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Thread: Which Sled for me?

  1. #1
    Member
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    Sep 2007
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    Default Which Sled for me?

    I have around $4000 to spend on a sno machine but not really sure what to look for. I live at the base of Hatchers in Fish Hook and most of my riding will be going towards Sutton with a very little on the side of the mountain but not much at all. Most of it will be bushwacking and boondocking and just general exploring and camping. I would love to have an Expedition but for 4k I probably wont get a very good one. Had a Indy 500 but the snow is too deep here I think. Sounds like a long track is needed also and I dont really need a go fast machine. Will eventually get two down the road. Just wondering what some of you have to say and what works for you. Any advice would be really helpful and appreciated! Thanks

  2. #2
    Moderator LuJon's Avatar
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    Default

    There are some decent trails out that way. I ride my 96 two up cougar 550 around there with no problems. Going up the mountain is a blast no matter where you are out there so an early skidoo rev 600 would be a good choice but a cheap 2000-2004 mountain cat with a 144" track will get you most anywhere you would want to go. AC sells a good hitch kit for the mountain cat chassis which will let you tow a sled if needed.

  3. #3
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    Bought a 96 Bearcat and have had a ball on it so far. Not the greatest suspension but it is fine for me and in pretty good shape although it does need a seat cover. Does pretty good in the deep snow but a little hard
    to turn.

  4. #4
    Supporting Member Old John's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stormy View Post
    Bought a 96 Bearcat and have had a ball on it so far. Not the greatest suspension but it is fine for me and in pretty good shape although it does need a seat cover. Does pretty good in the deep snow but a little hard
    to turn.
    I bought a 98 Bearcat (used) a few years ago and it is the most comfortable riding snowmachine we have ever ridden... of course we do most all of our riding on the rivers...

  5. #5
    Premium Member bmunsell's Avatar
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    May 2007
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    Wasilla, behind 3 Bears on the Palmer Wasilla Hwy
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    I saw a used bearcat sitting on the ditch bank about 3 blocks behind the Mattress Ranch on the Palmer/Wasilla Hwy on Friday. Don't know what year but looked like a nice machine for $2500 373-3086 was the number.

  6. #6
    Member mainer_in_ak's Avatar
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    clutches that engage tightly at a very low rpm are very important to me. There's a big difference in the clutching of a utility sled, and a machine for touring, or even a machine for powder and climbing. I've heard of guys switching to bearcat clutches on a multitude of machines to get the low end engagement.

    About the most versatile used machine I've seen in person, was a guy with an older 550 bearcat (I think it was a 2000 model). He had replaced the track with a 1.75 in. paddle track and I believe it had studs too. That was one rippin machine for doing just about everything. He even had really wide skis on the front. The plastic skis looked to be about 10" wide. The machine was relatively light, and had the gearing/clutching to pull anything he wanted.

  7. #7
    Member AKDoug's Avatar
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    The Bearcat secondary clutch gets it's advantage through diameter. More leverage/lower gearing at the engagement due to it's larger diameter. Everything else can be changed by changing the helix and springs. The larger diameter (more mass) also runs cooler which was the primary reason many Cat guys switched to the Bearcat clutch before the M-sleds.

    You can adjust clutches to engage at a lower RPM by changing weights and spring rates in the primary clutch and the helix and spring in the secondary. You can also change how the clutch shifts changing the profile of the primary clutch weights. The final step is gearing.

    By adding paddle tracks you can often mess the whole thing up since you've usually increased rotating mass and drag. Lots to think of.

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