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Thread: Powerbelt bullet explosion

  1. #1
    Member Roger's Avatar
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    Default Powerbelt bullet explosion

    Anyone ever have a Powerbelt bullet explode into a 1,000 pieces ? Was out shooting today and I was shooting a 295 grain with 2- 50/50 triple seven pellets and when it hit the paper it looked like a #8 birdshot from a 12 gauge .
    PEOPLE SAY I HAVE A.D.D I DON'T UNDERSTA.....OH LOOK A MOOSE !!!

  2. #2

    Default nope

    Never heard of that problem, though I've seen others. My biggest beef in the old version was erratic shedding of the plastic base cup, especially 54 cal. Sometimes they come right off and sometimes they hang in all the way to the target. In the latter case it will move the bullet 8-10" away from point of aim. The new platinum version supposedly fixes all former issues, but they haven't bought back all my old ones, and I don't feel right buying the new till they do.

  3. #3
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    Default It happened to me too...I think!

    I just shot my first Muzzleloading blackie with a TC Encore handgun (15" barrel). My 295 gr. Powerbelt entered through her shoulder and when it exited...two ribs were blown out! The bullet did not hit any bone going in...yet there was a 4.5" hole exiting her ribcage???

    The powerbelt bullet appears to be pure lead that has been plated.

  4. #4
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    Default It happened to me too...I think!

    I just shot my first Muzzleloading blackie with a TC Encore handgun (15" barrel). My 295 gr. Powerbelt entered through her shoulder and when it exited...two ribs were blown out! The bullet did not hit any bone going in...yet there was a 4.5" hole exiting her ribcage???

  5. #5
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    Default

    I shot a deer with 295gr and hit no bone or vital organ and she dropped
    on bullet impact. I think those bullets are great. I have seen three deer
    taken with the power belts and it drops them instantly. Also on all three deer there was no exit wound. It does look like the bullets explode inside the deer. I would try to avoid hitting the shoulder blade on a bigger animal
    or use a different bullet on a grizz.

  6. #6
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    Default

    I switched to the barnes expander MZ and had great sucess on MN whitetails. I have used XTP, spitfire, and a couple other tipped lead sabots of the same design as the powerbelts and though everything was dead with one shot, I wasn't that impressed with the knockdown until I used the barnes. The last deer did a backflip when hit.
    You know you aren't really having fun until you ask yourself -how much is this going to cost me?

  7. #7
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    Default

    I shot a mule deer in Utah w/ a Powerbelt. It was a easy 25 yard broadside shot. Perfect shot placement, but he still ran about 75 yards through thick brush. The blood trail was almost nothing - just a few drops. It took me about an hour to find him.

    Upon examination I saw no exit wound. I couldn't find any pieces of the bullet either.

    A few days later my brother shot another deer with my gun. He said it was an easy 30-40 yard shot, and he thought he hit the deer perfectly. He NEVER found the deer.

    POWERBELTS SUCK. I've read a lot about them since then and almost everyone has had a similar experiences.

    They're horrible bullets with a very deceptive advertising scheme. I'll never use them again.

    I'm going to switch to a Barnes solid copper bullet next time I muzzleloader hunt.

  8. #8

    Default

    I've tried most of the conicals on game, and probably shot all of them on paper at one time or another- in both 50 and 54 cal.

    A couple of things have floated to the surface that are worth passing along.

    The gosh darned things are outrageously expensive when you do lots of shooting- In my case 30-50 rounds a session and three or four sessions a month during slow periods.

    All-lead conicals such as the Hornady Great Plains, TC Maxi and Buffalo are usually at least as accurate and often more accurate. They're also usually as least good as the others on game, and when they're not at least as good, they're better. End-to-end penetration with head on shots, good expansion for broadside shots.

    A mould for casting your own doesn't cost much more than a single batch of sabot bullets, as well as Powerbelts. As little as $20 or so from Lee, and $40 from Lyman. If you have a Coleman stove, a pot and an old kitchen ladel you don't need anything else to cast them.

    Use pure lead, lube the bullet with something like Wonderlube, and put a lubed felt wad (available cheap in most places you buy bullets) between the bullet and the powder, and they can be scary accurate with the right powder charge.

    If you're doing your target shooting with the right kind of backstop, you can recover most of your bullets and remelt them, making it even cheaper to shoot them. Scrap lead is free when you search around a little. Even if you're buying scrap lead at $1 a pound, you are only paying something like 5 cents each or $5 for 100 bullets. The $15 you spend for ten sabot bullets buys you 300 of the homecast variety.

    Howcum so few people cast their own all-lead conicals?

  9. #9
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    Default

    I used to cast my own fishing jigs and sinkers. When I got a job, it wasn't worth the marginal results anymore. I kind of assumed that casting bullets would be the same. I only shoot to sight in and to hunt with, so even with a couple deer a year, that $20 on bullets goes a long way. Couple years most of the time. Though i could see doing it if I shot as much as you do BrownBear. Might be cool to kill something with a bullet I made myself, too. For now though the cool factor isn't enough to entice me to try it. Just doesn't make sense to cast 10 bullets a year. Good info, though. Thanks.
    You know you aren't really having fun until you ask yourself -how much is this going to cost me?

  10. #10

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    Yeah, that's like most hunters these days. I was just trying to encourage folks to shoot more, figuring if it was cheaper they'd do it. And you're right, it's way cool to take game with a rifle you built yourself shooting bullets you cast yourself.

  11. #11
    Member 1CRAZY1's Avatar
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    Default

    Your hit the nail right on the head Zeb! They are VERY inconsistent! Wouldnt buy another one!!

    Quote Originally Posted by zeb View Post
    I shot a mule deer in Utah w/ a Powerbelt. It was a easy 25 yard broadside shot. Perfect shot placement, but he still ran about 75 yards through thick brush. The blood trail was almost nothing - just a few drops. It took me about an hour to find him.

    Upon examination I saw no exit wound. I couldn't find any pieces of the bullet either.

    A few days later my brother shot another deer with my gun. He said it was an easy 30-40 yard shot, and he thought he hit the deer perfectly. He NEVER found the deer.

    POWERBELTS SUCK. I've read a lot about them since then and almost everyone has had a similar experiences.

    They're horrible bullets with a very deceptive advertising scheme. I'll never use them again.

    I'm going to switch to a Barnes solid copper bullet next time I muzzleloader hunt.

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