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Thread: 12 HP Copperhead Cold Start

  1. #1
    Member mainer_in_ak's Avatar
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    Default 12 HP Copperhead Cold Start

    Was Reading 17 degrees on the thermometer when I fired the motor up. I had to pull it out of storage to show someone, and never winterized it, still have "re-fogged" it.



    http://youtu.be/542Agj9rpwY

  2. #2

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    Impressive, however not something I would recommend doing often...or ever unless it was an emergency. Cold starts on any internal combustion engine can have negative results. Most sudden death/mechanical failures I have seen were during cold starts.
    "96% of all Internet Quotes are suspect and the remaining 4% are fiction."
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    Member mainer_in_ak's Avatar
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    It's the same motor used in Husqvarna Snow blowers, so It should be ok?

    Same 414 cc. motor in the largest snowblower they make:

    I think it's badged "storm force" or something like that I think.

    http://www.husqvarna.com/us/homeowner/products/snow-throwers/1830exlt/#specifications



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    Not sure what the point of this commercial is.

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    Member JOAT's Avatar
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    You can have the same motor setup differently between a summer and winter application. Fuel/air jetting is probably different and the dense, cold winter air running into a motor tuned for warm summer air is going to burn lean, which, given the right set of circumstances and a wisp of luck from Murphy, could cause motor damage.
    Winter is Coming...

    Go GeocacheAlaska!

  6. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rick View Post
    Not sure what the point of this commercial is.
    Someone demonstrating that a certain piece of equipment worked well under a certain condition. Good information to know if someone were looking at investing in that type of equipment.

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    anchskier ... The promotional video demonstrates that the LCT motor starts; it doesn't demonstrate that the Copperhead operates under the stated conditions. Put the canoe in the water @ +17 and demonstrate how well the Copperhead works. Otherwise, it's fluff.

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    Rick please keep any personal problems you have from affecting these discussions. Thank you.

  9. #9
    Supporting Member Amigo Will's Avatar
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    Cold can be tuff for sure but that motor is as strong as the motors on ice racing motorcycles and they get cold starts many times a day during racing season and often much colder temps.
    Now left only to be a turd in the forrest and the circle will be complete.Use me as I have used you

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    I don't plug my car in until about 10 below and at work I can't plug it in so it has to start at what ever the temp is after sitting for a 12 hr night shift. I'm not seeing why 17 degrees or even 17 below should be any problem. What am I missing here?
    Having the motor start is a very important part of having a Copperhead do what it's supposed to for those wondering what importance starting the motor is.

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    Member mainer_in_ak's Avatar
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    During my very short moose hunting season up north, I woke up to ice on the puddles. The motor still started first pull. Nothing but a big ole lawn mower engine, not too much involved here (simple design). It won't run lean in the cold as I've checked the plug after every long trip. The motor likes a standard plug in the hot summer months, and a hotter iridium plug in the cold months. Some four strokes are sluggish in the cold, like my old Tohatsu 9.8. I had to let her warm up for about 10 minutes before it would stop dying when you put a load on the motor. sometimes the Tohatus was touchy with the first start, you had to be real careful with the throttle, and keep it just above idle for a few minutes before letting it idle around 1,000 rpm's. Not the case with this motor, a few seconds at half choke, and about two minutes of idling and you're good to go. Two minutes aren't required but I give it the courtesy for things to warm up.

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    Quote Originally Posted by tailwind View Post
    Rick please keep any personal problems you have from affecting these discussions. Thank you.

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    Check your inbox, FamilyMan.

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