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Thread: Axe and saw

  1. #1
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    Default Axe and saw

    Had to pass along my experience with my fire wood tools this moose season.

    Until now, I've always gone on hunt trips with an ATV and could take a small chainsaw. This time, a Supercub was the method of transport, so, no chainsaw. I have to admit, I was a bit freaked out about the firewood capability without a chainsaw. I like a good campfire! I asked a LOT of sourdoughs and got all sorts of answers.

    So, I knew I'd have to cut wood, and split it.

    I chose the Gerber splitting axe and Wyoming Saw II.

    The axe: Awesome. I needed something that would do all chopping, hammering, splitting, and this thing delivers in spades. It definitely needs to be kept away from rocks in the dirt though because the edge doesn't defy physics but I took a largish diamond sharpener from AIH for super easy edge maintenance. The length of the axe is perfect. It's not this huge thing that gets in the way, but still allows a long overhead strike for heavy chopping. It has a splitting sweep to the back of the blade. It does a fantastic job. It is not heavy like a maul so it's a great thing for a fly-in camp. Overall, I'm sold. If I lost it tomorrow, I'd buy another. The price is right too.

    The saw: At first, I was doubtful. But, after using it, I'm sold. The bone blade with that long stroke makes moose parting so easy too. For firewood, it'll go more than half way through a black spruce and that's all that's needed. The blades that come with the saw are excellent. I bought a spare of each but did not need them.

    So, chop tree down with Gerber axe and drag to camp. Sit around and cut up my rounds with the Wyoming saw. Split with Gerber axe.

    Just a simple chore but having the right tools sure makes camp life nicer.

  2. #2
    Member mainer_in_ak's Avatar
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    I too bring a gerber camp ax and a wyoming saw. I found the wyoming saw to be a quite a bit too slow and the teeth aren't raked far enough apart. I usually offset the teeth a bit and the saw has a much more aggressive cut with less instances of the blade getting stuck in the wood. Finally, this season, I went to Sven Saw blades and they work much better. You have to modify the Sven saw blade by cutting it shorter and drilling a new hole. The combination of the deep cutting depth of the wyoming saw, and the aggressive Sven blade work quite well. Make sure to observe the tightener piece. If the notch isn't deep enough, the blade could slip off on the forward stroke and you could slice your knuckles open (don't ask me how I know). If you feel the notch doesn't secure the blade well enough, a small triangular file will notch it better.

    Here's a link to the place I buy my spare sven saw blades:

    http://www.campmor.com/sven-folding-...ci_sku=81036WC

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    Great tip! Thanks!

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    Member ironartist's Avatar
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    Naw as saws go I don't like anything with a backbone it doesn't fit thru the cut well I started carrying a stanley sharp(shark tooth)saw it has no backbone for zipping thru a brisket and you can cut a cord a firewood in a hurry if you need to,well maybe not a cord but they sure cut well stop by your local hardware store and pick one up for a 20 dollar bill and see what you think the little guy with the foot long blade
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    Member mainer_in_ak's Avatar
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    wyoming saw fits fine through a cut. The backbone of the saw is only a 1/4" (or less) thick. As you cut down a set of ribs, it spreads apart plenty for the cut to continue. The blade has enough length to make quick cuts on rounds of firewood too. Firewood is where you can only cut so far before you have to turn the piece over and cut from the other side, but not the case with cutting up wild game.

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    Member ironartist's Avatar
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    go drop 20 bucks at aih and give one a try you might just change your mind after you give it a whirl. In my book they beat my wyoming saw hands down
    Visions Steel/841-WELD(9353)
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    I never used my Wyoming saw once I started carrying a Stanley cross cut saw. The Stanleys are much ligher, no parts to lose, will cut through both bone and wood much faster, and are cheaper. If you ever tried one doubt you would go back to a Wyoming.

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    Member AKDoug's Avatar
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    Me too. Big believer in those Stanley Sharp tooth saws. Cuts push and pull too.

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    Member mainer_in_ak's Avatar
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    I took into consideration the advice of those enthused about the Stanley Sharp Tooth saws. I was trying to find the longest one they made, and it came down to a 26" model and a 20" model. The 26" model had finish teeth and the 20" had courser teeth. Furthermore, the 20" model had a thicker blade, and had some sort of black coating on it that is supposedly supposed to reduce friction and binding by 50 percent. I ended up going with the 20" model but wish it was a bit longer. I hope it's faster than my Wymong Saw with shortened Sven blades, if not, it'll sure make a dandy wood-working hand saw to replace my old one.

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    Member ironartist's Avatar
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    I think mine was like a 16 and I nipped a few inches off to fit in the longest pocket of my daypack, I always have a saw with me
    Visions Steel/841-WELD(9353)
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    Member greythorn3's Avatar
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    ha gerber axe and stanley sharp tooth huh
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    I've got one of these....never thought about using it on game. I'll have to give it a try.

    No good reason it wouldn't zip up camp wood either I guess.

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    Member ironartist's Avatar
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    I wrapped the cardboard cover with duct tape and have got many seasons out of it also that way I don't damage my pack when taking it out or putting it up
    Visions Steel/841-WELD(9353)
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    Member sayak's Avatar
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    After watching several threads on saws over the years, I thought I was the only one who used a regular saw around the camp. I use a Stanley sheetrock saw with really aggressive teeth for years (believe it pre-dates the "Sharptooth"). It is about 16" long and has a sharp entry point tip. Mine has a gray plastic handle which I prefer to a wood handle in rainy conditions. Works great for both firewood and bone. Not very trendy looking and you won't find your REI folks with one but I don't give a rip 'cause I'm old school.

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    Member ironartist's Avatar
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    I was even kinda hesitant to write anything about the saw I carry while I recreate the outdoors figuring I was gonna be slammed up one thread and down another. I am glad to see people use this type of saw and I am not the only one. They are a great tool for whatever use a guy finds for them plus they are at every store that has any type of hardware or tools.
    Visions Steel/841-WELD(9353)
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    Quote Originally Posted by sayak View Post
    After watching several threads on saws over the years, I thought I was the only one who used a regular saw around the camp. I use a Stanley sheetrock saw with really aggressive teeth for years (believe it pre-dates the "Sharptooth"). It is about 16" long and has a sharp entry point tip. Mine has a gray plastic handle which I prefer to a wood handle in rainy conditions. Works great for both firewood and bone. Not very trendy looking and you won't find your REI folks with one but I don't give a rip 'cause I'm old school.
    My Dad used to use a Disston saw just like a pointed sheetrock saw that was about 12-14" with a hook like steel handle that would cut anything pronto. I remember him sharpening the saw with a little triangle file and keeping the point sharp too. Hadn't thought of that saw in ages...thanks for reminding me Sayak!!

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