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Thread: What Type Of Manure Do You Prefare ?

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    Default What Type Of Manure Do You Prefare ?

    I like using Rabbit droppings sometimes referred to as black gold , rabbit manure is desirable for a variety of reasons, one being it's ability to be applied directly to the soil or around Plants.They are essentially beads of nitrogen and phosphorous and have the added benefit of acting as slow -release when added to the soil.

    Chicken droppings is one of the richest manures and very high in nitrogen. Chicken droppings are considered “hot” meaning they must be composted before being added to soil.

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    Premium Member denalihunter's Avatar
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    Our gardener last spring used moose droppings. She would go out and get a 5 gallon bucket full in about an hour. She did compost them but I don't think it would be needed. They did not seem hot like chicken manure. Things grew very well. She was doing the organic garden thing. I was impressed. Next year I'm going to do a side by side planting and see the difference of using one bed with miracle grow and chemicals, and the others organic.
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    worm poop. mainly bc iv got alil worm farm going(1 plastic bin)and cant raise livestok. collect poop as it builds up, come summer, mix into beds, or make tea-works great! noticable results. love the purity and "aliveness" of it! my compost sits plainly on ground-worms go in and feast leaving behind lotsa poop. agin aftr strained, mix into soil or make tea. very beneficial to eco harmony! -HEALTHY GREENS!!
    dont like chems, kills/disrupts balance i thnk.

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    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by hkr View Post
    dont like chems, kills/disrupts balance i thnk.
    Indeed it does. The soil food web is totally destroyed by the application of chemical fertilizers. It's ironic - the chemicals are designed to replace the very thing they're destroying, but they aren't fully capable of doing so. Mycorrhizal fungi, nematodes and the like work together to feed plants and replenish soil in a manner that simply cannot be replicated by chemicals. Organic gardening methods are not only more productive, but also result in food with higher nutrient content that tastes better.

    I'm pretty jealous of your worm farm - that's on my list of things to get going this winter.

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    Composted steer manure. Lots of it. Had spectacular improvement with it. Probably had as much to do with helping to stabilize moisture retention as nutrition. The benefit is undeniable in any case.

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    I did tons of Horse Manure. Got hooked up with a horse farm & got several tons for a few years.
    I composted each pile for 2 years, got about 160 deg, the first year. Then screened & stored it. Used lots & still have lots.
    Good way to get ahead on compost if you have the space & a source to get a big enough pile to cook it.
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    Horse manure is probably the easiest to acquire in the Mat-Valley... unless you have a contact with one of the few remaining dairy farms out here.. Either cow or horse manure is great for garden fertilizer... I recall back in the 70's the Extension office stated that there was little if any nutrition in Moose Marbles... Now I see they've researched it a little more in depth and are saying there is nutritional value in Moose Marbles... I tried the worm farming once, but I did it all wrong and lost my "herd" of worms.. Keep thinking I'll try it again...

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    Default just to be clear..

    Quote Originally Posted by hkr View Post
    worm poop. mainly bc iv got alil worm farm going(1 plastic bin)and cant raise livestok. collect poop as it builds up, come summer, mix into beds, or make tea-works great! noticable results. love the purity and "aliveness" of it! my compost sits plainly on ground-worms go in and feast leaving behind lotsa poop. agin aftr strained, mix into soil or make tea. very beneficial to eco harmony! -HEALTHY GREENS!!
    dont like chems, kills/disrupts balance i thnk.
    my worm bin sits inside. the compost im speaking of hear a is compost pile outside. both make great tea. the worm tea is more potent. in tea form is whn results are more noticed.
    sorry if any confusion.

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    Quote Originally Posted by mudbuddy View Post
    I did tons of Horse Manure. Got hooked up with a horse farm & got several tons for a few years.
    I composted each pile for 2 years, got about 160 deg, the first year. Then screened & stored it. Used lots & still have lots.
    Good way to get ahead on compost if you have the space & a source to get a big enough pile to cook it.

    I see I am not the only one that uses a sander as a shaker. Goat is pretty good also material is broken down more than horse or bovine.

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    Moderator LuJon's Avatar
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    I have heard of great results with humanure!

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    I use primarily horse manure, but any works. Even Humanure, if properly handled. This year's garden used fresh, less than a week old horse manure with bedding. plus some gifts from my dogs and cats. I did end up with a few grain seeds germinating the first few weeks, but nothing after that.
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    The manure from herbivores is pretty safe to use. The manure from carnivores or omnivores must be composted in a hot pile to kill pathogens! That includes dogs, cats, even most chickens. I've used humanure for a long time, but I don't use it in the food garden until it's either several years old or else fully composted twice.

    When I lived in China, the farmers used to use humanure directly on the vegetable fields. Everyone got sick but the locals got used to it. Now they compost it first and things are much better, but in some rural areas you can still see the old multi-stall outhouses that sluiced directly onto the paddies or into the irrigation ditches.
    Inspiration is simply the momentary cessation of stupidity.

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    i also use my urine. at abt 1 to 10 more/less. stored in fridge. morning pee seems richest. jst dont mistake for apple juice. lol and dont over apply-can burn.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Brian M View Post
    Indeed it does. The soil food web is totally destroyed by the application of chemical fertilizers. It's ironic - the chemicals are designed to replace the very thing they're destroying, but they aren't fully capable of doing so. Mycorrhizal fungi, nematodes and the like work together to feed plants and replenish soil in a manner that simply cannot be replicated by chemicals. Organic gardening methods are not only more productive, but also result in food with higher nutrient content that tastes better.

    I'm pretty jealous of your worm farm - that's on my list of things to get going this winter.

    amen! also hate the pesticides or wutevr i gotta try n wash off from store produce. can u always trust the xpensiver "100% organic" labels? -gottado wut gottado-.

    to overcome jealousy, one must build bggr/bttr worm farm-lol. i didnt go a w/drainage system. my bins been on the wet side and i probably shud do a subrait overhaul-might xplain why my herds dwindled. w/drainage, u'd have the option to wash down sustrait and w/all its goodys/xcesses like rain. too much buid up canbcom <(good one? 3 spaces saved-lol) toxic.

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    I don't like the horse poop it promotes too much tall weed. One of my customers here in the valley has a bunch of reindeer and I swear his tomato plants are 15- 20 foot tall, kid you not, never seen anything like em
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    Quote Originally Posted by ironartist View Post
    I don't like the horse poop it promotes too much tall weed. One of my customers here in the valley has a bunch of reindeer and I swear his tomato plants are 15- 20 foot tall, kid you not, never seen anything like em
    That why I compost it first. The 150 to 160 degree temps kills almost all seeds.
    Straight HM with the bedding is high nitrogen (the bedding soaks up the urine & is very high in nitrogen)
    But this nitrogen is why the piles get real hot & compost well.
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    Quote Originally Posted by hkr View Post
    amen! also hate the pesticides or wutevr i gotta try n wash off from store produce. can u always trust the xpensiver "100&#37; organic" labels? -gottado wut gottado-.

    to overcome jealousy, one must build bggr/bttr worm farm-lol. i didnt go a w/drainage system. my bins been on the wet side and i probably shud do a subrait overhaul-might xplain why my herds dwindled. w/drainage, u'd have the option to wash down sustrait and w/all its goodys/xcesses like rain. too much buid up canbcom <(good one? 3 spaces saved-lol) toxic.

    substrate
    . sorry, unpurposed spelling screw.

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    Member ironartist's Avatar
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    I wonder what the glitch this is the third time I have seen the &#37 come up in a post where the % symbol should be
    Visions Steel/841-WELD(9353)
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    % % % %................................................. works for me.

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    Quote Originally Posted by ironartist View Post
    I wonder what the glitch this is the third time I have seen the &#37 come up in a post where the &#37; symbol should be
    This is just how computers work. Every symbol has an "&#XX;" computer code. When a non-ASCII character is typed, HTML automatically converts it to code. That means it can show up correctly when first posted, but be converted if quoted or edited. Also, there's actually more than one percent-sign character in the alphabet (even though they might look the same to you), so sometimes it will convert to &#37; and sometimes it won't, depending on software details. This can be fixed on your computer but honestly it isn't worth the effort.

    Now back to manure ...
    Inspiration is simply the momentary cessation of stupidity.

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