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Thread: Article from The Veterinary Journal about OFA

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    Default Article from The Veterinary Journal about OFA

    "How the Orthopedic Foundation for Animals (OFA) is Tackling Inherited Disorder in the USA : Using Hip and Elbow Dysplasia as Examples" - http://www.offa.org/pdf/keller_dziuk...et_journal.pdf

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    Thank you, M'am!

    Jim

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    I'm going to need more than one beer to wade through that to make sense of it. Thanks GF, you do all of us good everytime you send this stuff out. Great work!
    Question: Maybe it is in the report, but years back I saw/heard/read that in all of the x-rays completed, there had been no defined reduction of hip issues related to dysplasia. I personally think the idea of x-rays and desire to eliminate dysplasia is sound, but has there been definite headway made? Any more good reading to that end?
    Thanks again Karen,
    ARR

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    You're welcome! Haven't had time to "digest" the article yet, but OFA has a lot of information & references to journal articles at http://www.offa.org/education.html I also recall reading somewhere, and several years ago, that there had been no reduction in dysplasia too. Just can't remember where. Found an article from 1985 in the Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association titled "Trends in hip dysplasia control: Analysis of radiographs submitted to the Orthopedic Foundation for Animals, Inc., 1974 to 1984". From a quick glance, it appears some breeds decreased and some increased.

    Also found this at http://www.petplace.com/dogs/hip-dys...ofa/page1.aspx

    "Hip dysplasia is typically thought of as a large-breed dog illness. German shepherds, Labrador retrievers, golden retrievers and Rottweilers are some of the more commonly affected breeds. Over time and through the diligence of breeders, the incidence of hip dysplasia in these breeds has been reduced. For example, in 1974, 19 percent of Labrador x-rays were diagnosed with hip dysplasia. In 2000, only 12 percent were dysplastic. In addition to reducing the incidence, the number of x-rays submitted to OFA has continued to increase. In 1974, 713 Labrador x-rays were submitted, and 10,379 were submitted in the year 2000.

    Currently, the risk of developing hip dysplasia in German shepherds is 19 percent, in Labrador retrievers 13 percent, in golden retrievers 21 percent and in Rottweilers 21 percent. Of the common large breed dogs, the St. Bernard (47 percent), bloodhound (26 percent), bullmastiff (25 percent), Newfoundland (22 percent) and Chesapeake Bay retriever (22 percent) have the highest incidence of hip dysplasia. Of the smaller dogs, the pug (60 percent) and bulldog (73 percent) have the highest incidence."


    Karen

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    Here's one more article abstract from: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1604774 I can't find the actual article online. --Karen

    Veterinary Clinics of North America. Small Animal Practice 1992 May;22(3):579-593.

    Role of the Orthopedic Foundation for Animals in the control of canine hip dysplasia.

    Corley EA.

    Source: Orthopedic Foundation for Animals, Columbia, Missouri.

    Abstract

    The objectives of the Dysplasia Control Registry, the procedure for submitting radiographs, and the radiographic evaluation process are described. The results from the radiographic evaluation of 321,183 dogs are reported by hip phenotypic ratings and breed frequency of canine hip dysplasia. Breeds at risk are documented. Comparison of dogs born between 1981 and 1988 with those born between 1972 and 1980 demonstrated that the frequency of canine hip dysplasia was reduced in 79% of breeds, and the frequency of excellent hips was increased in 88% of the breeds. Reliability of preliminary hip evaluations of dogs under 24 months of age is reported to vary by breed, and the results of 9,161 preliminary evaluations are documented.

    PMID:1604774 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

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