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Thread: Vogel Lake Cabin How to get there?

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    Premium Member kasilofchrisn's Avatar
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    Default Vogel Lake Cabin How to get there?

    I have rented a few cabins over the years around Alaska. Halibut cove Lagoon from Alaska state parks. Trout and Juneau lakes cabins in the Chugach national forest. Looked at a host of others and may rent some of them.
    last year we checked out the trapper joe lake cabin and the Big indian cabin by riding down mystery creek road.
    That was a fun ride.
    I also like to ride up on Tustumena Lake and have checked out most of the cabins up there.
    Lately I have become interested in the Vogel lake cabin on the Kenai National Wildlife Refuge. Their description says you can Fly or snowmobile to this cabin.
    I was wondering if anyone has ever taken a snowmobile to this cabin and how you got there?
    Is there a trail of any kind or would I have to blaze my own trail the whole way?
    Any info would be appreciated.
    "The closer I get to nature the farther I am from idiots"

    "Fishing and Hunting are only an addiction if you're trying to quit"

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    Premium Member kasilofchrisn's Avatar
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    Well it appears nobody has been there via snowmachine.
    Anyone wan't to try and make a trail to it this winter? I might just have to try and bushwack a trail once the refuge opens up.
    If anyone wants to try and make it into this cabin let me know.
    I might try to talk my fiancee into going out there with me since we have 2 sleds now.
    Maybe make a trail into it then come back later with some gear and spend the night. Maybe even a little ice fishing.
    Here is the cabin: http://kenai.fws.gov/VisitorsEducato.../vogellake.htm
    "The closer I get to nature the farther I am from idiots"

    "Fishing and Hunting are only an addiction if you're trying to quit"

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    Member tustumena_lake's Avatar
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    I haven't been there myself, but if I was heading that way looking for advice I would call up the Refuge at 262-7021 and ask to talk to the cabin guy, Gary Titus. He is usually in the office on Mondays.

    I think the Kenai Refuge is going to the recreation.gov website for cabin rentals starting on December 1st, if I remember correctly. You'll be able to book the refuge cabins online just like the Chugach National Forest Service cabins now after that date.

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    Premium Member kasilofchrisn's Avatar
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    Thanks for the reply.
    I have been planning on talking to the refuge folks when I get off the slope.
    I am kind of suprised that no one from here has been to that cabin though. I am sure there is a way I can get to it via snowmachine.
    It would be nice if there was some kind of trail though. At least one with a minimal amount of deadfalls and brush to remove.
    Looking at google earth it looks like maybe I could follow miller creek up to the lake.
    Of course I have to wait until the refuge is open to snowmachines.
    Hopefully we have a winter that is good for snowmachining and has lots of safe ice.
    I do like the Recreation.gov website. It makes it so easy to make reservations and you instantly know if a cabin is available.
    "The closer I get to nature the farther I am from idiots"

    "Fishing and Hunting are only an addiction if you're trying to quit"

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    Member tustumena_lake's Avatar
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    I've looked at that cabin on their website before and wondered who built it ?
    The website says: A large one story rustic log cabin built in the early 1940's as a hunting and fishing cabin.

    The Dictionary of Alaska Place Names says: Vogel Lake-Local name reported in 1958 by USGS. So its gone by that name for quite a while, obviously before the naming of most of the smaller lakes on the Kenai, in that general area, in the 1960's. Once Upon the Kenai doesn't list anyone named Vogel in the Surname Index and I don't recall any hearing of any "Kenai" Vogels before. I wonder what the history of that cabin is.

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    Premium Member kasilofchrisn's Avatar
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    Thats part of the Intrigue for me as well. I like the way it looks in the pictures they have of it. Looks like a neat place to visit.
    It also says there is some good trout fishing in the lake and that interests me as well.
    If you google it you find a few accounts of people flying into this lake but nothing about snowmachining in.
    Thanks for the info,
    "The closer I get to nature the farther I am from idiots"

    "Fishing and Hunting are only an addiction if you're trying to quit"

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    Ride until you reach miller creek, roughly 20 miles, then angle inland along miller creek until you reach the lake. no deadfall, bushwacking..


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    Member tustumena_lake's Avatar
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    The best I can determine is that a guy named Oscar H. Vogel built the place, or was associated somehow with its construction. From Shem Pete's Alaska:

    This is probably near the mouth of Miller Creek, the stream that drains Vogel Lake, south of Point Possession, where Oscar Vogel used to fish.
    http://www.google.com/#ds=bo&pq=voge...0&bih=426&bs=1

    Apparently, Vogel at one time attempted to gain title to the land but failed. From Senate Reports issued 1955:

    after final certification was made, but before the patent was issued, it was discovered that Mr. Vogel's lot was part of an area within the Kenai National Moose Reservoir (Range) created by an Executive order issued in 1941, and hence the application of entry should not have been allowed. In 1952 Mr. Vogel's filingfees were returned to him
    http://books.google.com/books?ei=y8O...+cabin&q=kenai

    He operated a fish trap in Cook Inlet waters, which may be what Shem Pete was referring to. From Who's Who in Alaska, 1947.

    Oscar H. Vogel trap in Cook Inlet District
    http://books.google.com/books?ei=mcS...+kenai&q=vogel

    Apparently he did some guiding on the Kenai Peninsula from this advertisement. From Field and Stream magazine, 1937.

    OSCAR H. VOGEL Care of Crescent Hotel, Anchorage, Alaska ALASKA Moose • Bear • Sheep Hunt on the well-known Kenai Peninsula I am now booking parties for fall hunt
    http://www.google.com/#ds=bo&pq=voge...0&bih=426&bs=1

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    Member tustumena_lake's Avatar
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    Interesting, he still has local offspring in the area. She would be a great source for further information.

    Mary’s father, Oscar Vogel, was one of the early big game master guides on the Kenai Peninsula
    http://peninsulaclarion.com/stories/...02dis002.shtml

    Oscar Vogel built most of the trappers cabins on the Su-Talkeetna River and most are still standing. He was quite an accomplished person.
    http://resources.rootsweb.com/~guest...45&action=view

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    Premium Member kasilofchrisn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by justin262 View Post
    Ride until you reach miller creek, roughly 20 miles, then angle inland along miller creek until you reach the lake. no deadfall, bushwacking..
    Thank a lot exactly the info that I was looking for.
    That was my plan from looking at google earth.
    Now once we get some snow and the refuge opens up I will definetly be checking it out.
    "The closer I get to nature the farther I am from idiots"

    "Fishing and Hunting are only an addiction if you're trying to quit"

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    Premium Member kasilofchrisn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by tustumena_lake View Post
    The best I can determine is that a guy named Oscar H. Vogel built the place, or was associated somehow with its construction. From Shem Pete's Alaska:

    This is probably near the mouth of Miller Creek, the stream that drains Vogel Lake, south of Point Possession, where Oscar Vogel used to fish.

    http://www.google.com/#ds=bo&pq=voge...0&bih=426&bs=1

    Apparently, Vogel at one time attempted to gain title to the land but failed. From Senate Reports issued 1955:

    after final certification was made, but before the patent was issued, it was discovered that Mr. Vogel's lot was part of an area within the Kenai National Moose Reservoir (Range) created by an Executive order issued in 1941, and hence the application of entry should not have been allowed. In 1952 Mr. Vogel's filingfees were returned to him
    http://books.google.com/books?ei=y8O...+cabin&q=kenai

    He operated a fish trap in Cook Inlet waters, which may be what Shem Pete was referring to. From Who's Who in Alaska, 1947.

    Oscar H. Vogel trap in Cook Inlet District
    http://books.google.com/books?ei=mcS...+kenai&q=vogel

    Apparently he did some guiding on the Kenai Peninsula from this advertisement. From Field and Stream magazine, 1937.

    OSCAR H. VOGEL Care of Crescent Hotel, Anchorage, Alaska ALASKA Moose • Bear • Sheep Hunt on the well-known Kenai Peninsula I am now booking parties for fall hunt
    http://www.google.com/#ds=bo&pq=voge...0&bih=426&bs=1
    Very interesting. I will try to get some good pictures of the cabin inside and out and post them on here. Might find some interesting stuff once I get out there and check things out read the log book etc. Thanks again for the info.
    "The closer I get to nature the farther I am from idiots"

    "Fishing and Hunting are only an addiction if you're trying to quit"

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    Member tustumena_lake's Avatar
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    Well then I got to wondering about Miller Creek, why is it called that. Sorry, I can't help it.

    The Dictionary of Alaska Place Names was a little help. It said:
    Local name reported in 1933 by USGS.

    The date of 1933 clued me it would be a name from an early Kenai source and so I headed to one of the few reference materials for that area of the Kenai Peninsula. In A Dena'ina Legacy K'tl'egh'i Sukdu The collect writings of Peter Kalifornsky published 1991....Peter tells us that the Miller most likely this creek was named after was George Miller Sr. He trapped from Moose River to West Fork which is somewhat south of there but puts him in the area and it makes sense.

    On a side note, his son, George Miller Jr. was the President of the Kenai Native Association in 1975 when a great book called The Kenaitze People was published by Robert Ackerman. There are wonderful photos from the 1890's of Kenai in that book.

    I was at the Kenai National Wildlife Refuge today talking to Gary about early Kenai Peninsula history and he answered a question for me I had not been able to resolve. Who was Swanson River named after. Fortunately in 1970 refuge manager Hakala ran that question down with some of the elderly Kenai natives and found out it was named after a trapper named Charley Swanson that lived in the area in the early 1900's.

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    Out of respect for the generations that have preceded us and the gracious sharing of knowledge from Peter Kalifornsky I would like to add the Dena'ina native name for Swanson River which was Yaghehtnu, that translates to 'good river'.

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    Quote Originally Posted by tustumena_lake View Post
    I was at the Kenai National Wildlife Refuge today talking to Gary about early Kenai Peninsula history and he answered a question for me I had not been able to resolve. Who was Swanson River named after. Fortunately in 1970 refuge manager Hakala ran that question down with some of the elderly Kenai natives and found out it was named after a trapper named Charley Swanson that lived in the area in the early 1900's.
    Huh. I had read that it was named after Charles Swanson, a trader or storekeeper in 1880s Kenai; in fact, the one who had grubstaked Alexander King, the discoverer of gold in the Hope area.
    Note on p. 31 of Mining on the Kenai Peninsula, Alaska:
    "Captain Swanson, born on July 7, 1854 in Sweden, came to Alaska in 1879. He lived in the Kenai area for several years. Swanson River... was named after him...".
    Maybe they are one in the same person.

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    I clicked on this thread because I was intrigued by the Vogel name in the title. Oscar Vogel had a place on Stephan Lake near the Prairie Crk outlet and guided out of there. A little google search revealed a man that really got out and about in the wilds. Very interesting.

    Here's a great little read about a trip a guy took with Oscar. http://www.epagepub.com/publication/?i=57671&p=31
    Bunny Boots and Bearcats: Utility Sled Mayhem

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    I have been to this cabin, it's a really nice stay, but not much of a winter stay. The cabin design is very cold inside. It's somewhat multi-level, with the stove being in the upper part of the cabin, and it's very hard to get the heat to go down. Again, it's a very nice place, just be prepared, and the ice fishing is great.

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    Quote Originally Posted by sayak View Post
    Huh. I had read that it was named after Charles Swanson, a trader or storekeeper in 1880s Kenai; in fact, the one who had grubstaked Alexander King, the discoverer of gold in the Hope area.
    Note on p. 31 of Mining on the Kenai Peninsula, Alaska:
    "Captain Swanson, born on July 7, 1854 in Sweden, came to Alaska in 1879. He lived in the Kenai area for several years. Swanson River... was named after him...".
    Maybe they are one in the same person.
    Yes he is probably the same person. Back in the day it seems no one had a permanent job but followed the seasons and opportunities for employment as they came up so they were a jack of all trades....fishing, canneries, trapping, fox farming, guiding, mining etc... I found one resource that said Swanson leased an island for fox farming and had several foxes on it so he was into a little bit of that too. It looks like he married in Kenai and had 2 children there but was gone by the late 1800's interpreting this old census report.

    SWANSON, CHAS age 44 Immigrated from Gottenburg, Sweden 1879 to Alaska 1886
    SWANSON, PARISCOYA age 25 b. Kenai father b. Russia mother b. Tulknok
    SWANSON, EMANUEL b.9/1889 Kenai father b. Sweden mother b. Kenai
    SWANSON, ANNIE b. 10/1891 b. Kenai father b.Sweden mother b. Kenai
    SWANSON, PAUL b. 1/1897 Nutchek father b. Sweden mother b. Kenai
    SWANSON, AXAEMNSIA b. 2/1900 Nutchek father b. Sweden mother b. Kenai
    http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb....n/nutchek.html

    In early Kenai it was very common for the native women to marry the whites because they could provide a better standard of living for them at the time. Even though it was still relatively humble compared to today. However, it was also just as common for the same native wives to have a native boyfriend on the side unbeknownst to their Scandinavian husbands out running the trapline.

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    Member sayak's Avatar
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    Default Yes...

    Quote Originally Posted by tustumena_lake View Post
    Yes he is probably the same person. Back in the day it seems no one had a permanent job but followed the seasons and opportunities for employment as they came up so they were a jack of all trades....fishing, canneries, trapping, fox farming, guiding, mining etc... I found one resource that said Swanson leased an island for fox farming and had several foxes on it so he was into a little bit of that too. It looks like he married in Kenai and had 2 children there but was gone by the late 1800's interpreting this old census report.

    SWANSON, CHAS age 44 Immigrated from Gottenburg, Sweden 1879 to Alaska 1886
    SWANSON, PARISCOYA age 25 b. Kenai father b. Russia mother b. Tulknok
    SWANSON, EMANUEL b.9/1889 Kenai father b. Sweden mother b. Kenai
    SWANSON, ANNIE b. 10/1891 b. Kenai father b.Sweden mother b. Kenai
    SWANSON, PAUL b. 1/1897 Nutchek father b. Sweden mother b. Kenai
    SWANSON, AXAEMNSIA b. 2/1900 Nutchek father b. Sweden mother b. Kenai
    http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb....n/nutchek.html

    In early Kenai it was very common for the native women to marry the whites because they could provide a better standard of living for them at the time. Even though it was still relatively humble compared to today. However, it was also just as common for the same native wives to have a native boyfriend on the side unbeknownst to their Scandinavian husbands out running the trapline.
    ... and apparently (according to the mining book) he moved over to run a boat on PWS after his days in Kenai. I really get the impression he was more of a trader/skipper than a trapper. Sort of like the early years of Cap Lathrop on Cook Inlet. As for the native women having a native boyfriend on the side, I hadn't heard that. From most historical accounts it appears that it was just the opposite out on the Aleutians where the poor native guys would be out on the trap line all winter long leaving their wives alone.

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    are you referring to Mary Barry's mining book sayak ? I am not near my library to check and see at the moment but I will if thats the right one. I am primarily interested in his Kenai Peninsula activities.

    but the account of his trading post is here too.
    http://books.google.com/books?id=koffcFS_Xn0C&pg=PA136&dq="charles+swanson "+alaska+miner&hl=en&ei=EyHATvudPKLaiQKrrLHTBA&sa= X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=6&ved=0CEwQ6AEwB Q#v=onepage&q&f=true

    I did find this about his fox raising activities.

    . Green Island, which is situated in Prince William Sound, about 80 miles from Ellamar, about 4 miles wide and about 15 miles long, is occupied by Peterson and Brown, who bought it from Charles Swanson for $2,500 in 1901. Swanson stocked this island in 1897 with five pairs of blue foxes, which cost him $750. The occupants killed about 100 foxes last year, which they sold for the usual price. The improvements consist of a dwelling house worth $600 or $700.
    http://books.google.com/books?pg=PA281&dq="charles swanson" green island&ei=qh3ATq7iC8WhiAK204G8Aw&ct=result&id=9V0Z AAAAYAAJ&output=text

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    Yup. Berry's book. A wealth of info in that book aside from the mining info.
    Gotta love googlebooks!
    I'm very intrigued about going to Vogel Lake now, but doubt I will make it there on my beater snow machine.

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