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Thread: whats a good guide

  1. #1
    Member Bent fin's Avatar
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    Default whats a good guide

    besides catching a buch of fish. make my day.

  2. #2
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    some one who tries their best to meet or beat your expectations. I think most importantly, some one you feel a friendship with.

  3. #3
    Member Rick P's Avatar
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    OK cant resist any longer a guide should be/have
    1) Knowlagable not just about fish but the areas flura and fauna and history in general
    2) Willing to teach
    3) Able to make the client feel good about almost every fish, must have said " Look at the color in that little dandy" or "you played that one perfectly" or "The drift that fish rose for was perfect" a thousand times over the years.
    4) Relieable if ya tell a client to meet ya at 5:30 the guide had better be there at 5:00 and have everything ready for the day.
    5) A freindly dispossition no matter how badly a guide would like to drownd a client the client should feel he's fishing with a old freind.
    6) Well orgainized nothing worse than steping into a boat and having to kick gear out of the way to get to a seat.
    7) Clean and well rested. A guide who dose'nt look like he left the bar until 1 hour before he met up with you dose'nt instill confidance.
    8) Realistic if the runs have sucked do to high water or other factors don't tell the clients "oh ya we'll limit out in no time flat"
    9) Patceint espeacially with newbee's yelling or getting visably flustered with a client is not allowed!
    10) A sense of hummor a bad day can turn into the trip of a lifetime with the right attitued.
    11) Above all saftey minded!

    Ya asked for it
    Rick P

  4. #4
    Member Bent fin's Avatar
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    nice job rick. a good friendy reminder befor all the guide begin there season up in the greatest place on earth.i just didnt wont to say it.

  5. #5
    Member Rick P's Avatar
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    Thanks bent fin I'm off the water for a while but that's pretty much the list I used to give assistant guides

  6. #6

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    Here are my thoughts based on personal expierences within the last two years...

    When you pull up to a hole and there are a number of tents and campers on the banks move along down stream to another hole. DON'T fish just out of lure range, clean your fish, and LEAVE the waste on the banks to chum in the local bear population.

    Don't stop the fishing boat everytime a customer gets a snag and remind the customer how much those lures cost and grab the pole from them and stop everyone from fishing. If your business can't afford minor loss and your tack is less than 'friendly' you shouldn't be in business...remember that word of mouth is the best (and worse) advertisment a guide can have.

  7. #7
    Member ak_powder_monkey's Avatar
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    When I guided I always tried to keep a smile on my face and switch things up a lot, make sure things were going right and offer a bit of advice but not too much advice. I also tried hard to get clients into fish. I have like all of the guides I have ever used (6 total 2 halibut, 2 hawaii, 1 maine and 1 in Washington State) they all had very laid back attitudes and put me on the fish and let me pick their brains so I could become a better fisherman.
    I choose to fly fish, not because its easy, but because its hard.

  8. #8

    Default On time

    1.On time.
    2.Clean boat.
    3.Good deck hands if applicable
    4.Good person. Doesn't embarrase his clients by being a "know-it-all", showing up other fishermen or guides, or being too aggressive
    5.Good stories
    6.Good gear
    7.Takes an occasional shower and shave
    Hike faster. I hear banjo music.

  9. #9
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    They should be able to put the client on lots of fish. Most clients can take nature tours, fish in crowded areas, and not catch fish by themselves, they hire a guide to catch fish.

  10. #10
    Member Stickle Back's Avatar
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    You hire a guide to have a good time and have a Good chance to catch good fish.

    -Ben

  11. #11
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    No, I don't. I don't have to hire a guide for a good time, there are other professionals for that, and they are cheaper. If I hired a fishing guide it would be to catch fish. I could sit on the bank with a 6 pack and have a good time.

  12. #12

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    Alot of good points have been made already so I'll just add this, I know some guides that are truelly awesome fisherman but are jerks (putting it nicely) I also know guides that have great people skills but just don't seem to have it when it comes to consistantly putting fish in the box. The best guides (IMO) are those who can combine these traits, consistantly produce and have good people skills.

  13. #13
    Member dwhunter's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stickle Back View Post
    You hire a guide to have a good time and have a Good chance to catch good fish.

    -Ben

    When you say good chance I am hoping you mean you will move or do whatever to do all you can to get clients on fish as I am sure you do. I have had a few over the years in AK and other places that were more than content staying in the same general area all day to catch no fish.

    At the same time I have had great guides that would do what it took to get us fish and if it took moving 10 times so be it. Guides are paid for their local knowledge and should have a VERY reasonable idea where fish can be located and I think if the guide is obviously trying HARD everyone will be happy.


    Doug

  14. #14
    Member Stickle Back's Avatar
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    Of course a good guide will try hard. That doesn't necassarily mean move though. In fact in some situations I would rather "bulldog" a spot, meaning not move because I believe the fish will come. But if the guide puts you on a spot and you miss 3 good pole bending bites then it would be hard to blame the guide for the amout of fish that were caught.
    When you fish for halibut in Seward your guide can put you on a ferocious chicken bite or can swing for the fense and take you to a spot that has a good chance of catching a few big ones and than going to a chicken hole. When I say few I mean few,
    Big fish do not get big being stupied, chances are if you miss the bite the fish will go away, this is not always the case but usually is in my experiance.
    When you go to the sportsman show next weekend look at the pictures that people have in their booths. Most will be from years and years of fishing showing only the best catches. The best way to see if a guide is "successful" is to look at their day to day catches and see if their consistency is good on catching big fish.
    Also remember that when looking at pics with big fish count how many big ones there are (60 on up) those were probably caught at one spot and the rest at a chicken hole. So if your looking at a boat with 10 people and you see 4 nice fish chances are for most of the day there were 4 fish caught and the rest were at a chicken hole, once again not always the case just what I have expericanced.
    Don't get me wrong when I used to go on charters I was the biggest Hog hunter there was so I know what is expected and as a guide I attempt to provide that kind of service everyday. Sometimes however no matter how hard a guide tries the fish will outsmart them.

    -Ben

  15. #15
    Member Rick P's Avatar
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    If your hiring a guide for guaranteed fish you went to the wrong guy. The guy you want is called a fishmonger. Guides are not Gods they will fail from time to time that's why there called fishing guides and not fishmongers.

  16. #16

    Default Good ones and bad ones

    Over a lifetime of fishing I have had both, good and bad. The difference was not the number of fish produced but the entertainment and accommodation factors. The good ones I remember were great entertainers; some had great stories or jokes, some were very knowledgeable as to the local history both natural history and local legends. The good ones were sensitive to the requests of the patrons. The good ones identified the skill levels of all the individuals on the boat. Basically the one trait that separates the good from bad are thier "people skills" as opposed to thier "fishing skills".

  17. #17

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    good thread, definatly is enlightening to read as a new charter capt. whats expected. Guess most of it's really taken for granted.

  18. #18
    Member ak_powder_monkey's Avatar
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    A good guide knows more about fishing the local area than I do, and does his best to impart that information to me. Thats the reason I hire a guide because a lot of times I know I don't know $&!^ also a good guide has a boat, and I usually don't lol
    I choose to fly fish, not because its easy, but because its hard.

  19. #19

    Default Capt. from Hell..

    I once had a need to take a couple of important business clients fishing for Tarpon. My boat was down so I reserved a day with a reputable Tarpon guide that I knew of. The evening before our scheduled and paid in advance day of fishing the Capt. called me with some sort of lame excuse as to why he would be unable to take us but that he had called a friend and he would be able to. I asked about the substitute Capt. and was quite explicit as to my expectations...I wanted my clients to at least have the opportunity to jump a fish (Tarpon). He assured me the substitute was a good fisherman and that would be no problem as there were lots of tarpon in the area we were planning to fish. Not wanting to cancel the trip I agreed to the arrangement. We arrived at the dock twenty minutes early full of eager anticipation. The "Captain from Hell" showed up thirty minutes late red eyed and reeking from the previous nights over indulgence. He explained to us that we would have to drive over to another dock the other side of town because the owner of the facility we were at didn't allow him to use the dock. Hmmm ...not stating off well!! We drove the twenty minutes to the public dock and waited on him....now an hour and a half late in departing. As we boarded the boat I noticed he had prerigged his rods. Stainless steel leaders with 4xxx trebles...(anyone that knows tarpon fishing would know this is not a good set up, tarpon are very keen eyed and far less likely to hit a bait that is on a wire leader and treble hooks are not appropriate either). We headed out of the harbor in search of some nearby shrimp seiners to buy some "by catch" for chum and bait. It took three tries before we found a boat that had what we needed...a good Capt. with his act together would have already procured the bait and chum. We then departed for the area we would be fishing a few miles up the coast. After spending all morining chumming the area we had not raised the first fish...well, that's fishing isn't it. The radio was on during the whole time we were trying in vain and the area chatter was about all the tarpon that were being seen just sixteen miles from where we were. I asked the Captain if we might make a run to that area and his reply was that he knew who was doing the talking and they lied a lot. I also knew the skippers of the boats he was referring to and knew better. I let it go...he suggested we run to a reef he knew of and fish for king mackerel, and least we might catch one of those..I deferred to my clients and they thought that would be O.K. so off we go. After the relocation it didn't take long before one of the rods went off and my client was on his first King Mackerel. The Capt came to the back of the boat to clear some lines, he had six out (two or three more than was necessary) and asked my other client to steer the boat. Before long he was yelling, no cursing at the boat driver (my very important business client!) for not following his instructions. After the fish was landed, nothing special a fifteen pound-er, I had a brief "conference" with the Capt. He went into pout mode at that time and had very little to say the rest of the day. We headed for shore about an hour earlier than had been agreed, I didn't say anything as I had really had my belly full of this moron. Immediately after clearing the inlet the boat ran out of gas! Unbelievable! He radioed to the Marina to bring him some fuel...that took about an hour. We finally made it to the dock and unloaded our gear and the few fish we had caught. I started for the car and this clown followed me up the dock and had the nerve to ask if I had forgotten his tip! I let you fill in the response I had for him as it would surely be deleted from this web site!.......

  20. #20

    Default Expectations from a guide.

    Here are my expectations from a guide.
    I am taking my first trip to Alaska this year. It is something I have always dreamed of doing. I will have put a lot of planning and money into this trip, and unfortunately my time there will not be long.

    Admittedly I am also pretty green when it comes to fishing. Loved it as a kid but living near the Big Apple couldn’t get out much. Wasn’t until about 5 years ago that I was able to pick it back up again. With the family responsibilities and the Salmon River a 4 to 5 hour drive I get one or two trips a year in at most. Spend much of the rest of the year dreaming about the next trip, and picking up as much information as I can.

    To me hiring a guide is not very different from using a tour guide on any other vacation. I am not familiar with the area and will be traveling a long distance to get there. I will be there for a short period of time. So I will need someone to show me around and help me make the most of my time there. There is a value in that. However it should be within reason.


    So if he is courteous respectful and has a good sense of humor, he is a good guide.


    If he doesn’t look down at me because it took me a while to remember how to tie a clinch knot, or had some bad casts, he is a good guide.


    If my guide takes me to some good holes, teaches me more about this sport, he is a good guide.


    I could go on with more but in short if he is someone who has a love for what he does, and where he is, chances are he will be good guide.

    OP1

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