how you treat those who can do nothing for you."

  16. #16

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    Well I was considering that option (tent) but two buddies I will travel with are too old to handle that also last time I was considering camping in Yellowstone somebody got killed within like 48 hrs by a bear. I may be slow but I can recognize message from higher authority: Don't camp where there is healthy population of grizzly bears . I think Alaska have a quite healthy population:-)
    Sooo it's even camper or lodge.

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    Member AlaskaHippie's Avatar
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    Your odds of getting hit on the highway TO the river far exceed the odds of being mauled by a bear. Just sayin'.

    Camper rentals aren't a bad option, and definitely get you closer to the river(s).

    Speaking of camping near healthy populations of bears....







    It ain't all that bad....
    “Life has become immeasurably better since I have been forced to stop taking it seriously.” ― H.S.T.
    "Character is how you treat those who can do nothing for you."

  18. #18

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    Dude if that would be me I would need a diaper change. Is this mama bear with babies? If I ever get that close to the bear please tell my wife I loved her....

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    Quote Originally Posted by AlaskaHippie View Post
    A 4 or 5 wt for grayling?

    Interesting, all these years and remote rivers, and landing 20" + grayling on a 3wt....Never knew I was so under gunned....
    Number one reason that a 3 wt is impracticle for grayling is that typically, not always there are salmon and trout in the same waters that would really leave you undergunned if you hooked one.

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    Quote Originally Posted by TYNMON View Post
    Number one reason that a 3 wt is impracticle for grayling is that typically, not always there are salmon and trout in the same waters that would really leave you undergunned if you hooked one.

    We land grayling in rather significant numbers and size every year. Can't recall every having to compete with Salmon trying to sip a mosquito pattern, and as to the trout, the very rare incidence of having them going for said fly have always ended with the fly rod still intact (it's called a tippet).

    Maybe you're doing something wrong?
    “Life has become immeasurably better since I have been forced to stop taking it seriously.” ― H.S.T.
    "Character is how you treat those who can do nothing for you."

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