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Thread: questions on break in procedure for 2011 yamaha bravo 250

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    Default questions on break in procedure for 2011 yamaha bravo 250

    I have a brand new bravo 250 and i was gonna start it up and get it broke in. I gotta run pre mix 50:1 gas for the break in period but i forgot if im supposed to leave the oil injection tank empty for the break in period. I would think that i got to leave it empty since im already running 50:1 gas oil in it but i was wondering if anyone knew for sure, mabe i'll wait to talk to a mechanic in the morning.

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    Moderator LuJon's Avatar
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    I believe that the 50:1 is in addition to the oil injection. Did it come with an owners manual? Are the break in procedures not in it?

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    Member SusitnaAk's Avatar
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    Yes.. with the oil, tank full ..Thats the idea, is to double the oil in the motor as it wears in..Try not to run in steady rpms either, up down though the power band, Buy couple extra plugs for it.. carry with, in case foul one out..

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    Read your manual. It should say to avoid extended full throttle. Vary your RPMs. Double oil as Susitna said, so injection PLUS pre-mix. Avoid powder busting and run the trails at first to keep it from overheating. Your manual will spell it out and your warranty will require you to follow those instructions.

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    Member AKDoug's Avatar
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    The 50:1 in the tank is mostly for just in case you get an air bubble in the line from the oil tank down to the engine. Once you run a tank of fuel the line will be bubble free and you will be safe to just run the injection tank. Mr. Pid's advice above is currect for the rest of it.

    With all that being said, I have seen multiple dealer demo sleds get run full banana from the first day with no break-in and they ran great for years.
    Bunny Boots and Bearcats: Utility Sled Mayhem

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    sounds like someone bought a demo)

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    The way that i was tought by most all the people who know way more than i do like snow machine reps and macanics and 3 time winners of the iron dog and its the way that i have broken in every new fan cooled snowmachine i have owend is..
    Double the oil and before i even ride it i put it on a stand where i can start it and warm it up I get it warm not to hot and then turn it off and let it cool. i do it 4 times. Then when you run it you dont want to run it with the throttle in the same position for to long.
    I think what everything everyone already said is 100 percent correct the only other thing i do is warm it up and cool it off 4 times before i ride it. heating and cooling dose a lot for breaking it in. Just my 2 cents.
    If the oil tank is emty it wont run it has a cencer that wont let it......

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    Member AKDoug's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ALASKANRMK View Post
    sounds like someone bought a demo)
    Yep. A demo 4 stroke. I've seen sleds babied from the beginning roll over and die at 2000 miles, and sleds that were hammered from day 1 like a demo go 5000 trouble free miles. A vast majority of burn downs are opperator error not related to break in procedures. Failures to properly warm up a sled, bad jetting, forgetting oil, bad fuel, poor maint...etc.

    You can get an amazing amount of different advice from very qualified people. Indy Dan at Indy Specialty, who does fantastic Polaris work down in the states, doesn't consider break-in to be a big deal and neither do most dealer mechanics I've been around.

    2-stroke chainsaws go full banana from day 1, so do weed-eaters and other garden equipment. Cars, four-wheelers, trucks, heavy equipment, are all run hard right from the start.

    I still haven't figured out why we are so worried about 2-stroke sleds.

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    Moderator LuJon's Avatar
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    Sleds, boat motors, sheep hunting boots and rifle barrels seem to all have a massive amount of differing views on if/when/how breakin should be done!

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    In concert with the added oil most 2-stroke manufacturers prescribe for the first tank, I break a new sled in the same way I break-in a new belt. I usually take things a little easy on any new sled so I can get to know it anyway. Very few guys will pull a brand new sled out of a trailer and ride it at 100%. Too many little things to learn. BUT, it's easier to ride a Bravo at 100% than some fire-breating race sled, so factor that in. The last new sled I broke in was an etec SkiDoo in a couple of feet of new snow. After the first 25 miles or so there was little choice but to tape it and go. So far so good. But that's a liquid cooled engine. Air cooled sleds require more heat management than anything else. In any engine ring seating requires high cylinder pressure. You need to work it, just work it to sensible limits and don't cook it. 4 strokes require less attention. Still, you need to break in the new belt. Belts ain't cheap these days and with a little care, especially at break in, they last a really long time.

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