Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 35

Thread: Hunter shot in SE

  1. #1
    Member Skookumchuck's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Juneau
    Posts
    375

    Unhappy Hunter shot in SE

    http://juneauempire.com/local/2011-1...miralty-island


    Yikes! Astounding how dumb some people can be. From what I heard the shot went through his liver and ribs. Hope he makes it out ok and finds some new hunting pals.
    Nice Marmot.

  2. #2
    Member AKDoug's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Talkeetna
    Posts
    5,714

    Default

    As a life long Alaskan hunter with very little experience hunting in the Lower 48 I was initially hesitant about the whole hunter orange thing. I resisted right through my own hunter safety class I took with my oldest daughter. I eventually became an instructor and I'm now a believer. I still don't wear it every time, but it definately has it's place. As the population in Alaska grows, so will the hunting population. With this growth will come inexperienced hunters (and some stupid experienced hunters). I see myself and my children wearing hunter orange much more often in the future. To my youngest daughter's credit, she DEMANDED that as a minimum I would pack her hunter orange hat on our recent S.E. deer hunt. She was completely correct and I'm glad she wore that hat.

    Bunny Boots and Bearcats: Utility Sled Mayhem

  3. #3
    Member fishingyoda's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Palmer
    Posts
    538

    Default

    It's the simple principle pounded into every hunter safety class know what you are shooting at what's in front of it and what's behind it. These idiots see movement shoot at the movement and then say I thought it was a deer. There's no common sense in what they do. I've never been so tempted to shoot something that I just shoot at movement. For one how do you figure your making a good clean kill shot, do you even know if it's a buck or doe? I just don't get how this happens.

  4. #4
    Member
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Juneau
    Posts
    1,098

    Default

    Beyond the brush busting that went on, you need to establish boundaries for each person's hunting area. If you aren't hunting together there needs to be a distinct separation. If a pard and I split up, it's very clear. You hunt on that side of the ridge/stream/cove..... I'll hunt the other. Don't plan to have overlaps in your spots.
    I'd agree with you, but then we'd both be wrong.

  5. #5
    Supporting Member Amigo Will's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Wrangell
    Posts
    7,602

    Default

    They should never use the word accident in shootings as its always negligent and should be tried as such.
    Now left only to be a turd in the forrest and the circle will be complete.Use me as I have used you

  6. #6

    Default

    That sucks. Completely avoidable.

    I ran into a guy about a week ago, up on a ridge top. He was boning out a buck. The orange cap he had up on a tree was great to immediately notify me that a guy was down cutting on the big buck that was laying on the ground. And believe me, it was the last place I'd ever expect to run into another hunter. I blew on my call a few times to alert him until we made eye contact. Once we waved to confirm contact, I went down to talk to him to see if he had a partner in the area hunting. He informed me where his partner was, and we went the opposite direction. I'm now carrying orange with me to hang on a tree when I have a buck down and I'm boning him out so some trigger happy hunter doesn't start shooting at my dead buck thinking it's a bedded buck.

  7. #7

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by 270ti View Post
    That sucks. Completely avoidable.

    I ran into a guy about a week ago, up on a ridge top. He was boning out a buck. The orange cap he had up on a tree was great to immediately notify me that a guy was down cutting on the big buck that was laying on the ground. And believe me, it was the last place I'd ever expect to run into another hunter. I blew on my call a few times to alert him until we made eye contact. Once we waved to confirm contact, I went down to talk to him to see if he had a partner in the area hunting. He informed me where his partner was, and we went the opposite direction. I'm now carrying orange with me to hang on a tree when I have a buck down and I'm boning him out so some trigger happy hunter doesn't start shooting at my dead buck thinking it's a bedded buck.
    Although I think I have somehow gotten out of the practice the last couple of years (good reminder to myself), we used to make a point to tie lots of flagging on the points of caribou and moose antlers when we would be carrying them or having them in the boats just so someone couldn't mistake them for a live animal.

  8. #8
    Member fullkurl's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Alaska/Idaho
    Posts
    2,162

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by anchskier View Post
    Although I think I have somehow gotten out of the practice the last couple of years (good reminder to myself), we used to make a point to tie lots of flagging on the points of caribou and moose antlers when we would be carrying them or having them in the boats just so someone couldn't mistake them for a live animal.
    ........Always!!!
    Proud to be an American!

  9. #9
    Member Bighorse's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Ketchikan, Alaska
    Posts
    2,032

    Default

    I hung my hunter orange jacket over the racks down in WA state while hunting blacktails. I was honestly spooked while doing my field work hunting in those open logging units in Western Washington. You never knew what yahoo was running those roads looking for a shot.

    Here in SE I don't worry about it as much. Not a bad idea to use some flagging tape or something obviously bright and human.

    I hope that victim recovers well.

  10. #10

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Bighorse View Post
    I hung my hunter orange jacket over the racks down in WA state while hunting blacktails. I was honestly spooked while doing my field work hunting in those open logging units in Western Washington. You never knew what yahoo was running those roads looking for a shot.

    Here in SE I don't worry about it as much. Not a bad idea to use some flagging tape or something obviously bright and human.

    I hope that victim recovers well.
    I have hunted elk down in Western Washington a couple of times in the logging areas. No way will you ever see me out there during rifle season. It's archery season only. Too many nutcases running around in a small area taking potshots at noises.

  11. #11
    Member Smokey's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Central Illinois
    Posts
    3,334

    Default

    Over 41 years of whitetail hunting in IL. with an orange hat and vest required, I have gotten used to it. It has never scared any game off that I was hunting including many animals in Canada like bears, moose, caribou etc - so its much more a psycological hurtle to overcome than anything I think. I know on more occasions than I can count, it has helped me spot hunters and been useful. There are many reasons, other than the fear of getting shot, that seem valid to me to wear it - especially in remote countryside hunting. You may get hurt and a rescue team could much more easily find you, or perhaps another hunter in need of help may spot someone with orange on and give them a chance to make a much needed contact? It also can serve to ID a hunter in an area you, or they, were intending to hunt and you can change your plans instead of wasting a day of unwanted competition...
    Other than feeling a bit foolish, after being taught how important it is to be stealthy when hunting, it would seem to be a very valuable piece of common sense gear.
    When asked what state I live in I say "The State of Confusion", better known as IL....

  12. #12
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    2,086

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Smokey View Post
    It has never scared any game off that I was hunting including many animals in Canada like bears, moose, caribou etc - so its much more a psycological hurtle to overcome than anything I think.
    Other than feeling a bit foolish, after being taught how important it is to be stealthy when hunting, it would seem to be a very valuable piece of common sense gear.
    More people waste money on camouflage than any other piece of hunting equipment. Animals see you with their noses and ears way more than their eyes. As long as you keep a low profile It doesn't much matter what you are wearing.
    An opinion should be the result of thought, not a substitute for it.
    - Jef Mallett

  13. #13
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Montana
    Posts
    205

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by twodux View Post
    More people waste money on camouflage than any other piece of hunting equipment. Animals see you with their noses and ears way more than their eyes. As long as you keep a low profile It doesn't much matter what you are wearing.
    +100 on that!! Camo wasn't necessary when people were killing game years ago and now "they" have us believing its necessary. Funny to hear people argue about which camo they like most as if its a huge deal. Admittedly it's nice to have decent camo for archery.

    An orange hat and vest always goes on my kids when we hunt together. I never hunt with a round in the chamber when I'm hunting with someone, I'd rather miss an opportunity than have an accident. I also carry an extra orange vest to hang on my pack/horns/hide in addition to the one I'm wearing. God have mercy on all of us to avoid shooting someone or being shot.

  14. #14

    Default

    Like the guy said, "you just can't fix stupid". I hate stories like this. I am praying for his recovery.

  15. #15
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    SwampView AK, Overlooking Mt. Mckinley and Points Beyond.
    Posts
    8,816

    Default

    Amigo is right.

    Too many people see deer, or other game, or think they do, and aim at it. They give no thought as to where on the animal the bullet is gonna hit.

    If they did, they would know it, when it ain't what they thought it was.

    That's not an accident, it negligence, and criminal behavior.

    Smitty of the North
    Walk Slow, and Drink a Lotta Water.
    Has it ever occurred to you, that Nothing ever occurs to God? Adrien Rodgers.
    You can't out-give God.

  16. #16
    Member tboehm's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Soldotna AK
    Posts
    2,408

    Default

    I've never understood stupidity. Hope the young man recovers quickly.
    Semper Fi and God Bless

  17. #17
    Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Houston Alaska
    Posts
    36

    Default

    skookumchuck = strong water or salt water?

  18. #18
    Member fullkurl's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Alaska/Idaho
    Posts
    2,162

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Smitty of the North View Post
    Amigo is right.

    Too many people see deer, or other game, or think they do, and aim at it. They give no thought as to where on the animal the bullet is gonna hit.

    If they did, they would know it, when it ain't what they thought it was.

    That's not an accident, it negligence, and criminal behavior.

    Smitty of the North
    +1...charges should be filed.
    Tired of reading about hunters shooting hunters.
    Proud to be an American!

  19. #19
    Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Juneau
    Posts
    459

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by fishingyoda View Post
    It's the simple principle pounded into every hunter safety class know what you are shooting at what's in front of it and what's behind it. These idiots see movement shoot at the movement and then say I thought it was a deer. There's no common sense in what they do. I've never been so tempted to shoot something that I just shoot at movement. For one how do you figure your making a good clean kill shot, do you even know if it's a buck or doe? I just don't get how this happens.
    How do I give this guy +100?

  20. #20
    New member
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Juneau, Alaska, United States
    Posts
    5

    Default

    In support of orange hats, I just got back from a hunt on Admiralty Island. I came home with 2 nice bucks and a doe. All of which I shot with my orange hat on. My partner and I wear them to keep track of each other in the thick brush and timber of the SE AK terrain.
    Camo hunting clothing is designed to catch the consumer's eye, not to conceal oneself from game. Every time I see a hunter from a distance with camo on, it looks like they are wearing black clothing.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •